House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was children.

Topics

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Martha Hall Findlay Willowdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, the United States is once again threatening protectionist legislation that will significantly harm Canadian businesses and jobs.

The minister's response? Nothing. First he said that we are just collateral damage in the battles between the United States and China. Then he said that we are hoping it will not get to a vote before the American elections. Then he said that if it does, if it passes, we will probably seek an exemption for Canadian companies.

Who is the minister kidding? Canadian businesses need something done. What action will the minister take and when?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, in these difficult economic times, Canadians can count on our government to oppose protectionism and defend free and open trade on the world stage. That includes our close relationship with the United States.

We are following this bill closely and working to ensure that Canada's concerns are taken into account by the U.S. lawmakers.

It should be made clear that it is far from certain whether this bill will become law, but our government will continue to work closely with the Obama administration on issues like this.

As a result of our relationship, Canada was the only country in the world to be able to get an exemption from the buy American provisions of the U.S. stimulus program.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Martha Hall Findlay Willowdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, first, that heavily touted exemption actually covers only 37 states, so it does not go very far.

Second, the member said that we are “following” this effort. “Following” does not do anything for Canadian businesses and jobs.

I would say that the ambassador in the United States is working hard to pursue this. That is a good thing, because the minister is not.

I would offer that in this circumstance we need a strong, united Canadian front to battle this legislation, which could be very damaging, and we need to do it now.

I am offering my help. Will the minister accept? If so, can we start today?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the member's offer of assistance. I am sure that the minister will be pleased to hear that as well.

The reality is that Ambassador Doer in the United States is working very closely with the American administration to try to make sure that this bill does not turn into law.

We can depend upon our government and our minister to protect Canadians' interests in the United States or anywhere else in the world.

United Nations
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, we all want Canada to win a seat at the Security Council, and we commend our diplomats from the Pearson Building to New York for doing a great job.

One of the things we need to see is members from all of the parties in the House helping with this.

Has the government considered working with the opposition to help Canada win a seat at the Security Council? Yes or no.

United Nations
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to hear that the NDP is willing to help us win the seat. I am extremely confused with the position of the Bloc and the Liberal Party.

The Bloc leader said that we do not deserve a seat, and yet we get questions from the Bloc critics asking when will we get on the Security Council.

It is the same way with the Liberal Party. Its leader said that we do not deserve a seat and yet all Liberal critics are coming out and saying we must work together to get the seat.

Would someone clarify what is going on on that side? My thanks to the NDP.

United Nations
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, according to his speech to the United Nations, the Prime Minister claims to understand that, “Our interests are all linked together: Climate change to health threats and pandemics, including, of course, the economy”.

However, the Prime Minister is a strange messenger for that message. To be taken seriously, Canada must follow through on her global commitments.

Will the Prime Minister back up his claims by reversing the freeze on our international development, committing to real action on climate change, and signing the UN declaration on indigenous rights?

United Nations
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, contrary to what the member is presenting, the fact is that we have doubled our aid to Africa. We have increased our total contribution to the world to $5 billion a year, which is the highest this country has ever given.

Our government is taking leadership because we recognize the responsibility that we have to the world as Canadians. All Canadians are proud of what we are doing.

Economic Development
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Stephen Woodworth Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government, through our economic action plan, has been investing in the people, businesses and communities of southern Ontario and my riding of Kitchener Centre. We are seeing results. Since May 2009 over 200,000 new jobs have been created in Ontario alone.

In order to continue creating jobs and economic growth, we need a skilled workforce and businesses need to innovate. Could the parliamentary secretary please tell us what our government is doing to deliver these results?

Economic Development
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Kitchener Centre for his leadership on economic development issues not only in the Waterloo region, but in all of Canada.

A few moments ago in the Waterloo region, the Minister of State for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario announced the new graduate enterprise internship. This is an initiative designed to equip graduate students in science and engineering with real world experience through internships at companies throughout southern Ontario. Not only will this help graduates transition into the workforce, it will also provide businesses with greater access to the technical expertise they need to innovate.

Our government is committed to creating jobs and supporting economic growth in southern Ontario.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Michelle Simson Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Veterans Affairs still has not committed to make his new veterans policy retroactive to include all soldiers wounded since 2006.

The men and women of our armed forces in peacekeeping missions put their lives at risk daily, but the government is only offering lip service.

It is a simple question. Will the plan be retroactive to 2006, or will it exclude the veterans who have returned from the battlefield in the past four years, yes or no?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

West Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Greg Kerr Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I certainly thank the member for her question and assume she will want an answer equally as long as the question, at least.

I do want to point out that we are all very proud of the announcement that was made just a few days ago on behalf of the very important veterans issues that are before us. I know the opposition shares that enthusiasm and support for these initiatives.

Certainly, we look forward to the discussions that will take place that come with the legislative process in which all members will get a chance to contribute in the coming weeks to make sure these extremely important initiatives get out to the veterans as quickly as possible.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Desnoyers Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, this government does not hesitate to spread misinformation to try to justify the absence of a tendering process for the F-35s. Claiming that that model was chosen by the previous government, the Prime Minister is completely misleading the House, because the deals reached with Lockheed Martin did not constitute a promise to purchase.

That being the case, how are we to believe the Prime Minister when he says that Quebec will get its fair share of the economic spin-offs, when he is manipulating the facts?

National Defence
Oral Questions

September 24th, 2010 / 11:55 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, let us review again what took place here. There was a very extensive and rigorous U.S.-led competition that took place between 1997 and 2001 under the previous government. There were two bidders. A competitive process resulted in a prototype aircraft. It was the Liberal government of the day that signed on to the joint strike fighter program in 2002. Following that extensive competition, the F-35 Lightning II was selected.

Since that time, we have now committed to move forward with the MOU to purchase the F-35 which will benefit the Canadian Forces and the Canadian aerospace industry--the Canadian aerospace industry--not one province.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, today the member for Edmonton—Strathcona released a study that shows the oil sands are a bigger environmental disaster than the Conservatives want to admit. Mutant fish, first nations health problems and increased toxins in the water have been linked scientifically to the oil sands. We need to regulate this pollution, start credible monitoring and expedite promised health studies, but the Conservatives continue to do nothing.

Will the government take off its blinders when it comes to the oil sands and start putting the health of northern Canadians first?