House of Commons Hansard #80 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was banks.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The right hon. Prime Minister.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the changes in the lawful access legislation have not only been sought by police to protect our young people from pedophiles, but they have in fact been supported by every single provincial government and every single attorney general, including those who are Liberal. It might be relevant to the hon. member, that includes those who are NDP as well, depending on which side he is on these days.

It is important that among the provinces there really is an all-party consensus on this. I hope Parliament will study this bill carefully and make sure we do what is best for our children and our law enforcement agencies.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives think it is okay to spy on ordinary Canadians and treat law-abiding citizens like criminals and that it is okay for the police to track one's cellphone or follow one on the Internet however they want, whenever they want. The government is going to force companies to build elaborate spyware so that it can track the activities of any ordinary citizen. This would be like putting an electronic prisoner's bracelet on everyone with a cellphone.

Why is the government turning against ordinary citizens? Why is it attacking the rights of privacy of ordinary, law-abiding Canadian citizens?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I can clearly state that everything the member said is false. There is nothing in the bill that would allow police to snoop on an individual's private conversations or even to follow a person's activities on the Internet. All that has to be done through a judicially authorized warrant.

If the member had stayed for the technical briefing that was provided for him, he would have heard that.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wrote the minister a letter asking why he was breaking the promise of Stockwell Day. Stockwell Day promised Canadians that the government would protect privacy rights and judicial oversights. The minister wrote me back and said that times have changed. Yes, times have changed. Stockwell Day is gone and the Conservatives have a majority.

The basis of a free and democratic society is the right to due process and the right to privacy. The government has declared open season on average Canadians. The minister needs to come clean with Canadians on why he wants to snoop and spy on them.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, all I am asking the member to do is actually read the bill and then be honest with Canadians. That is something he is actually incapable of doing. He is either incapable of reading or incapable of being honest.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, we feel the love coming from the other side of the House, that is for sure.

A minister of public insecurity has introduced a Conservative bill on lawful access that treats law-abiding citizens like criminals. I think I have heard that somewhere before. I agree we need to protect those who are more vulnerable, but we could do so without giving the government the power to spy on all Canadians.

Why are the Conservatives so eager to protect the personal information of hunters, while giving themselves the power to infringe upon the personal freedoms of all Canadians?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, if the member is not feeling loved over there, tell her that she can come over here. She will be loved here. We will explain the legislation that we are bringing forward.

As I have made clear, we are ensuring that there is judicial oversight and there is accountability by the police when they obtain information. For any private information there is a warrant system.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is so sad because I had the same offer for him from our side, although I have doubts about that.

Once again, the government will not listen to anyone who contradicts it. Quebec's information and privacy commissioner clearly said that this bill goes too far. The rights and freedoms of Canadians will once again be flouted by this government.

Why is this government being so stubborn and refusing to listen to the experts? What about transparency? Is the government waiting for a court challenge?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, every provincial attorney general, including two NDP attorneys general, supports this legislation as being necessary in order to stop the proliferation of child pornography on the Internet. It does not intrude on an individual's privacy without judicial authorization.

As for love in that caucus, I understand the member just left that caucus for the third party.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

February 14th, 2012 / 2:30 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the Conservatives could find love for aboriginal children.

At today's Have a Heart for First Nations Children Valentine Rally on Parliament Hill, children called for a better world for first nations children. They recognize that the needs of first nations children are the same as all children.

The Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development has dubbed the national panel's plan of action to address the long-standing inequities in education merely “aspirational”.

Will the government listen to the children, commit the needed resources and put students first?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, our government will keep building on our progress to improve first nations education.

We are engaged with first nations. Our government has signed five education partnership agreements with provinces and first nations. I was proud to sign the first nations education framework agreement three weeks ago with B.C. first nations and the province.

We will review the national panel's recommendations and continue working for first nations students.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jonathan Genest-Jourdain Manicouagan, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is not enough. First nations children need real action, not empty promises. First nations leaders have been clear: the only acceptable action plan is one that addresses all educational needs, from early childhood to post-secondary education. What is missing is partnership with the federal government.

So will this government commit to working in partnership with first nations, beginning immediately, to address the educational needs of youth with an education system that is properly funded and respects first nations' language and culture?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we have been working in partnership. That is why we launched the joint action plan with the national chief. That is why that joint action plan prioritized K-12 education.

Our government continues to build on our progress to improve first nations education. Since we have been in office, we have built 22 new schools. We tendered the new school in Attawapiskat last month.

We will review the national panel's recommendations and report in due course.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives keep making bad decisions and Canadians are paying the price. Workers are not receiving their employment insurance cheques on time and seniors are worried about cuts to the old age security program, but this government is determined to waste $30 billion on jets that do not meet our needs. Lockheed Martin has confirmed that the price of the F-35s is going to go up some more. That is what the NDP has been saying for months.

Why penalize Canadians with such bad decisions? Why not put families first, seniors first, people first?