House of Commons Hansard #49 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Until now, the government's approach has not been very constructive. Yesterday, all of a sudden, they saw the light. It seems that there is now a small opening.

Since statistics show that Canada's crime rate is declining, will the government commit to taking the necessary time to examine the bill? Are the Conservatives prepared to consider amendments in order to help communities invest in front-line police services rather than forcing the provinces to hire prison guards?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Madam Speaker, we have already added resources to hire more RCMP officers and provincial and municipal police officers. We have already invested more in community crime prevention programs.

In fact, 77% of Quebeckers expect Parliament to adopt stricter laws and tougher penalties for criminals, and that is what the government is doing.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, we can all agree that the government's heavy-handed approach has not helped to elevate public discourse and certainly has not helped to make Parliament work.

The Conservatives have used closure seven times in 25 sitting days and countless times at committees.

Shutting down debate is no way to operate for a government rejected by 60% of Canadian voters.

Will the Conservatives put an end to the repeated use of closures and let MPs do their work?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Madam Speaker, by the same strange math, over 80% of Canadians voted against the NDP. They voted against the soft-on-crime, high-tax, job-killing agenda of the NDP. They voted for a government that will focus on job creation and safe communities. That is what we are delivering through our platform commitments.

We, of course, are committed to debate. These two bills, the budget implementation act and the crime omnibus bill, have received 48 hours of debate in this place and 152 speeches. Many of these items have been debated repeatedly in different sessions of this Parliament.

We are committed to debate but we are also committed to acting and keeping our platform commitments.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Madam Speaker, yesterday, the government finally agreed to delay ramming Bill C-10 through committee to allow at least some debate, which is a good sign, but now the government must take the next step.

Will the government agree, not only to stop ramming this behemoth of a crime bill through, but to allow a meaningful debate and agree to reasonable amendments, like the ones suggested by groups such as the Canadian Bar Association, legal experts and the provinces?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East
B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Madam Speaker, Canadians are concerned about crime, which is why they gave our government a strong mandate to keep our streets and communities safe. We need to keep that focus.

The opposition wants to punish law-abiding duck hunters and farmers but oppose tougher sentences for pedophiles and drug dealers.

The fact is that Parliament has already seen and debated the measures contained in Bill C-10. Over the course of the past four years, the justice committee has had 67 days, which was 139 hours of discussions, 95 hours of debate, 261 speeches and 363 witness appearances.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Madam Speaker, the Conservatives used to complain about Liberal arrogance but the behaviour of the Conservative government makes Liberal arrogance look like humility.

The government can do things differently. New Democrats are reasonable people. We have constructive amendments to bring forward based on what we heard at committee, including those proposed by the province of Quebec.

What was not reasonable was to shut down debate, limit time and refuse to work with others. It is not what Canadians want.

Will the Conservatives agree to listen to Canadians and change their ill-advised, prison-based crime agenda?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East
B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Madam Speaker, the time for talk is over. The time for action is now. By moving quickly to reintroduce these measures to make our streets and communities safer, we are taking action, as we committed to do. Our focus is to meet the promises we made and to stand up for all law-abiding Canadians.

I was in those same meetings yesterday and the hon. member was the one who moved the amendment to agree to time allocation to get this done by Wednesday at midnight, and we appreciate his co-operation.

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, as we all know, ever since Parliament opened in September, this government has not stopped showing its contempt for parliamentary democracy, either by constantly trying to limit debate on bills or by using secrecy and intimidation tactics in committee. Having a majority does not entitle the government to abuse its power.

When is this government going to change?

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Madam Speaker, on the contrary, on two important bills—one on the budget and the other on crime—we had 152 hours of debate and 48 speeches. During previous sessions in the past few Parliaments, there have been many debates on a number of bills. At the end of the day, the government has a mandate from Canadians, who expect the government and Parliament to get moving on implementing our economic action plan and our bills to protect communities from crime. That is what we are going to do.

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, being in power also means working with the provinces. Over the past week we have seen this government's attitude toward Quebec. We have seen how the Conservatives are dealing with Bill C-10 and jeopardizing Quebec's approach to rehabilitation. We saw how this government dealt with Minister Dutil, who was told that the firearms registry database will not be available.

Working in our country, within this confederation, also requires working with the provinces. When are they going to do that?

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Madam Speaker, this government has an extraordinary record when it comes to federal-provincial relations. That is why we have seen an extraordinary decline in support for separation in Quebec. Quebec has received a 60% increase in its federal transfers. Quebeckers expect Parliament to legislate harsher sentences for criminals. In fact, 77% of Quebeckers expect that and we are going to deliver. We are going to deliver a fairer justice system for Quebeckers and Canadians.

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, the arrogance of the government knows absolutely no bounds. It is limiting debate and pig-headedly refusing to work with the provinces. This week, one minister from Quebec said that this was not a government that was tough on crime, that this was a government that was tough on democracy.

Yesterday, in committee, a Conservative member told people that police representatives were misrepresenting the truth.

When will the Conservatives stop acting like bullies and act in a responsible manner in this democratic country?

Democracy
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

The real question, Madam Speaker, is when will the Liberal Party finally learn the lesson of the last election. Canadians want parliamentarians to stand up for victims of crime rather than criminals. When will the Liberals understand that 77% of Quebeckers say that there should be more serious penal sentences for criminals? When will the Liberal Party understand that it is unacceptable to Canadians that too many repeat and even violent criminals end up with house arrest or go through the revolving door of bail?

Canadians believe that serious criminals should do serious time. We agree with Canadians and we will act to ensure that happens.

Pension Plans
Oral Questions

November 18th, 2011 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre Alfred-Pellan, QC

Madam Speaker, more and more Canadians are wondering if they will be able to retire one day. For example, I know of a retired nurse in my riding who has a pension of only $520 per month. She cannot even afford her diabetes medication or her mortgage and she is racking up debt.

With the Conservatives' new plan, retired Canadians would be risking their savings by putting them in a flawed program, without any guarantee of seeing their money again.

Instead, why not improve government pension plans such as the CPP and QPP, which are affordable and safe?