House of Commons Hansard #64 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was women.

Topics

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Sylvain Chicoine Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, QC

Mr. Speaker, the agreement concluded this week between the United States and Canada raises a lot more questions than it answers. Canadians are worried. They want to know exactly what this agreement means for them and their families. They want to know what information will be shared with the Americans and how long the information will remain on file in the United States. They also want to know whether their right to privacy will be respected.

Can this secretive government promise to answer Canadians' questions? Can it tell us what it intends to do to protect Canadians' rights?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this agreement is all about jobs, economic growth and trade with the United States. I know our NDP friends do not support free trade with the United States.

Why does the member opposite not trust Barack Obama, the president of the United States? Why does the member believe that he will do malicious things with information? That is really surprising.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Raymond Côté Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, every time they sign an agreement, Canadians get the short end of the stick. This agreement will necessarily have repercussions on tourists who come to Canada every year. Is this going to complicate their lives? We do not know. Is this going to cost them a lot of money? We do not know. Is this going to discourage them from coming to Canada? We have no idea.

Can the Conservatives be transparent for once and tell us what impact this agreement will have on the thousands of restaurants, hotels and small businesses that rely on tourism?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have been very transparent. We have tabled the entire agreement, the entire action plan that will help to create jobs and opportunities, right here in the House of Commons.

We have seen a decline in the number of tourists in many border communities since 9/11 and since the passport requirements. What this will do is make it easier for more Americans, our biggest market for tourism, to come to Niagara Falls, more Americans to come to Vancouver, more Americans to visit Quebec City and more Americans to visit the Maritimes.

We are very pleased with that. The tourism industry is excited about this initiative. We will continue to move forward and create more jobs.

Taxation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, while our Conservative government is committed to promoting jobs with the next phase of Canada's economic action plan, the tax-and-spend NDP does not agree.

As Canadian families prepare for the Christmas season, the NDP is publicly demanding that new tax after new tax be imposed on families. It demands that we take more and more money out of the pockets of Canadians through higher taxes to pay for its tax-and-spend schemes.

Would the Minister of Finance please tell Canadians why our government rejects the NDP tax-and-spend approach?

Taxation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, in answer to the last question, the Minister of Foreign Affairs missed one important point. The NDP not only vote against every trade deal that we have put forward, it opposes every trade negotiation. Those trade negotiations create jobs in this country. The flow of people and goods across that border is so important.

What we are solely focused on is ensuring we create jobs within this country. Trade is supportive of that but the policies that we put forward, which have created almost 600,000 net new jobs in this country, those are results for Canadians, which is what Canadians asked for.

Rural Airports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government believes that it can pull the wool over the eyes of honest rural Canadians, sucker punch them, and then get away with it. Power corrupts.

Canadians learned the government is planning a fire sale of vital rural Canadian assets. On the chopping block are rural airports serving our most remote communities. These airports are a lifeline for Canadians living in small towns and rural communities from coast to coast to coast.

Why is the government abandoning rural Canadians?

Rural Airports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, as announced in budget 2009, a review of corporate assets is being led by the greatest Minister of Finance in the world in collaboration with other fantastic ministers who are looking at various assets, including within the Department of Transport. Our government is committed to using hard-earned tax dollars in a way that is prudent and responsible.

That member should support the government.

Rural Airports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, what is worse than the government's empty answers and denials is that the secret documents that revealed the fire sale are blanked out. Canadians are left wondering which of our rural communities will be affected--

Rural Airports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. There are far too many cross-conversations. I am having difficulty hearing the member for Vaudreuil--Soulanges. If members want to talk to each other, maybe they can do so outside of the chamber.

The hon. member for Vaudreuil--Soulanges.

Rural Airports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are left wondering which of our rural communities will be affected by these closures. Canadians do not even know what other rural assets are being sold off because the government refuses to tell them.

Will the government come clean and tell these honest folk in rural communities which rural communities will lose out?

Rural Airports
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to ensuring that taxpayers have the best value for their money. We want to ensure that government assets are used for the benefit of Canadians. If they do not benefit Canadians, the government will allow the assets to go to other people who will act for the benefit of Canadians.

The member should understand that the government should not own everything. If this member wanted it, the government would own all of the businesses and all the land in the entire country. That is wrong.

Local Newspapers
Oral Questions

December 9th, 2011 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Ruth Ellen Brosseau Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, the new aid to publishers program has completely missed the mark. Rather than helping local newspapers, it is pushing them into bankruptcy. There are no daily newspapers in a number of regions across the country. Weekly newspapers are an important source of information for the residents of these communities. We know that 75% of Canadians read their local papers every week.

Will the government promise to restore assistance to 2009 levels to protect regional newspapers?

Local Newspapers
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague knows, Canada Post decided to discontinue its $15 million investment for periodicals and community newspapers. Our government reinvested the $15 million, but the NDP voted against it.

Local Newspapers
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, listening to this minister makes me believe we need to live in a big city to have a right to read a local paper.

Changes made to the program broke a help system that was working a lot better. Postal subsidy efficiently reduced costs for those papers. The money available to them now does not cover postal fees and simply is not enough.

These newspapers play a key role in the life of rural communities. Why is the government cutting help to local papers?