House of Commons Hansard #85 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-30.

Topics

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are alarmed that the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism wants the sole power to say what countries are safe for refugees. Now we see that the minister wants the power to strip tens of thousands of permanent residents of their very status if he thinks conditions have improved in the countries they escaped. These people fled persecution and hardship and were given a promise from the Canadian government that they would be protected.

Is it the minister's intention to call into question the permanent residency status of tens of thousands of refugees living in Canada and, If so, why?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

No it is not, Mr. Speaker. As is often the case, the member is completely wrong. In fact, there is nothing in Bill C-31 that would give a minister power to revoke permanent residency from anyone. There is already in the Immigration Refugee Protection Act a power for the Immigration and Refugee Board. That would be an independent, quasi-judicial body that can revoke protected status and/or permanent residency from people who obtained it fraudulently.

Yes, we do believe that people who fraudulently obtain asylum or permanent residency should have that reviewed. If they obtained it fraudulently, it can and should be revoked by the IRB, not by the minister.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Sadia Groguhé Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, we want to fight fraud, but this bill will only concentrate power in the minister's hands. The proposed changes do not make sense. The government is not keeping its promise with respect to a process that everyone had agreed to and that assured asylum seekers that their applications would be dealt with quickly and fairly.

Furthermore, the government is creating a climate of great uncertainty for permanent residents, who will live in fear of a sudden change in their status. Permanent resident status should not be dependent upon the whim of the minister.

Will the minister revise this flawed bill?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Mr. Speaker, the two NDP immigration critics have had a number of months to familiarize themselves with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. I will again give them a basic briefing so that they will understand, for example, that since 2002 the Immigration and Refugee Board has been authorized under the act to revoke permanent resident status or protected person status from people who obtained it fraudulently. We believe that it is appropriate that the law give the IRB, an independent body, the power to revoke any status that has been obtained fraudulently.

International Trade
Oral Questions

February 28th, 2012 / 2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Ron Cannan Kelowna—Lake Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, our government understands the importance of international trade to Canada's economy. Thanks to our government's leadership, Canadian businesses and workers now have preferred access and a real competitive edge in more markets around the world than in any other time in history.

Among the many initiatives our government is undertaking in high growth dynamic markets around the world is a Canada-European Union trade agreement, which is a key component of our ambitious pro-trade plan for jobs and growth.

Could the minister update the House about the results of his discussions today with his provincial and territorial counterparts?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to report that today the federal, provincial and territorial governments issued an historic and unprecedented statement in support of a Canada-E.U. free trade agreement. We agreed that it was trade being equivalent to over 60% of our economy. There is no more important negotiating priority today than a free trade agreement with the E.U. As we said today in our joint statement, we all remain committed to an ambitious outcome to these negotiations.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Job Bank operated by HRSDC has been shut down for two weeks. That is two weeks and still no resolution. Unemployed Canadians are trying to get back on their feet, but they are not getting the help that they need to get a job. The government is not serious about getting people back to work. There is no job creation strategy and now, no Job Bank.

Why will the government not get serious and help unemployed Canadians get back to work?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, in fact, our government's top priority is job creation and economic growth. Part of this is ensuring that Canadians do have the help they need to get the jobs. Unfortunately, there was a security issue with the Job Bank. It was identified and all the appropriate parties were notified, including the Privacy Commissioner.

I can assure members that HRSDC officials are working around the clock so we can get the Job Bank back up and running in a secure way as quickly as possible.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, people are looking for jobs; it is as simple as that. From employment insurance claims processing to the Job Bank, automation has been nothing but problematic. Unemployed workers need more. They need to get their employment insurance cheques quickly. They need to find new jobs using tools like the Job Bank. They need someone to answer the phone.

Canadians pay for these services. Where are the services they have paid for and are entitled to?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the Job Bank is being overhauled to enhance security and better meet the needs of unemployed Canadians. Officials in my department have assured me that they are working very hard to make the Job Bank more secure and more useful. We want to help people find work. That is why we are working so hard.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, we found out today that the government will be shutting down the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory, PEARL, on Ellesmere Island. After significant investment into this world-renowned atmospheric research station in the high Arctic, the Conservatives are slashing funding. Instead, they plan to open another one five years from now and in the wrong location. This is another example of the Conservatives' approach to science.

Why does the government make decisions based on the whims of a Prime Minister, instead of listening to great Canadian scientists and their globally important research? When will the Conservatives get their heads out of the sand when it comes to the global climate crisis?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, Environment Canada recognizes the importance of university atmospheric research in the Arctic and has provided partial funding, along with a number of other bodies, since 2009 for the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory.

However, the university research application to those other bodies for renewed funding, with support from Environment Canada, was not successful at the recent national centres of excellence competition. That said, Environment Canada will continue to monitor ozone and the atmosphere at Eureka.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène LeBlanc LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the government announced that it was going to review all the programs that support the aerospace industry. Canadians are no fools. They know that “review” often means “cut” to the Conservatives. The aerospace industry supports 80,000 jobs, 40,000 of which are in Quebec, including in the Montreal area. The industry accounts for 70% of the research and development done in Canada.

Will the government commit to funding the research and development that supports thousands of jobs in the aerospace industry?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, I had the opportunity to announce that there would be a review committee made up of David Emerson, Sandra Pupatello, Jacques Roy and Jim Quick, who are all qualified experts. In our 2011 budget, we committed to reviewing every policy in order to optimize the spinoffs from this industry, which generates $22 billion in revenue a year and 80,000 high-quality jobs.

If the hon. member were really concerned about the industry, she would support our F-35 program, which will produce even more benefits, including near her riding.

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to return to the fact that the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister was briefed by his leader. Perhaps he can set the record straight. My question is for his boss, the Prime Minister.

We just learned that there is a direct link between RackNine and the Conservative Party of Canada, whether it be its head office in Ottawa or its office in Guelph.

Can someone please explain to us why this electoral fraud took place? Could he set the record straight and tell us why the Conservative Party did such a thing?