House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was firearms.

Topics

Public Safety Officers Compensation Fund
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, for 14 years, Canada's firefighters have been coming to Parliament Hill to ask that their families be taken care of through a public safety officer compensation fund if they die in the line of duty or if they die saving others.

Five years ago, the NDP delivered, and we passed legislation through the House directing the government to do this. Since that time, dozens of Canada's firefighters and police officers have passed away, and their families are often left destitute. The United States has a fund, but Canada does not.

Why will the government not establish a public safety officer compensation fund and why is it showing such profound disrespect to Canada's firefighters and police officers?

Public Safety Officers Compensation Fund
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, this is a government that is listening to firefighters and police officers across the country. Not only are we giving police officers the tools they need to do their job, but we also introduced a firefighters volunteer tax credit which has been supported across the country. It is something firefighters asked for. It is helping them. We respect and appreciate the work they do. We will continue to support them.

We ask the opposition to do the same thing. We ask the opposition members to vote for measures that will keep criminals in jail and not out on the street.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, our government's top priority is to complete the economic recovery and protect and create Canadian jobs. Broadening and expanding access to more markets, particularly Asia, is a key part of our government's job creating pro-trade plan. Canadians get the jobs, the prosperity and consumer benefits that come from increased trade.

Could the parliamentary secretary explain why the Asia-Pacific gateway is so critical to our job-creating pro-trade plan? What is happening to ensure that happens?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, our government's focus is to create jobs and increase prosperity for hard-working Canadians. As part of the Asia-Pacific gateway, our government announced strategic infrastructure projects worth over $3.5 billion, including federal contributions of over $1.4 billion.

Our approach is winning praise. For example, Linda Styrk, the Port of Seattle's managing director, said: “Canada has done a fabulous job putting together a national strategy to increase the flow of trade and create more jobs”. We agree with her.

We will continue to support the Asia-Pacific gateway because it increases trade, creates jobs and boosts overall transportation--

International Trade
Oral Questions

Noon

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Beauport—Limoilou.

Tourism Industry
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Raymond Côté Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government could end up depriving the Canadian economy of millions of dollars in tourism spinoffs, because tourists from the countries for which Canada requires a visa must go through a completely arbitrary process. Every year, one out of every five visitors is denied entry to the country. There are no clear criteria, guidelines or standards for granting entry.

What is this government doing to make the tourist visa process fairer?

Tourism Industry
Oral Questions

Noon

Beauce
Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier Minister of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, I am happy that my counterpart is interested in tourism. This industry is very important to Canada. I want to say that we are working with the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism to ensure that our visa process is effective. I just got back from China, where I met with my counterparts over there. I can say that Canada has a very competitive process for granting visas to foreign visitors, compared to what is done elsewhere.

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

Noon

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Conservatives introduced a bill that would irreversibly decrease Quebec's political weight. The Quebeckers in this House have an obligation to object to this assault on the Quebec nation and denounce the bill.

The National Assembly has spoken out three times and Quebec's minister of intergovernmental affairs has made it clear, “...there is an exceptional consensus; Quebec does not want to see its weight decreased.”

Will the government respect the Quebec nation and correct its bill in order to maintain Quebec's current political weight?

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

Noon

Edmonton—Sherwood Park
Alberta

Conservative

Tim Uppal Minister of State (Democratic Reform)

Mr. Speaker, we have introduced principled legislation that is fair for all provinces. Quebec has 23% of the population and will have 23% of the seats in the House of Commons.

The fair representation act would bring every single province closer to representation by population. We on this side of the House are governing for all Canadians.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's responses to seven petitions.

Procedure and House Affairs
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

October 28th, 2011 / noon

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 8th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Pursuant to Standing Order 92(3)(a), the committee hereby reports that it has concurred in the report of the subcommittee on private members' business advising that Bill C-292, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (victims' restitution and monetary awards for offenders), should be designated non-votable.

Condemnation of Russian Corruption Act
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-339, An Act to condemn corruption and impunity in Russia in the case and death of Sergei Magnitsky.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table a bill entitled an act to condemn corruption and impunity in Russia in the case and death of Sergei Magnitsky.

The tragic torture and death in detention of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who uncovered the largest tax fraud in Russian history and paid for it with his life, is a looking glass into the pervasive culture of corruption and impunity implicating senior government officials in Russia today.

The bill notes that no objective official investigation has been conducted by the Russian government into the Magnitsky case, despite extensive documented evidence incriminating Russian officials in serious human rights violations, in the embezzlement of funds from the Russian treasury, and in the retaliation against Mr. Magnitsky, nor have the individual persons been identified, apprehended and brought to justice in Russia.

Accordingly, this bill establishes a process by which the Canadian government must prepare a list of individuals responsible for the torture and death of Sergei Magnitsky, for the conspiracy to defraud the Russian federation of taxes paid by the foreign investment company known as Hermitage, and for efforts to shield those culpable of those gross violations of human rights. It imposes restrictions on the listed individuals and their family members, such that they are inadmissible for the purposes of entering or remaining in Canada.

The ongoing impunity, and indeed, in this instance shocking impunity, regarding Russian officials is as scandalous as it is shocking. This legislation would uphold the rule of law, would assure Russian human rights defenders that they are not alone, would protect Canadian business interests in Russia, and in particular would remember and honour the heroic sacrifice of Sergei Magnitsky. He acted on behalf of all of us in his protection of the rule of law.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Passenger Rail Service
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Bruce Hyer Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure of presenting a petition on behalf of the residents of Rossport, Terrace Bay and Schreiber in support of restoring vital passenger rail service that was cut in the late 1980s.

The petitioners note that rail is both environmentally friendly and efficient. Returning passenger rail to one of the most spectacular routes in the country, along the north shore of Lake Superior through Thunder Bay, would be a huge boost to north shore communities and to rail tourism alike.

The petitioners are asking for MPs to support Motion No. 263 to return passenger rail along the beautiful north shore of Lake Superior to Thunder Bay and beyond.

Human Rights
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, I present a petition in which 30 Canadians from Saskatchewan and Ontario want the government to ensure the Holodomor and Canada's first national internment operations are permanently and prominently displayed at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg.

Shark Finning
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is my honour to present petitions with 753 signatures from across Canada. The petitions were started by people within Saanich—Gulf Islands who are concerned about the fate of sharks globally because of the single practice of killing the shark to obtain the fin to make shark fin soup.

Earlier this week, Toronto City Council took decisive action and voted at the municipal level, as many other municipalities are now doing, to ban shark fins. This petition asks that this House look at the issue. I hope that we will also see a private member's bill on this matter.