House of Commons Hansard #22 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was billion.

Topics

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Does the hon. chief government whip have the unanimous consent of the House to propose this motion?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

(Motion agreed to)

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

April 1st, 2010 / 10:05 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 10, 12 and 52.

Question No. 10
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

With regard to the Airport Soundscape Consultative Committee for Montreal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport, of which Transport Canada is a member, and as a follow-up to the October 5, 2009 letter from the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities to the honourable Member from Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine: (a) what have been the exact measures implemented over the last 15 years by this Committee designed to minimize aircraft noise around Montreal’s airports; and (b) what impact have these measures had on minimizing aircraft noise around Montreal’s airports?

Question No. 10
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the response is as follows: (a) During the December 1998 Airport Soundscape Consultative Committee, it was decided that the approach path angle for runway 06L was to be increased to 3 degrees from 2.5 degrees, thus ensuring that aircraft are at a higher altitude while flying over Dorval and Pointe-Claire. Since February 1999, turbojets departing runway 24R must climb to 4000 feet before turning right. This higher altitude, compared to the previous 3000 feet, results in noise reduction of 3 dBA for the Beaconsfield and Pointe-Claire residents. In 1999, in order to increase the altitude at which Boeing 747 fly over residential areas, the operators of those aircraft were advised to review their operational procedures to ensure a minimum rate of climb at take off. In 1999, the preferential runway for night landings was changed to 06R instead of 24R. By flying over Lake St-Louis instead of over the residential areas of Montreal and Ville St-Laurent, fewer residents are affected by the noise.

Starting April 1st, 2000, exemptions to restricted hours were not granted for delays due to mechanical defects. In June 2000, amendments to the general aviation flight takeoff procedures were made so that departing aircraft operating between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. and flying over industrial areas would avoid Montreal’s residential areas. In 2000, implementation of a noise awareness program for air traffic controllers was put into place. In March 2001, a new exemption program to restrict hours of operation for mechanical problems was introduced. This program only applies to chapter 3 aircraft, the most modern and quieter types, and allows the operators to extend their operating hours by one hour in case of real and documented problems. An annual quota was established at 200 exemptions, which will be prorated according to each airline’s movements. This procedure gives greater flexibility to airlines without increase in the total noise footprint.

In 2003, changes were made to the preferential runway procedure for day flights. Until then, with westerly winds, jets were taking off on runway 24L and landing on 24R, causing noise disturbances to a group of Dorval’s residents. The procedure was therefore changed to allow a number of take offs from 24R. In September 2006, a new preferential runway system was implemented for night flights. When there are favourable winds, departures take place in priority from runway 06L, followed by a left turn over highway 13; and landings take place on runway 06R. Residents of South Dorval, who were usually overflown by departing aircraft between 11:00 p.m. and 07:00 a.m., are now overflown by landing aircraft and Cartierville residents are overflown by departing aircraft. On February 9, 2009, since two of the performance criteria were not met, the historical priority runway system that was in effect prior to September 2006, ascribing priority to Runways 24 between midnight and 7 a.m., takeoffs and landings toward Lake St-Louis, was reinstated.

(b) After the implementation of the February 1999 procedure requiring that turbojets departing runway 24R climb to 4000 feet before turning right, studies have shown a reduction of 3dBA for residents living under the flight path.

According to Aéroport de Montréal’s annual report published in May 2009, “the most recent Noise Exposure Contour NEF 25 shows that the noise footprint at Montreal/Trudeau was 32.3 km² in size in 2007, representing a 60% decrease from 1995. During the same period, the number of residents living under the noise footprint has decreased by 83%, from 107,333 to 17,902. Airlines retiring older and noisier chapter 2 aircraft and replacing them with a new generation of modern, quieter and better performing airplanes and the implementation of noise abatement procedures are the factors that contributed the most to this improvement.”

The noise exposure forecast, NEF, mentioned in Aéroport de Montréal’s report is produced to encourage compatible land use planning in the vicinity of airports. A NEF 25 contour represents the area within which Transport Canada does not support or advocate residential housing.

Question No. 12
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

With regard to canola and canola-related products manufactured in Canada: (a) do these products contain any genetic use restriction technologies (GURT), also known as “terminator technologies”; and (b) have these products ever in the past contained any genetic use restriction technologies?

Question No. 12
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the response is as follows: (a) No applications have ever come forward for the regulatory approval of any plants, including canola, with GURT traits in Canada.

(b) Plants with GURT traits, including canola, have neither been planted in research field trials nor commercialized in Canada.

Question No. 52
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Newton—North Delta, BC

With respect to the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games, what discussions regarding the reservation of tickets for purchase by Members of Parliament have occurred (i) within the department of Canadian Heritage, (ii) between the department of Canadian Heritage and the Privy Council Office?

Question No. 52
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, the 2010 winter games provided a rare opportunity to further domestic, international and business relations and to showcase Canada to the world.

In accordance with the terms of the multiparty agreement signed by the previous Liberal government in 2002, 2010 winter games partners, including the Government of Canada, GoC, and other government partners in the games had advance access to purchase 2010 Olympic and Paralympic winter games tickets at face value.

The government has made it mandatory that all members of parliament, House of Commons and Senate, pay for their own tickets. The cost of these tickets will be fully cost-recovered by the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Tickets were paid for by the ticket holders, not the Canadian taxpayer.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Question No. 69 could be made an order for return, this return would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.