House of Commons Hansard #30 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was business.

Topics

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister can fantasize however much he wants after being prompted by some of his colleagues to come up with these fantastic theories.

I just want him to focus for a moment. I know he can do it--

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The member has the right to pose the question.

The hon. member for Toronto Centre.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the question is very simple. Why would you persist in a payroll tax, which everyone in the country knows is a killer of jobs? Why would you persist with a payroll tax just at the moment when unemployment is a big issue?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

I would remind the hon. member to address his questions to the chair and not directly at his colleagues.

The hon. minister of state.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, and so is Christmas coming too, I understand.

I do not like to point out what a former government did, but it is pretty hypocritical to ask a question like that when the Liberals raided the EI fund. There is no polite way to put it; $57 billion was missing. That is money from employees and employers. We would not have had to make any changes to EI if it had not been for their actions.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Robert Chisholm Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government has a track record as a bad negotiator on softwood lumber, on buy America, and I am afraid it is at it again. With respect to the Canada-EU trade negotiation, European officials are saying that Canada would come out a loser. Canadian trade experts are saying that there is not enough in the deal to make it worthwhile.

Why do the Conservatives continue to negotiate bad trade deals that put Canadian jobs at risk?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, our trade negotiation with the European Union is Canada's most important trade initiative since the signing of the historic North American free trade agreement. A trade agreement with the EU will increase Canada's economy by $12 billion and increase two-way trade by 20%. This is an ambitious free trade agreement. It will create jobs and economic growth for Canadians in all regions of the country.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Robert Chisholm Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, unfortunately, that is a wish list. We have to see the government start to stand up for ordinary Canadians. By caving to European pharmaceutical companies, the Conservatives are driving up health care costs by up to $2.8 billion. Many seniors in Dartmouth--Cole Harbour, and across the country, are already having trouble making ends meet. This trade deal would mean that seniors will have an even harder time paying for the drugs that they need.

My question is, why is this out-of-touch government negotiating deals that put the health care of Canadians at risk?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I said earlier that the benefits to Canadians are clear. A trade agreement with the European Union is expected to boost Canada's economy by $12 billion and increase two-way trade by 20%. I would remind the member opposite that this government always protects and advances Canada's interests during international negotiations and will only enter into an agreement that is in the best interests of Canadians.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat Pontiac, QC

Unbelievable, Mr. Speaker. This government is still helping its buddies and is forgetting Canadians. It is completely irresponsible.

The government is getting ready to sign a trade agreement with the European Union that could have serious consequences for Canadians. According to an expert study, if Canada waives patent protection for generic drugs, as the European Union wants, there could be nearly $3 billion in added costs for our health care system.

Why is this government determined to negotiate an agreement that jeopardizes the health of Canadians?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has his facts wrong. Like all of Canada's trade agreements, a free trade agreement with the European Union would exclude public services such as public health, public education, and social services. Canada's trade obligations do not require us to privatize any part of our health care system. The claims to this are simply hogwash.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat Pontiac, QC

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about the facts. Canadians are worried that the Conservatives are giving their friends at the major pharmaceutical companies exclusive rights to data. Those are the facts. Manufacturers of generic drugs face long delays and added costs to get their products on the market. Is that not a double standard?

How will families, who are already struggling to pay for medications, be able to afford them under such conditions?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the member opposite that the government always protects and advances Canada's interests during international negotiations. We will only enter into an agreement that is in Canada's best interests. The benefits to Canada are clear. As I said earlier, a trade agreement with the European Union is expected to boost Canada's economy by $12 billion and increase two-way trade by 20%. Our ambitious pro-trade plan will create jobs and economic growth for Canadians in all regions of the country.

Pensions
Oral Questions

October 17th, 2011 / 2:30 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, a new report by TD Bank shows that seniors in Canada are accumulating debt at a rate faster than other Canadians. With the rising cost of food, home heating, and day-to-day expenses, seniors are struggling to make ends meet. Seniors built this country and deserve to retire with dignity. We need pension reform, long-term care, and affordable home care.

When will the government finally take action and ensure a secure retirement for all seniors?