House of Commons Hansard #67 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was infrastructure.

Topics

Government Accountability
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, our government is always performing in an open and accountable fashion. We did this in the last election when we made clear commitments to Canadians about what we would deliver on. We would deliver for the economy, for jobs and for economic growth. We would deliver on tackling crime. That is exactly what we have been doing in the House every day when we have been here working hard.

I know the leader of the other party decided the session ended yesterday and he has checked out, but we happen to believe we have work to do here and that is what we are doing today.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week we watched the sorry spectacle of the Minister of National Defence trying to cover up for his inappropriate use of a search and rescue helicopter.

Last month, the Associate Minister of Defence said, categorically, that training of the F-35s would be done in Canada. Yesterday the chief of air defence said that they would be trained in Florida for up to a decade. For the benefit of the associate minister, Florida is not in Canada.

For just once will the ministers honourably provide the House with all the details of the F-35 program and training?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, both the chief of air staff and I have been clear. We are planning for long-term F-35 training to take place in Canada, just as currently is done with the CF-18s.

The vast majority of Canadian F-35 pilots will be training in Canada. It is reasonable that Canadians will do initial training with those from whom we purchased the aircraft, which has always been the case.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, by calling the Kyoto protocol “stupid”, the Prime Minister is neglecting future generations. It is unacceptable to see the Conservatives sabotage international efforts and cause job losses here in Canada.

Instead of talking nonsense and tarnishing Canada's image, will this government do what the rest of the world is expecting and come up with a real plan for the environment and act like a leader in the fight against climate change?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, Canada would have preferred a more ambitious result from the global climate change conference, but we do believe we have an agreement which builds upon Copenhagen and Cancun.

I know my hon. critic loves to quote from the pre-eminent scientific journal Nature when it suits her, but I would remind her that last month Nature wrote, “Like it or not, a dogmatic adherence to the protocol is now a political liability that threatens cooperative action to actually effect action climate change”.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the international community is watching us. China, France, the UN have all criticized the Conservatives for pulling out of Kyoto. Is the Prime Minister going to call them stupid as well? Is he going to acknowledge the real reason the government is withdrawing from Kyoto, and that is to hide its failure and its job-killing inaction on climate?

The rest of the world is moving forward, building a new energy economy, but Canada is being left behind under the Conservatives' inaction. Why are they refusing to act?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, if my hon. colleague had been in Durban, she would have seen that Canada was among the leaders in the—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. We can deal with this after question period.

The hon. Minister of the Environment has the floor.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Thornhill, ON

As I was saying, Mr. Speaker, if my hon. colleague had not sent a deputy to attend in Durban, she would have seen first-hand how Canada did lead the way in contributing to the creation of the Durban platform.

Again, I would remind her and refer her to Nature, which says, “There is no need to kill Kyoto. The treaty is already weakened and will prove hard to revive”.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Kennedy Stewart Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government is gung-ho on building new pipelines and shipping value-added jobs right out of Canada.

Yesterday's report from the environment commissioner revealed that the Conservatives could not even safely manage the pipelines we had now. When a company is caught breaking the rules, over 90% of the time nothing happens and the problem is not fixed.

Before rushing forward with new pipelines, why will the government not fix the safety monitoring problems with existing pipelines?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the National Energy Board is a solid independent regulatory body that ensures the safety of the pipelines.

The NEB instituted corrective action that would address the recommendations. It has undertaken to review the emergency preparedness manuals that deal with the 5% that it did not already deal with, which is the lower risk portion. It has also launched an action plan that focuses on workers' safety, integrity of installations and damage prevention.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, southern Albertans have petitioned the House, calling on the government to call a halt to gas fracking on lands controlled by the federal government.

First nation women are being criminally prosecuted for attempting to block fracking trucks from entering the lands of the Kainai blood tribe. They worry that fracking threatens their scarce surface water and groundwater reserves. A just released USEPA study indicates these concerns may be well-founded.

When will the government finally start acting on its duty to regulate the impact of industrial developments on first nation lands?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, this government is highly concerned about protecting the environment both on federal lands and other. I would remind my hon. colleague that shale gas is principally a responsibility of the provincial and territorial governments.

The Economy
Oral Questions

December 14th, 2011 / 2:35 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, this government is pathetic. Canadian families are carrying record debt loads under the Conservatives. Workers' wages have fallen by 2% over the last year, and 90,000 Canadian families had their livelihoods taken away this fall. And what is this government doing? It is giving the oil companies and banks a lovely gift on January 1, while hiking EI premiums for families.

Why is this government giving Bay Street another big Christmas present? Why is it giving Canadian families a lump of coal in their stockings?