House of Commons Hansard #9 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was jobs.

Topics

Jordan Fram and Jason Chenier
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to two miners who lost their lives last week in an accident at the Stobie Mine in Sudbury. Jordan Fram, age 26, was a 6-year veteran of the mines and 35-year-old Jason Chenier had 11 years of experience when they perished on June 8 while working 3,000 feet underground.

This devastating loss has saddened the entire community and resulted in nine stop-work orders issued against Vale by the Ontario Ministry of Labour, due in part to worrisome levels of water in the mine. This tragedy is a stark reminder that mining remains a dangerous profession and that we must learn from this tragedy to ensure it does not happen again. These men's lives were cut short, leaving behind grieving families, colleagues and communities in a desperate search for answers.

On behalf of all members of the House, I extend my heartfelt sympathies to their loved ones and colleagues. May they rest in peace.

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements By Members

June 15th, 2011 / 2:20 p.m.

Conservative

David Wilks Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, the NDP of the radical hard left do not know the first thing about governing. Ask a British Columbian or Ontarian who had to put up with its members in power.

While Canadians remain concerned about jobs and the economy, the NDP is having a gut-wrenching debate about whether or not it should remain committed to its reckless, hard left, high tax, socialist principles.

The NDP radical left remains committed to pro-drug policies and anti-trade policies. The NDP opposes Canada's leadership as a clean energy superpower. It even questions its commitment to federalism, with calls to repeal the Clarity Act.

The NDP proposed child care from birth to age 12, a 45-day work year and a 50% hike in the pension plan, policies that would cost billions.

The radical hard left NDPers should stop and think about the real priorities of Canadians: jobs and the economy.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Toronto—Danforth
Ontario

NDP

Jack Layton Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the economy and job creation depend on four key factors: consumption, exports, investment and the government. Canadian household debt is far too high. Canadians are at a breaking point. Exports are declining. Corporations are no longer reinvesting because the tax cuts they are getting from the Conservatives are nothing but bonuses for senior management. The ball is in the government's court.

When will there be a real strategy for growth and job creation for our workers and our Canadians?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, Canada has the best job creation record in the industrialized world. We are currently seeing a private sector-led recovery. Obviously, the budget passed by this Parliament will help us continue this recovery.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Toronto—Danforth
Ontario

NDP

Jack Layton Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the facts run counter to what the Prime Minister is saying.

Since the Conservatives came to power, the fact is we have lost hundreds of thousands of good paying manufacturing jobs. The latest data from Statistics Canada today confirms that the bleeding continues. Manufacturing, in particular, and the auto and aerospace industries are losing thousands of jobs.

When are we going to realize that the policies are creating low wage part-time jobs and killing the balanced economy that we have been building in our country since the Second World War?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian economy has created over 550,000 jobs since the recession. Those jobs have been focused in the private sector and on high paying jobs. Those are the facts. Obviously we would like to see more and that is why we passed the budget.

The leader of the NDP said earlier that we could not create jobs through consumption, or investment or through exports, that we had to do it through government. On this side, we are aiming to have a private sector-led recovery.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Toronto—Danforth
Ontario

NDP

Jack Layton Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the government does not have a plan to create jobs then. That is quite clear. Its only strategy is to prevent working people from the right to bargain. Labour disputes should be dealt with fairly at the bargaining table.

First, the government threatens back to work legislation mere hours after Air Canada workers used their legitimate right to strike. Then it turns around, takes a government corporation and locks out its own workers, preventing Canadians from getting their mail.

Does the Prime Minister consider that this could in any way be interpreted as fair bargaining practice?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the two parties in both the Air Canada dispute and the Canada Post dispute have thus far been unable to reach a settlement. Due to their inability to reach a settlement, they are threatening greater damage on other parties in the Canadian economy. That is not acceptable to the government.

This government will act to ensure that the Canadian economy and the wider interests of the Canadian public are protected.

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, Canada Post suddenly locked out all postal workers late last night. Is this bargaining in good faith?

The lockout is unnecessary. The union offered to suspend its strikes and work under the old contract during negotiations.

What is the minister doing to ensure Canada Post negotiates fairly? Is she fine with Canada Post manufacturing a crisis so the government can step in with back-to-work legislation?

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister has just indicated, in this case, Canada Post and the union have been unable to reach a negotiated settlement, which is a great disappointment for us because of the effect it has on Canadians and on the Canadian economy.

As a result, tonight we will be putting on notice legislation to restore mail delivery service for Canadians.

Air Canada
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, with respect to Air Canada, the Minister of Labour keeps saying that special legislation is necessary because the Air Canada strike could hinder our economic recovery. She seems to forget that the workers affected by this dispute are also consumers who keep the economy rolling.

Does the Minister of Labour realize that vulnerable workers and people who lose their pensions are not going to help our country's economic recovery?

Air Canada
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, we have two parties at the table who have been trying to negotiate a collective agreement for a very long period of time. They are unable to reach said agreement by themselves, even though they have had ample opportunity to do so, and much support from this government and Labour Canada in terms of reaching an agreement.

Therefore, on behalf of Canadians in general and because we have a strong mandate on this economy to make sure it recovers, we have acted.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have just learned that the Minister of Finance has just given a speech in New York City where, in the middle of a major political debate in the United States, the minister has chosen to side with the Republican fiscal hawks in the United States Congress.

I would like to ask the Prime Minister, since when does the Government of Canada interfere in the domestic political issues in the United States, and since when does his government become a branch plant of the Republican tea party in the United States?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I do not know what the leader of the Liberal Party is talking about, but I can tell him this. Throughout the global recession and recovery, the leaders of the G20 have been working together to address the global economic situation.

What we do in each of our own countries in this global economy affects us all, and obviously we are working together to ensure a strong global recovery.

Auditor General's Report
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Speaking of double standards, Mr. Speaker, we now have another one.

The Prime Minister is constantly saying that those of us who quote the Auditor General are not telling the truth. So let me simply quote the Auditor General very directly with respect to the activities of the President of the Treasury Board and ask him one simple question.

The interim Auditor General said that he found what the government did unusual and troubling. I would like to ask the Prime Minister, is the Auditor General telling the truth when he says those words?