House of Commons Hansard #69 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, why is it that the Liberals voted against pension income splitting for seniors? Why is it that they voted against increasing the age credit limit not once but twice? Why is it--

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh! Oh!

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. minister has the floor and members will give her their attention. The hon. Minister of Human Resources.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, why is it that the Liberals voted against the largest increase in the guaranteed income supplement? That is the funding that goes to the poorest of our seniors. Why did they vote against that too?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, today we learned that Australia is thinking about delaying its purchase of the F-35 fighter jets. The reasons for this are clear: the jet will not be ready in time, the costs of the project are skyrocketing and technical difficulties are mounting.

I can say from experience that soldiers always have a plan B, in case things do not go as planned. But this government does not even respect the basic principles taught to our soldiers.

Why does the minister still not have a plan B?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, our Royal Canadian Air Force has flown CF-18s for 30 years. We are working with our allies to replace our aging aircraft with new state of the art F-35s, which will protect international stability for decades to come.

Australia faces an immediate challenge in replacing older aircraft much sooner, as we have been doing.

We will continue to closely monitor the international development of the F-35 and its capabilities for the Canadian Forces.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, any minister who says that everything is fine with the F-35 project is denying the facts and mismanaging the file. The United States, the United Kingdom and Australia are all reviewing their programs. If I were in the minister's position, any one problem with the F-35s would have prompted me to come up with a plan B just in case. Yet, despite all the problems, this minister still does not have a plan B.

When will the minister come back to earth and tell us his plan B?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I do not know where all this rhetoric is coming from other than desperation.

Our government is committed to getting the best equipment for our Canadian Forces at the best price for Canadians with the best benefits for Canadian companies and Canadian workers. Canada's participation in the development of the F-35, along with our closest allies, ensures that the Canadian Forces will have the best equipment to achieve mission success.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Kellway Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, in spite of cost overruns and mounting technical problems, we left off in 2011 with the minister sticking to the same old story on the F-35.

Since then the U.S. has come to grips with reality. It has cancelled 179 planes and has delayed production of the rest. The Australians, having already downsized their order once, are thinking of doing it again.

With everyone else pulling the chute on this plane, will the minister tell us how much more the F-35s will now cost Canadians?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we are monitoring the events very closely with all of our nation partners as well. Just as a sideline, that very member back in December talked about some report he read where there was supposed to be no training for F-35 Canadian pilots here. That “no” referred to Norway. The member does not even know what he is talking about.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Kellway Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, after six weeks away and in light of such significant changes, Canadians were expecting the minister to have something more to say on this issue. Around the world, countries are taking a realistic look at the F-35 and cutting back on their orders even in the U.S. Now I value hope and optimism, but here we have crossed over to a world of fantasy.

Are the F-35s the government ordered somehow special? Are they different from those being rejected by other countries? How are our jets on track, while the rest of the world's are falling off the rails?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the member is absolutely wrong. The truth of the matter is that we welcome the announcement by the United States, which confirms its commitment to the multinational Joint Strike Fighter. Canada remains committed to the development of the new state-of-the-art aircraft that our brave men and women agree will give them the best probability of mission success well into the 21st century.

We continue to monitor the progress of the multinational Joint Strike Fighter program closely and exercise responsible stewardship of taxpayer money.

Justice
Oral Questions

January 30th, 2012 / 2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Roxanne James Scarborough Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are concerned about crime and the reaction I have heard from my constituents regarding yesterday's verdict in the so-called honour killings of four women in Kingston confirms this very fact. We now know that the Shafia sisters, along with Rona Amir Mohammed, were killed because they were women, women who wanted nothing more than to live their lives according to Canadian values, free from oppression and free from violence.

As Justice Maranger said yesterday, “it is difficult to conceive of a more heinous, more despicable, more honourless crime than killing your own children for no other reason than some perverted sense of honour”.

Could the Minister of Justice please provide the House with our government's view of the so-called—

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of Justice.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we have been very clear. So-called honour killings are barbaric, unacceptable and have no place in Canada. We are committed to protecting women and other vulnerable persons from all forms of violence and to hold offenders accountable for their acts.

In Canada murder is murder regardless of the motive. Our government has always focused primarily on the rights of victims and not on the twisted rationale offered by convicted murderers. We send the message loudly and clearly that if people commit such terrible acts of violence in Canada, they will face Canadian justice.