House of Commons Hansard #59 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trade.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, my colleague from Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel told the government about the disturbing situation in the community of Kanesatake. The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs downplayed the events and essentially said it was up to the municipality to manage the potential crisis. Yet the government can put a stop to this new risk of confrontation immediately, instead of denying the events that led to the 1990 Oka crisis.

When will the government stop being so short-sighted and put in place—

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we continue to monitor the situation. We are working with the first nation to resolve outstanding issues in the best interests of the Mohawks of Kanesatake and the wider community. We believe that dialogue remains the best venue to resolve this problem.

Asbestos
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, asbestos is the greatest industrial killer the world has ever known. More Canadians die from asbestos than all other industrial causes combined, yet Canada continues to be one of the largest producers in the world, dumping 200,000 tonnes a year into developing nations such as India and Indonesia, where there are virtually no health and safety protocols.

Instead of being one of the world's cheerleaders and boosters of asbestos, why does the government not stop giving corporate welfare to these corporate serial killers and ban asbestos once and for all, as the rest of the developing nations have? Why does the government continue to give them money and support this killer of an industry?

Asbestos
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, for the past 30 years, Canada has taken a safe approach to using chrysotile asbestos. Moreover, recent scientific journals report that chrysotile asbestos can be used safely.

Justice
Oral Questions

June 9th, 2010 / 3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, impaired driving remains the most common cause of death by criminal means. It was just over two years ago that our government's bill, the Tackling Violent Crime Act, received royal assent. Among other things, it closed the loophole that could allow a person involved in the most serious accidents to refuse to provide a breath sample. Today, impaired drivers can be charged with a criminal offence if they refuse to do so.

Could the Minister of Justice please update this House on the status of this file?

Justice
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is true. Thanks to our Tackling Violent Crime Act, we have tougher mandatory penalties for people convicted of impaired driving. What we also did in that act was finally get rid of the so-called two beer defence.

In our efforts to make our streets safer, I am pleased to see that our auto theft bill is back from the Senate. I am calling upon the members of the opposition coalition to put aside their ideological problems and support this important piece of legislation. Canadians deserve safer streets.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of His Excellency Mr. Abdou Diouf, Secretary-General of la Francophonie.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would also like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Kamalesh Sharma, Secretary-General of the Commonwealth.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Chief Electoral Officer
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I have the honour to lay upon the table a report of the Chief Electoral Officer entitled, “Responding to Changing Needs: Recommendations from the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada Following the 40th General Election”.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's responses to nine petitions.

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-36, An Act respecting the safety of consumer products.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Elder Abuse Awareness
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Minister of State (Seniors)

Mr. Speaker, on June 15, Canada will join countries around the world in marking the fifth annual World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.

I am pleased to say that also on June 15 there will be an International Elder Abuse Awareness Conference in Toronto. The conference will feature presentations on elder abuse initiatives across Canada and around the world. It will also focus partially on youth and intergenerational activities that promote awareness of elder abuse.

Taking action against this very serious issue begins with education, by teaching all Canadians to recognize the signs and symptoms of elder abuse and where to go for help, and empowerment, by encouraging older Canadians to speak up, individually and collectively.

We are taking steps on these two fundamentals. In budget 2008, we committed $13 million over three years to help raise awareness about elder abuse and to aid seniors and all Canadians in dealing with this issue.

As part of the initiative, we launched a national elder abuse awareness campaign in 2009. The “Elder abuse, it is time to face the reality” campaign reached out to Canadians of all ages through television, print, and the Internet.

As members know, the priority of this government is always the safety and security of Canadians. Therefore, we see the issue of elder abuse as a very serious one. That is why I am pleased to announce that we will be launching a new phase of the elder abuse awareness campaign across the country in the fall.

The campaign aims to help seniors, as well as all Canadians, recognize the signs and symptoms of elder abuse and exploitation in all its forms—physical, financial, sexual, psychological, and neglect—and to provide important information on the support that is available.

Furthermore, budget 2010 provides an additional $10 million over two years to the new horizons for seniors program, bringing the program total for the next two years to $80 million. This enhanced funding will support projects that focus on volunteering among seniors and on raising awareness about the financial exploitation of seniors.

The new horizons for seniors program also has an elder abuse awareness funding component. Through this funding, new educational and awareness resources about elder abuse will be available. These will again help improve quality of life, safety, and security for seniors and will enable non-profit organizations and coalitions to raise awareness on a national or regional level.

As the Minister of State for Seniors, I am proud of the work this government is doing to empower older Canadians. On June 15, I encourage all Canadians to focus on ways to join in the fight against elder abuse.