House of Commons Hansard #34 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was fisheries.

Topics

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Mr. Speaker, I believe that our department and this government have made substantial gains in the fisheries. The programs that we are implementing will make the fishery more efficient, more effective, and better for fishers in the industry. Our programs, and those of search and rescue, are fully subscribed and are working well.

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to media reports, the government now agrees that Quebec should retain its proportional representation in the House. This is what we Liberals insisted had to be changed from the previous plan. Why does the government now want Ontario to lose five seats and B.C. to lose two, while Alberta gains one?

Could the minister assure us that he will release his bill soon enough for the House to examine it in detail, and will he release the population data which should be the basis for seat allocation?

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, as this House well knows, our government has made three distinct commitments. First, we have ensured, or have committed to ensure, that the faster-growing provinces, both now and in the future, will see increased seat representation based on the population. Second, we have committed to ensure that our smaller provinces will be protected from losing any seats. Finally, we have committed to ensure fair and proportional representation in the province of Quebec according to its population.

Those are the commitments we have made and those are the commitments we will honour.

Justice
Oral Questions

October 21st, 2011 / 11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, everyone knows that mandatory minimum penalties remove a judge's discretionary power to determine an appropriate sentence based on the crime and the circumstances. Yesterday, the Quebec bar said that it would not allow Parliament to do that to our society.

Will the government stop wasting billions of dollars on an approach that is bound to fail and that will only lead to more crime, less justice and skyrocketing costs?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe
New Brunswick

Conservative

Robert Goguen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian public gave us a mandate to protect them against violent young offenders. That is something new. All the measures in this legislation that aims to protect Canadians will respect the rights of young offenders and of Quebeckers, and will also protect Canadian society against dangerous reoffenders. That is what we were asked to do and that is what we will do. We are asking for the support of the opposition.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Frank Valeriote Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives thought they could get away with their anti-democratic attack on western Canadian family farms with no fuss. Funny how people react when the government ignores them.

Protests against the Conservative plan to kill the single desk system by farmers today in Saskatchewan will lead to more next week in the face of the government's false claims that farmers support its ideological plan. Farmers do not support killing small farms and small town economies.

Is the minister now planning to ignore their cries from the farms and streets of the Prairies?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, this legislation would deliver on our government's long-standing commitment to bring marketing choice and freedom to western Canadian farmers. Once passed, the bill would allow prairie farmers to seek their own contracts for grains through the open market. The Wheat Board is going to remain a voluntary pooling option for Canadian farmers.

We hope that the opposition will not drag this out. We know that the chairman of the Wheat Board has said that he wants the opposition to drag it out, which would completely disrupt the markets. That is totally irresponsible. We do not want to see that happen. We hope that the opposition is not going to join with that kind of irresponsibility.

We are looking out for prairie farmers. Would the opposition join with us in doing that?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency confirmed that the agency will face $13 million in cuts next year. That is 43% of its budget gone. That is one-third of its staff gone. The agency's job is to look into potentially harmful policies and projects before they get the green light.

The government has abandoned environmental protection. How can the agency do its job properly with huge cuts to staff and programs?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our government is taking concrete action to protect Canada's environment. With regard to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, budget 2007 provided $11 million in additional funding for the agency to take on more responsibilities related to the review of major resource projects.

The agency was one of six departments funded to deliver on a new government mandate to improve the regulatory process for major resource projects. The funding was time limited so that the government could assess at the end of the five years whether it was generating the intended results. We look forward to the findings of this committee.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency plays a crucial role. Investments worth $500 million are planned for natural resource projects, yet this government is strangling the agency that oversees those projects. Now the agency's managers are worried about the amount of work that lies ahead.

Is the government's economic projection false, or does the government prefer to let industry do what it wants without worrying about the environment?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we provided additional funding to this agency in budget 2007. It was a five-year funding process, which we are reviewing right now, and we look forward to the committee's findings.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, EU nations are worried, and with good reason, about the environmental impact of the oil sands. While the minister prefers to do nothing, the gap between greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for 2020 and the reality is 75%.

Why is the minister not focusing his efforts on reaching those reduction targets instead of attacking the European Union's fuel quality directive?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, our first interest, of course, is in protecting the Canadian economy, Canadian jobs and the environment at the same time. We are committed to working with all levels of government and industry to ensure that the oil sands are developed in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner. It is a strategic resource in our country. Currently, 390,000 jobs are tied to and supported by oil sands development.

I wish the opposition would join with us in supporting Canadian jobs, supporting the Canadian economy and helping us move ahead in the future.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is no surprise that the government is in denial, but the facts are clear. The government has failed to properly understand and regulate the environmental impacts of oil sands development. It has weakened its climate change targets by 90% since 2007 and its inaction has given Canada a black eye on the world stage.

When will the government take climate change seriously at home instead of attacking our allies abroad?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, we are protecting the Canadian economy and the Canadian environment.

One of the things that really concerns me is how the NDP members do not seem to be able to be united on any of these issues. We have heard them contradict each other on the shipbuilding process. We have heard them contradicting each other on the merit of Supreme Court justices. We have heard them contradict each other on marketing freedom for western Canadian farmers. We have heard them contradict each other in terms of the merger with the Liberals.

The opposition does not have credibility on this issue. We will continue to represent Canada. We will continue to build the Canadian economy and we look forward to a bright future.