House of Commons Hansard #9 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was jobs.

Topics

Government Operations and Estimates
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I wish the co-chair of the civility committee was here to witness this, but I will do my best alone.

I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates in relation to its study of the main estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2012.

I am pleased to report that the committee considered votes under National Defence referred to it and reports the same here today.

I also have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates in relation to its study of the supplementary estimates (A) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2012.

I am pleased to report that the committee considered a vote on supplementary estimates (A) under the National Defence referred to it and reports the same.

Maple Leaf and Tulip Day Act
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-214, An Act respecting the friendship between Canada and the Netherlands.

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise in the House to introduce legislation to make May 5 maple leaf and tulip day. As we all know, there is a tremendous relationship between the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Dominion of Canada. We have over 5,700 Canadians buried on Dutch soil.

I am proud to say that the ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Mr. Wim Geerts, is very close by, along with the ambassador to the Hague. They are both here to witness this historic opportunity to make May 5, in continuity, maple leaf and tulip day to show the continuing friendship between the Netherlands and Canada.

There are now one million Canadians of Dutch descent in Canada. We are slowly taking over. As we say, “If you're not Dutch, you're not much”.

So, Gouda cheese and Heineken for everyone. Let us hope we pass this bill as quickly as humanly possible.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canadian Forces Superannuation Act
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-215, An Act to amend the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act (deletion of deduction from annuity).

Mr. Speaker, we are trying for the fifth time in the House of Commons to correct a historical wrong.

In 1966, the superannuation plan of members of the armed forces, the RCMP and that of all federal and provincial public servants were blended.

What happens is that when members of the RCMP and military receive either a Canada disability pension or the Canada pension, it is deducted dollar for dollar from their superannuation plan, which leaves many of our heroes in Canada in financial dire straits when they retire or when they become disabled. This is simply wrong. Thousands upon thousands of veterans and their families, RCMP members and their families have asked that this injustice be corrected.

When we introduced this bill in the House of Commons the last time, the Conservatives, unfortunately, defeated it. We are hoping they have had a change of heart over the past election. We are hoping, for the sake of our heroes in this country, that we can correct this historical wrong.

I thank Roger Boutin, Mel Pittman and John Labelle of Lower Sackville for their great efforts, not only for their service to our country but also for the promotion of this important legislation.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Former Canadian Forces Members Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-216, An Act respecting former Canadian Forces members.

Mr. Speaker, the heroes of our country get quality medical care when they put the uniform on but when that uniform comes off they lose many opportunities to attend, for example, the Stadacona Base and other bases across the country for the medical care that is there. Thus, they must go to the civilian side and many of them can no longer even find a doctor.

People who have served this country for many years should have access to the high quality medical care that they received when they were in the service. This bill would correct that wrong and allow members of our military and their families the opportunity to access those medical services long after they take the uniform off.

We have an obligation to the heroes of our country, and not just when the uniform is on. We have an obligation to them for the rest of their natural lives. This is the contract we signed with them. They have the unlimited liability when they serve our country. As parliamentarians, we have the ultimate responsibility to see that all their needs are met, especially on this legislation.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

David Tilson Dufferin—Caledon, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-217, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (mischief relating to war memorials).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today, on behalf of the residents of my riding of Dufferin—Caledon, to introduce an act to amend the mischief provisions of the Criminal Code relating to war memorials and cenotaphs.

I introduce the bill in an effort to add significant penalties for anyone convicted of mischief against a war memorial, cenotaph or other structure intended to honour or remember those who have died as a result of war. Anyone who intentionally damages or defiles a war memorial should face severe consequences.

Respect for those who have given the ultimate sacrifice so that we may live in peace is the responsibility of every Canadian. We owe it to our men and women in uniform to protect these revered memorials.

I would ask that my colleagues support the bill in an effort to keep our war memorials and cenotaphs sacred.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canada Health Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-218, An Act to amend the Canada Health Act (Autism Spectrum Disorders).

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise in the House today to reintroduce an act to amend the Canada Health Act, the autism spectrum disorder act.

The bill would mandate both ABA and IBI, both treatments for autism, to be included in the Canada Health Act. These treatments have shown to have long-term benefits to persons diagnosed with autism, ultimately improving individuals' quality of life and productivity.

Throughout the country, our treatment system is patchwork at best and it is time the federal government end that and bring forward some really good treatment. It is time that Canada's health system supported the parents and families of persons with autism spectrum disorders and this is the first vital step, which I hope all parties will get behind and support.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

National Strategy for Autism Spectrum Disorders Act
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-219, An Act respecting the establishment of a National Strategy for Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to rise today to reintroduce a national autism strategy bill. The bill would, among other things, establish national standards for the treatment and delivery of autism-related services and create a system to monitor autism prevalence.

Roughly 1 in 200 Canadians are thought to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. I was recently told the story of an individual named Mark by my colleague from Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. Mark was born with autism. Mark fought against all odds and successfully, I am happy to say, completed two college programs and, this week, graduates from Waterloo University.

Unfortunately, people like Mark are currently the exception to the rule. I hope the swift passage of this legislation will make stories like Mark's more common in the future.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

National Brain Health Education and Awareness Month Act
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-220, An Act respecting a National Brain Health Education and Awareness Month.

Mr. Speaker, five million Canadians are living with a neurological condition today. The bill would designate the month of March as national brain awareness month in order to help raise awareness about neurological disease and injuries.

Designating the month would educate the people of Canada to enhance their understanding of brain health, including brain diseases, disorders and injuries. It would ensure that brain health research was fully funded and that preventive measures, treatment and support were universally accessible. It would confirm the government's commitment to improving the quality of life of all persons who live with a brain condition and of their families and informal caregivers.

