House of Commons Hansard #21 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-10.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the minister, despite being asked multiple times, has still not said what he considers to be a core program, so perhaps the Minister of Health would like to answer a question because these programs are not only an environmental concern and surely the Minister of Health knows that the UV index created by Canada has lowered skin cancer rates and saved lives.

For the Minister of Health, will she have the courage to stand up for the health of Canadians?

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague knows, our government does recognize the burden of cancer and the effect that it has on lives and the families who live with loved ones who have this horrible disease. That is why our government is supporting cancer control and prevention efforts, working with provincial and territorial governments as well as stakeholders from across Canada to reduce the burden of cancer. We are renewing $250 million over five years for the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer to continue its excellent work.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, this out-of-touch government seems more concerned with American unemployment than Canadian jobs. Why else would it ignore environmental concerns on both sides of the border and ship raw bitumen on the Keystone pipeline to the Gulf coast?

We all know it is not just oil sands bitumen that will flow through that pipeline. It is good paying Canadian jobs.

Will this out-of-touch government come clean about what the Keystone pipeline really means to Canadian families: a loss of good paying Canadian jobs?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the NDP talking about jobs and the oil sands is frankly ridiculous. The NDP's former environment critic called for a moratorium on oil sands development. The Keystone XL pipeline will create over 140,000 jobs and $600 billion in economic activity. That is what the NDP is prepared to kill.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government is not doing anything to protect Canadians' jobs in the Keystone XL project. Thousands of well-paying, quality jobs will be transferred to the United States should the project go ahead. According to a study conducted by Informetrica, tens of thousands of Canadian jobs are at stake.

Why is this government sacrificing thousands of Canadian jobs for the sake of its relationship with the oil companies?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that oil sands development generates over 500,000 jobs and the Keystone project will generate over 140,000 jobs across Canada.

It is also interesting to note how the NDP does not really understand that there is no refinery capacity in Alberta. There is in Texas. It would cost over $16 billion to create refineries, rendering it uneconomical.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

September 27th, 2011 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to defending Canadians against U.S. protectionism, the government has failed consistently.

DFAIT officials before a committee admitted that the government had failed to take pre-emptive action against buy American, even though President Obama has been stating made in America for months.

The WTO found United States country of origin labelling is a trade violation and yet the government makes excuses.

When will the Minister of International Trade realize that United States protectionism is something he must defend against, not make excuses for?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, it was actually the Liberal Party that slept through 13 long years on the trade file.

It was the WTO that recently pointed out that Canada's considerably expanded free trade agreement agenda marks a departure with its past practice. What practice are we referring to? It is the practice of the previous Liberal government.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government falls short every time it is faced with American protectionism. When the United States announced its Buy American initiative in 2009, it took the Conservatives seven months to react. According to the WTO, country-of-origin labelling violates trade laws. Nevertheless, the government continues to insist that the United States is negotiating in good faith.

When will the Conservatives realize that they have to fight American protectionism, not excuse it?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, we have stated time and again that trade is critical to Canada's long-term prosperity. We have been working very hard to impress upon our American neighbours that protectionism hurts not only Canadians, but it hurts Americans. It takes away jobs and it takes away the robustness of global trade.

We will continue to stand up for hard-working Canadians and businesses. Why will the Liberal Party not do so?

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, this government's research and development policy is pathetic, and a recent report has confirmed that. Canada ranks last among industrialized countries in terms of direct funding for research. It ranks second-last in terms of patent development and second-last in terms of the number of PhD graduates. What a failure.

Will this government review its research and development policies to create the jobs that our economy and Canadian families so desperately need?

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, I reject the premise of that question. In fact, no government in the history of our country has put so much investment into science and technology. In fact, the brain drain that we knew about years and years ago under the Liberals has been reversed under this government.

We now have more fellowships, more internships, more Canada excellence research chairs and more Canada research chairs. We have funding for buildings and equipment.

That is under this Prime Minister, and that is a fantastic record.

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, it would be great if it were true but it simply is not.

On this side of the House, we believe in innovation, but let us see the record on the other side. We see that direct public investment in R & D is in last place in the industrialized world. Patent development is second to last. PhD graduates are second to last. That is the record of the government. It is clear that the government does not have a plan.

When will the government stop endangering our economy and start investing in research and development to create jobs here in Canada for Canadian families?

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, first, productivity and innovation have been declining for decades, which is exactly why the Prime Minister came forward with the science and tech strategy in 2007. Under that strategy, we have invested historic amounts of funding for our universities and incentives for our businesses.

It is true that businesses are not doing enough, which is exactly why, if the member were paying attention, we launched a panel review into the R and D sectors and our platform of programs. That panel will report in a couple of weeks. The hon. member should stay tuned.

Political Donations
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Bryan Hayes Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, today, the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics passed an important motion to investigate the questionable influence of big unions on the NDP.

Last week, it was revealed that the NDP received at least $85,000 from big labour unions for their convention even though such donations were banned in 2005.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister please update the House on Elections Canada law and what we are doing to ensure Canadians know about the big union donations that are subsidizing the NDP?