House of Commons Hansard #57 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-10.

Topics

Finance
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Finance
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Conservative

James Rajotte Edmonton—Leduc, AB

(Motion agreed to)

Child Care
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have one petition with many signatures on it to do with child care. The petitioners indicate that child care is often not accessible or affordable for Canadian families and is often of uncertain quality for young children. They indicate that child care creates jobs, makes Canada more competitive, helps achieve women's equality, builds local economies, and is a recognized human right.

The petitioners are calling on the House of Commons to legislate the right to universal access to child care and provide multi-year funding to provincial and territorial governments to build a national system of affordable, high-quality public and not-for-profit early childhood education and care accessible to all children.

The federal government must establish funding criteria and reporting mechanisms that ensure accountability for how the provinces and territories use federal funding to ensure quality, accessibility, universality and accountability, and that acknowledges Quebec's right to develop social programs with adequate compensation from the federal government.

Child Pornography
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Conservative

Royal Galipeau Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, unfortunately the scourge of child pornography has become more widespread with the advent of the Internet.

While serving as trustee of the Ottawa Public Library, I fought, with success, to protect children from Internet pornography. In fact, our local solution became the pan-Canadian model promoted by the Canadian Library Association.

This afternoon, I would like to bring to your attention a petition signed by more than 5,000 Canadians from across Canada, asking Parliament to pass harsher laws to deal with people who abuse our children.

Statistics indicate that 39% of criminals with child pornography in their possession have images of children between the ages of three and five. Furthermore, 83% of these criminals have images that show children between the ages of six and twelve being sexually abused.

At present, section 163 of the Criminal Code of Canada imposes negligible minimum sentences such as 90 days imprisonment for making child pornography. For possession of such materials, a criminal may be sentenced to only 14 days in jail.

With this petition, Canadians are demanding higher minimum sentences to protect our children, fight pedophilia and provide more justice.

Safe Streets and Communities Legislation
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table a petition wherein the signatories express their concern that the bundling together of nine separate bills in one omnibus bill, Bill C-10, prevents the informed consideration that each bill independently warrants.

They further express concern that the costs for implementing these bills have not been properly assessed, and that the provinces of Quebec and Ontario have expressed their refusal to pay for these measures. The petitioners call upon Parliament to separate the bills and allow members to consider each of the bills separately.

The Environment
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Conservative

David Tilson Dufferin—Caledon, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition signed by a number of people from all over Ontario.

The petitioners are concerned about a proposed mega quarry in Melancthon township in Dufferin country. It would be the largest open-pit quarry in Canada, being 2,300 acres. They are concerned about a number of things included in the proposed mega quarry application, one being that there are distinct issues relating to the use of water operations based on NAFTA considerations, which may have a very substantial negative financial implication federally and provincially.

The petitioners have asked that the Government of Canada conduct an environmental assessment, under the authority of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, on The Highland Companies' proposed mega quarry development.

Crime
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Ted Hsu Kingston and the Islands, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present again a petition signed by Canadians from across British Columbia. It concerns Bill C-10.

The petitioners say that the omnibus crime bill crudely bundles together too many pieces of unrelated legislation, some of it makes sense and some of it does not. They say that there is a big problem with implementation because the provinces of Ontario and Quebec may refuse to pay for the cost of implementing parts of the bill which would be downloaded on them.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to separate Bill C-10 into its pieces and allow members to vote on each of its parts separately.

The Environment
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, this may be my last opportunity to rise on the subject of climate change before leaving for Durban in the next day. I will be gone from the House for a while.

It is my honour to present a petition from residents of Quebec and Alberta who are very concerned about the costs of the climate crisis, costs that are not being adequately considered but which have been estimated by the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy to be $5 billion per year by 2020, rising to up to $43 billion per year by 2050. As my hon. colleague, the member for Kingston and the Islands, put it so eloquently in his question earlier today, these will be costs that we will pass on to our children.

The petitioners call for real targets, real reductions, as were passed by the House in the last session: 25% below 1990 levels by 2020 and 80% below 1990 levels by 2050.

Multiple Sclerosis
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present two petitions today.

The first petition is with regard CCSVI. Over 15,000 procedures have now been performed in 60 countries. While the government has announced a request for proposals for phase I/II trials, leading CCSVI physicians and researchers in North America recommend an adaptive phase II/III trial. Eighteen months have passed since our initial request for clinical trials. On average, 400 Canadians die of MS each year. By the end of this year, 800 Canadians will have died from MS-related complications or suicide.

The petitioners call for the Minister of Health to consult experts actively engaged in diagnoses and treatment of CCSVI to undertake phase III clinical trials on an urgent basis, with a large patient participation in multiple centres across Canada, and to require follow-up care.

The Environment
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the second petition is with regard the atmospheric ozone layer, which is critical to life on Earth, through its regulation of ultraviolet radiation from the sun.

Canada participated in the eighth meeting of the Ozone research managers of the parties to the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer in May 2011. Its presentation said that balloonsonde networks provided critical high-resolution vertical profiles of ozone, water vapour, and temperature, and needed to be maintained and expanded, since such data was critical to understanding the interactions between atmospheric composition and a changing climate.

The petitioners therefore call upon the Minister of the Environment to develop a plan to ensure the integrity of the ozone monitoring program and commission a report to assess the adequacy of Canadian contributions to the global observing system for climate in support of the UN FCCC.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

November 30th, 2011 / 3:30 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Question No. 175 could be made an order for return, this return would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Question No. 175
Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

With regard to public subsidies to federal political parties and political contributions: (a) what was the total value given for calendar year 2010 as a part of the so-called “per vote subsidy” (also sometimes referred to as the "government allowance") to the (i) Conservative Party of Canada, (ii) New Democratic Party of Canada, (iii) Liberal Party of Canada, (iv) Green Party of Canada, (v) Bloc Québécois; (b) what was the total value given following the 2008 general election under the electoral expense reimbursement (also sometimes referred to as "government rebates", "government transfers", or "election rebates") including both the total national expense reimbursements received and the total riding expense reimbursements received to the (i) Conservative Party of Canada and candidates, (ii) New Democratic Party of Canada and candidates, (iii) Liberal Party of Canada and candidates, (iv) Green Party of Canada and candidates, (v) Bloc Québécois and candidates; (c) what was the total value given in calendar year 2010 via the personal income tax credit subsidy of political contributions as per the Income Tax Act to the (i) Conservative Party of Canada donors, (ii) New Democratic Party of Canada donors, (iii) Liberal Party of Canada donors, (iv) Green Party of Canada donors, (v) Bloc Québécois donors; (d) what percentage of the total amount paid out via the “per vote subsidy” went to the Conservative Party of Canada compared to all other registered political parties; (e) what percentage of the total amount paid out via the electoral expense reimbursements went to the Conservative Party of Canada and candidates thereof compared to all other registered political parties and candidates thereof; (f) what percentage of the total amount paid out via the personal income tax credit subsidy of political contributions went to Conservative Party of Canada donors compared to donors to all other registered political parties; and (g) which of the three aforementioned political subsidies to political parties has the government announced it intends to eliminate?

(Return tabled)