House of Commons Hansard #128 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was park.

Topics

Securities
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, he spoke of words. We all remember the bizarre remarks of the Prime Minister with regard to the Potash takeover.

New Democrats raised the issue first and he first dismissed the claims saying that it was an American company, for heaven's sake. Luckily, Canadians brought him to his senses on this and eventually the Prime Minister agreed with New Democrats that the Investment Canada Act actually needed to be rewritten.

Canadians do not want another decision about our economic future made behind closed doors. That is clear. Will the Prime Minister commit to Canadians that we will have an open and transparent process?

Securities
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, once again, there is a law on the books and that law will be respected.

We have a couple of parties opposite. We know the Liberal Party approved every transaction that was ever put before it. The NDP we know would oppose every transaction that was ever put before it. Our position has been clear. We will only approve those transactions that are in the best interests of this country.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' drug bill is a textbook example of Reagan's failed war on drugs. When 12 church groups and 500 health care professionals oppose the bill, the Conservatives ignore them. They refuse to admit how much it will really cost Canadian taxpayers. It just does not add up, not their failed war on drug policy and not their phoney numbers on the costs.

Will the minister finally come clean about the real costs of his failed war on drugs bill?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member and her party are unbelievable. This bill targets drug traffickers, the people who are out to exploit people and sell drugs to children. It deals with date rape drugs.

The hon. member and her colleagues stood in this House and supported this bill. If we cannot trust them on that, what can we trust them on?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives war on drugs bill is not tough on crime, it is dumb on crime. A young person with six pot plants would be treated the same way as a mob boss. An 18-year-old who abuses Tylenol 3 just once could face a minimum of two years in prison.

Estimates peg the real costs of this bill at over $200 million just for B.C.

Will the Conservatives finally reveal what the real costs are to the Canadian taxpayers because they are the ones who will pay the bill?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we did not hear from them why they supported the bill.

I am going to tell this hon. member that I would hope she would at least read the bill. That bill deals with traffickers in every single paragraph. That is completely lost on the Leader of the Opposition. It is lost on this member. The dumbest thing I have heard in this Parliament is the Liberal policy about fighting crime. That is what is dumb.

Rights & Democracy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, at a time when the issue of rights and democracy is at the heart of politics in Egypt and the Middle East, we now have the spectacle of the government admitting that Rights & Democracy in Canada has spent $1 million on gumshoes connected to the Tory party, on accountants, and on lawyers.

How does the minister justify this gross waste of public money at a time when there is a crisis in world democracy? What is the minister going to do to finally restore credibility to our own approach to rights and democracy?

Rights & Democracy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I would remind my hon. colleague that Rights & Democracy, of course, is an arm's-length organization. It is a government-funded organization, mandated to promote human rights. If the hon. member had done his homework a bit, he would realize that among the projects that are being supported by Rights & Democracy is a project in Egypt, specifically, to support democracy.

Rights & Democracy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the fact remains that we are witnessing a ridiculous spectacle; Rights & Democracy is spending $1 million of a $9 million budget on unjustified private investigations and lawyers' fees. There is no reason for this.

How do you explain the fact that the government reappointed to their positions on the organization's board of directors the two men who were responsible for the witch hunt that so greatly affected this organization?

Rights & Democracy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I would like to once again remind the hon. member that Rights & Democracy is an arm's-length organization that does work all over the world to promote democracy. In fact, I just reminded the hon. member, since he did not do his homework, that Rights & Democracy is currently involved in supporting democracy in Egypt.

Unfortunately, I have to help remind the hon. member to indulge in a little humility.

Transportation of Radioactive Waste
Oral Questions

February 10th, 2011 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, experts agree that the authorization given to Ontario company Bruce Power to transport a set quantity of nuclear waste on the St. Lawrence could create a dangerous precedent that may encourage others to try.

Does the Minister of Natural Resources realize that this authorization could be the first in a series of others that would eventually transform the St. Lawrence into a highway for the nuclear waste of Ontario and the United States? Is that really what the minister wants?

Transportation of Radioactive Waste
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the health and safety of Canadians are our top priorities, and that is why we have an independent commission that is examining this issue from a scientific perspective. After having heard from 77 stakeholders, the commission concluded that the use of the St. Lawrence to ship such waste was safe.

I asked the commission to provide a technical briefing to members of Parliament, the media, the Government of Quebec and interested communities, which it has agreed to do. Thus, I encourage all interested parties to attend this briefing.

Transportation of Radioactive Waste
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, opposition to this idea keeps growing. Over 100 municipalities, including the City of Montreal, those of the Communauté métropolitaine de Québec, the Government of Quebec and the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative, are all opposed. Now aboriginals, who were not consulted, are calling for a reversal of the decision of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

Will these people have to become evangelicals to be heard by this government?

Transportation of Radioactive Waste
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, once again, the health and safety of Canadians are the top priorities of this government. This commission came to an independent, scientific decision.

Once again, I encourage my colleague not to miss the briefing that the commission has offered to give members of Parliament, the media, the Government of Quebec and all interested municipalities. I hope that they will attend this technical briefing so that we can have an intelligent debate here in the House of Commons.

Quebec City Arena
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Quebec and the City of Quebec have announced funding for the construction of a multi-purpose arena. We know the timeline, we know where the complex will be built, we know that the cost will be $400 million, we know that the Government of Quebec will be responsible for up to 50% of the cost, and we know that the private sector will contribute to the project. There is only one unknown: what is the federal government's contribution?