It is my hope that hon. members will support the bill and that the introduction of the bill will help raise awareness of the need for a national brain strategy and lay the foundation for a national strategy to which our party is already committed.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

National Strategy for Sickle Cell Disease and Thalassemic Disorders Act
Routine Proceedings

June 15th, 2011 / 3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-221, An Act respecting a Comprehensive National Strategy for Sickle Cell Disease and Thalassemic Disorders.

Mr. Speaker, my bill , a national strategy for sickle cell disease and thalassemic disorders, addresses the challenges faced by children and adults living with these inherited blood disorders.

The bill calls on the Minister of Health to initiate discussions with the provincial and territorial health ministers to develop comprehensive patient care throughout the life cycle, develop national standards regarding universal screening, develop centres of excellence for both pediatric care and adult care, assess best practises for patients to succeed at school and in the work place, develop information for medical education to prepare health care workers to meet the needs of Canada's diverse populations, develop adequate clinical guidelines and prompt pain management for patients in crisis, establish a program of funding to advocacy groups, and recognize June 19 as sickle cell anemia awareness day in Canada.

I hope all hon. members will support the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Military and Veteran Families Week Act
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-222, An Act respecting a Military and Veteran Families Week.

Mr. Speaker, our World War II veterans, Korean War veterans, Canadian Forces veterans and all Canadian Forces and reserves deserve more than one week of the year of recognition because of the enormity of their sacrifices. Their loved ones also deserve recognition and support.

My private member's bill calls upon the government to designate a national week for military and veterans families, to honour the families of our military and our veterans, and to acknowledge their sacrifices and their important roles.

It is my hope that designating a national week will encourage all Canadians to have increased recognition of the contributions of military and veterans families, and celebrate their spirit with a week of appropriate activities and ceremonies that pay tribute, support and thank these families, and increase awareness of the sacrifices made by them, particularly among Veterans Affairs Canada and the government.

I hope all hon. members will support the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Employment Insurance Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-223, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (gratuities).

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to re-introduce this bill which, if passed, will improve the lives and livelihoods of thousands of Canadians with respect to the employment insurance regime.

When restaurant servers apply for EI, their tips are not taken into account in the calculation of the EI payments even though they are included when they pay taxes. So they cannot collect EI on them.

This bill would make it mandatory for servers to claim their tips as income and that EI calculations be based on that total income. This is important because the custom in the restaurant industry is for servers to have low wages on top of which they receive tips. This change would give servers the economic security and equal footing that they deserve by removing the unfair and discriminatory economic disadvantage they face if they lose their jobs.

I would again like to extend my congratulations and thanks to Caitlin Rooney, a constituent of mine from the riding of Halifax who brought this issue to my attention. I would like to thank the member for Berthier—Maskinongé for seconding this bill, as I know she is a passionate advocate for the rights of workers who rely on tips to make ends meet.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Climate Change Accountability Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-224, An Act to ensure Canada assumes its responsibilities in preventing dangerous climate change.

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to be re-tabling, for the third time, the NDP's climate change accountability act.

As everybody knows, the bill would establish a strong plan with firm science-based targets that would address the dangerous climate change resulting from unchecked greenhouse emissions and help improve our tarnished international reputation.

The government's lack of real action on climate change and refusal to take a significant leadership role internationally means that a massive environmental debt will be left for future generations, not just in Canada but globally.

The bill is important because it would provide a touchstone and a rallying point for Canadians concerned about the need for real science-based targets. It would help inform policy-makers about what needs to be done in taking a significant role in addressing climate change.

My New Democrat colleagues and I are committed to advocating for the targets and policies found in the bill and we will work with civil society organizations, activists, policy experts and Canadians to convince the government the time to act is now.

I would also like to thank the member for Rivière-des-Mille-Îles and the NDP deputy environment critic for seconding the bill and for her willingness to take part in the fight against catastrophic climate change for her constituents and for all Canadians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Fisheries Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

NDP

Fin Donnelly New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-225, An Act to amend the Fisheries Act (closed containment aquaculture).

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to re-introduce a bill which aims to strengthen the Fisheries Act by requiring British Columbia fish farms to move from harmful open net pens to safe closed containment systems.

My bill would direct the fisheries and oceans minister to develop, table and implement a transition plan to move to closed containment. The plan would also ensure that those currently working in the industry would be protected during this transition.

The people of British Columbia have been clear on this issue. They want to protect wild salmon for generations to come. Thousands of people have signed petitions or postcards urging the federal government to adopt this legislation.

The economic opportunities are real. We have the potential to be leaders in closed containment technology. Amending the Fisheries act and moving to closed containment is a step in the right direction.

I hope all members of the House will join me in supporting the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

NDP

Fin Donnelly New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-226, An Act to change the name of the electoral district of New Westminster—Coquitlam.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to re-introduce an act to change the name of the electoral district New Westminster—Coquitlam. The bill would amend the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act by adding Port Moody to the riding name.

Port Moody is an important part of my riding. Nestled at the east end of Burrard Inlet and surrounded by stunning scenery, Port Moody is a city that has a rich history and is the original terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

When I stand in the House, I want everyone to know who I am representing, and that includes the good people of Port Moody.

I ask my colleagues to pass the bill, as it would mean so much to all those in my riding.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

National Strategy for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Act
Routine Proceedings

3:30 p.m.

NDP

John Rafferty Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-227, An Act respecting the establishment of a National Strategy for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

Mr. Speaker, my bill asks the Government of Canada to establish a national strategy for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder that includes: the establishment, in co-operation with the provincial governments, of national standards for the treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and the delivery of related services; and the study, in co-operation with the provincial governments, of the funding arrangements for the care of those with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, including the possibility of transferring federal funds to assist the provincial governments in providing treatment, education, professional training and other required supports for Canadians with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)