House of Commons Hansard #78 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was balance.

Topics

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is because the provinces are concerned that we rise in this House. Moreover, we stand up for all Canadians.

There are other concerns. For years, the Conservatives, with the complicity of the Bloc, have been supporting the asbestos industry, an industry that kills thousands every year, an industry that produces materials that we have banned here at home.

The Conservatives see no problem in selling so-called safe, carcinogenic chrysotile asbestos to the highest bidder. They even refuse to add it to the Rotterdam Convention list of hazardous materials.

Will the Conservatives finally put human lives ahead of the electoral interests of the ministers who are exporting death?

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, for more than 30 years, the Government of Canada has been supporting the safe use of chrysotile. Recent scientific studies have shown that chrysotile can be used safely in a controlled environment.

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, it still raises the question: why are they ignoring the mountains of scientific evidence that shows that asbestos causes cancer?

The government is still trying to find new markets in the developing world to export this deadly substance. It is even opposed to warning other countries about the danger. It has blocked the inclusion of chrysotile asbestos on the list of dangerous products under the Rotterdam convention.

I ask again, why is the government ignoring the evidence and turning a blind eye to asbestos victims?

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, for more than 30 years, the Government of Canada has been supporting the safe use of chrysotile. Recent scientific studies have shown that chrysotile can be used safely in a controlled environment.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government has an ambitious pro-trade plan.

Led by the hard-working Minister of International Trade, it is getting results. As an example, in China he recently concluded a job-creating investment agreement. With one in five Canadian jobs generated by trade, we know that when we pursue trade opportunities in high-growth markets, it is a surefire way to create economic growth and jobs for Canadian workers and their families in every region of our country.

Can the parliamentary secretary please explain how our pro-trade plan is getting results?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is absolutely right. Our government's ambitious pro-trade plan is getting results.

Canada's 2011 trade balance is in a surplus, fuelled by an almost 27% increase in exports to China. As the hon. member said, with one in five Canadian jobs generated by trade, this is great news.

We are focused on growing Canada's economy and creating jobs with our pro-trade plan. The NDP continues to promote its anti-trade agenda that will kill jobs. The NDP's reckless and irresponsible anti-trade agenda is a danger to the Canadian economy and to Canadian jobs.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Matthew Kellway Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, we do not support the government's trade plan because it reminds us of the F-35. Its shortcomings emerge daily and it just does not get the job done for Canadians.

Yesterday the response from the minister revealed that the F-35 has become an article of faith for the government. That finally explains its refusal to listen to experts, to independent studies and even to our allies. All the evidence points to a deeply flawed developmental program plagued with technical setbacks and enormous cost risks.

Why will the minister not put a little faith in an open and transparent procurement process to replace the F-18s?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Ajax—Pickering
Ontario

Conservative

Chris Alexander Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as the member well knows, we have answered all of these questions and more.

The F-35 is flying. Nine countries including Canada remain committed to it. Some have committed to purchasing very large numbers of these aircraft. The project is creating jobs across Canada, through over $300 million of contracts for over 60 companies in 6 provinces.

This government will ensure that the Royal Canadian Air Force has the right aircraft to protect our sovereignty at home and to promote our interests around the world.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Matthew Kellway Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, those old speaking notes are contradicted almost daily by breaking news and evidence.

Today's news on the F-35 is that the Italians have cut back their purchase of the F-35s. Italy realized that it will not be able to afford these planes. It, like so many of our allies, realizes that when the price tag on these planes is at last known, it will inevitably be wholly indecent.

Why will the Conservatives not have a competition so that we can get the best plane for the best price?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Ajax—Pickering
Ontario

Conservative

Chris Alexander Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the only member I have seen in this House today speaking from notes is the member opposite. We have heard them before. The NDP really should get its facts straight.

The largest country committed to this project is the United States. It has recently confirmed it will take delivery, over many years, of 2,443 of these aircraft. Canada is with them, with eight other of our allies and partners.

This is the right aircraft to do the job. We remain committed.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, after reports of a serious security breach in the defence department, Jeffrey Delisle was arrested.

As a result, Conservative sources told the media that four Russian diplomats were being expelled from Canada. But the Russian ambassador is now telling the media that no one was expelled, and there is an agreement to keep this quiet.

With our international credibility on the line, will the government confirm that Russian diplomats were not in fact expelled?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as this matter relates to national security, I have no further comment.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, it was the Conservatives who fed this story to the media and claimed that Russian diplomats were being expelled.

This is the biggest intelligence breach in recent Canadian history. The Russian ambassador is saying that he will make Canada look “very red-faced”.

Would the government confirm whether these Russians were expelled, or was this story about the expulsions just a smokescreen to distract attention from this massive security failure?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, this matter relates to national security so I have no further comment.

Goverment Appointments
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, morale within the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and the Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation is not good. A minimum of 44 pink slips are about to be handed out, with more on the way.

Professionals, hired on merit and who contributed so much to the agencies' performance, are being shown the door, all while failed Conservative hacks, like Cecil Clarke, walk into guaranteed jobs worth $135,000 a year.

Would the government acknowledge that morale at ACOA and ECBC is being hurt by the patronage scandal that it created?