House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was firearms.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, it appears the government has already begun to move. Here is what the Minister of National Defence had to say this week, “In an ideal world, I know nuclear subs are what's needed--”.

We can all agree the Liberals did a terrible job when they bought the Victoria class subs. Canadians were misled about their true costs and capabilities. What Canadians wanted then and what they want today is certainty.

Would the Conservatives confirm that their government is really ready to go down a multi-billion dollar rabbit hole of nuclear submarines?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the quick answer to that is, no. I think the hon. member has to be wary of relying unduly on misleading reports from the CBC.

What is true is that our government is investing in the right mix and balance for our forces to have a naval capacity necessary to defend and protect Canada's sovereignty on all our ocean frontiers.

I can tell members and reassure the hon. member that there is no plan to replace the diesel-electric fleet purchased by the Liberals.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, it seems quite clear that the Conservatives have absolutely no plans for military procurement. This situation with the submarine fleet reeks of improvisation. In terms of our air force, the Conservatives' decision to purchase F-35s is making less and less sense. Even the government is starting to realize it.

Will the government reconsider its untendered purchase of F-35s?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, our commitment has been, clearly, to give our Canadian Forces members, including those in the Royal Canadian Air Force, the equipment they need to do the job well. The fact is, and reasonable people agree, we need to have new aircraft. The current CF-18s are, of course, aging aircraft that have been around for quite some time.

We are moving forward, together with our allies, with the only fifth generation fighter of its kind. The F-35 is something that offers stealth capability and will protect our Canadian airmen and airwomen, so that they will be able to do their job protecting our sovereignty in the safest and most effective fashion possible.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the pressure is mounting against the purchase of F-35s. Today, we learned that the Minister of National Defence is increasingly offside from other cabinet members and the Prime Minister's Office. Why? Because the F-35 does not work in the Arctic and is plagued by delays. It is wildly over budget, and the list goes on and on.

Will the government finally stop its F-35 boondoggle before it is just too late?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the only boondoggle I know about these days is the gun registry.

However, I am pleased to infuse a dose of reality into the opposition's misguided rant about F-35 aircraft. Recently, I saw first-hand the direct benefits of economic growth and job creation in Magellan Bristol Aerospace in Winnipeg as with over 60-some other Canadians companies.

Canadian families are benefiting from the production in Canada of F-35 components. Our budget is on track. It will create economic growth as well as look after the needs of our men and women in uniform and Canadian sovereignty.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

David Christopherson Hamilton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would feel a bit defensive, too, if I signed on to a program that even conservative U.S. senator John McCain called “a train wreck”. Even our international partners, such as Australia, Israel and Turkey, are now delaying their commitment to the F-35s.

When will the Conservatives finally admit their F-35 boondoggle is quickly unravelling and bring it to an end?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the infusion of rhetoric on this very important acquisition of an asset critical to the sovereignty of Canada, providing our men and women the appropriate tools well into the future to do their job, is absolutely overwhelming. It is obviously because of political positioning.

We are focused on what is necessary to maintain Canada's sovereignty. We are not playing politics. This is a critical asset that we intend to fulfill as we go forward.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

October 28th, 2011 / 11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Massimo Pacetti Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Quebec National Assembly voted in favour of a motion calling on the government to grant access to the information in the firearms registry. Why will this government not recognize that this information is very valuable to the provinces and why does it still refuse to give in to common sense?

I will ask the government once more here today. Is the government willing to make this valuable information available to the provinces?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, our legislation is clear. It will actually eliminate the long gun registry, and that means eliminating the records, which have become inaccurate and unreliable, and they will become increasingly so over time.

We are bound to protect the privacy rights of Canadians and that includes the rights of those who are law-abiding gun owners who have participated in the registry. The existing licensing requirements, of course, are going to remain.

We are committed to eliminating this wasteful and ineffective long gun registry. We will not allow a backdoor re-establishment of the long gun registry.

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, TD Bank said yesterday what we all knew already, that the government will not balance its books until 2017, after the next election.

This is bad news for Canadian families, who have been told they had to wait until the budget was balanced for any of the government's promised support for families.

Why do Canadian families have to wait in line for six years to receive any support while the largest, most profitable corporations in the country get their tax cuts right now?

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, my Liberal friend opposite has a very short memory.

We delivered tax cuts for Canadian families in the form of lowering income taxes, in the form of tax reductions for things like a sports and fitness tax credit, and participation in the arts tax credit. We reduced the GST twice.

What all those events had in common was that the Liberal Party voted against them. Our party is the only party committed to reducing taxes. We continue to be the only party in this House committed to reducing taxes.

We are also committed to getting our budget balanced in the medium term to ensure that we keep Canada's fiscal advantage, one that has delivered 650,000 net new jobs to Canadians and is leading the G8 in growth.

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, it makes no sense for these Conservatives to delay support for families until after the next election when, with any luck, they will be out of power. Also, Canadians are going to wake up to a nasty surprise on January 1, an EI payroll tax increase.

Could the government explain by what twisted logic Canadian families must wait and watch while the government levies a massive tax on jobs and refuses to provide them with any support?

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, Canadian families did wait for help in the form of reduced taxes for 13 long years.

However, since 2006, they have been receiving those benefits from our government, benefits that now total, for a typical Canadian family, over $3,000 less in taxes paid. That is over $3,000 more in their pockets. That is one of the reasons the Canadian economy has been performing well.

We have avoided the path that the Liberals would have us go, the path that other countries are on--that of high taxes, high debt and high deficit it is the very path that is causing threats to the global economy from elsewhere.

Here in Canada, we have avoided that path. That is why our economy is strong, and we will say on that path.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the reckless and spiteful decision to destroy all gun registry records shows just how out of touch the government really is. Yesterday, the Quebec National Assembly voted unanimously to demand the records be kept. It is even threatening legal action.

The government is not just destroying records, it is destroying a key tool for keeping our communities safe.

Why is the government insulting provinces that want to create their own registry? Why is it playing politics with public safety?