House of Commons Hansard #73 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was financial.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Madam Speaker, the member for Burnaby—New Westminster cites a report by a left wing think tank that has been widely discredited. The number is false. Our entire tough on crime agenda is estimated to cost $2.7 billion over five years. In fact, our costs are based on estimates of a prison population that has failed to materialize. That will mean even more savings.

The NDP's willingness to distort the facts and attempt to mislead Canadians shows how reckless the NDP is and the danger it presents to Canada's interests and Canada's victims of crime.

Pensions
Oral Questions

February 3rd, 2012 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Alain Giguère Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Madam Speaker, the Conservatives' attack on old age security shows just how out of touch with reality the government is. After six years of mismanagement, they now want to penalize Canadians who have worked and saved their whole lives. Yesterday, the NDP moved a motion to protect old age security so that all Canadians can retire in dignity.

Will the government clarify its intentions here in the House, not in Davos? Or will the government force people to wait until they turn 67 before they can collect their retirement benefits?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Madam Speaker, the NDP is the party on the attack, and they are attacking Canadians. They say that there will be cuts, which is not true. We will not stand for that.

What we are trying to do—what we will do—is protect the old age security program for the current generation, of course, as well as for future generations. The program must be made viable; currently it is not. We will protect the old age security program.

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Dan Harris Scarborough Southwest, ON

Madam Speaker, the Public Appointments Commission was supposed to be part of the Federal Accountability Act. The secretariat was created 2,114 days ago, and since then millions has been spent, but the commission never materialized.

Under the Conservatives, patronage has gone from bad to worse. Candidates with Conservative connections land plum federal appointments. Just when integrity is needed, Conservatives choose more patronage and waste millions on phantom commissions.

When will the Conservative hypocrisy stop?

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and for Western Economic Diversification

Madam Speaker, the member opposite should know that we tried to appoint an appointments commissioner, and it was that party in the opposition that shot it down.

All appointments are done based on merit.

Transport
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Isabelle Morin Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Madam Speaker, many residents of Longueuil, and Montreal in general, take public transit across the Champlain Bridge. Yet this government still refuses to confirm its plans for that sector.

Will there be designated bus lanes? Will there be light rail? Too many questions remain unanswered. On this side of the House, we know that the future hinges on improving public transit. When will the Conservatives commit to providing the people with the services they need on the Champlain Bridge? When?

Transport
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Madam Speaker, the minister has already announced plans to replace the Champlain Bridge. So we are making progress. We are examining the impact on the local environment.

As for the broader question of public transit, our government had made investments and achieved results. For instance, the average age of infrastructure in Canada is coming down for the first time in 30 years. This proves that we are investing in our infrastructure and in public transit.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat Pontiac, QC

Madam Speaker, the situation in aboriginal communities under third party management by this government is not improving. Take for example the Barriere Lake reserve, which has been under third party management for far too long. The record is shameful: no new housing since the 1980s, no secondary school on the reserve and no investment in the primary school.

When will the government end third party management, which is not working, and when will this government allow the Algonquins of Barriere Lake to take care of themselves?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Madam Speaker, the situation at Barriere Lake, Lac-Barrière, is a very difficult one. I agree. It has been going on for years. We have invoked a rarely used section of the act in order to try to effect governance in that community. We will continue to do what we can in a very difficult set of circumstances and do the right thing for the people of that community.

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Andrews Avalon, NL

Madam Speaker, the employees at the marine communications and traffic services centre know their jobs and the government should listen to them. However, our regional minister recently insulted them as he rubbed cake in their faces and then ran out the back door.

The Coast Guard continues to be gutted. First it was about closing the marine sub-centre. Now we find out that the government has given the order to cut key positions in marine communications and traffic services. The employees have confirmed these cuts and are very concerned that they will drastically affect their ability to keep mariners safe.

Let us be clear: these employees listen for the mayday calls. Why would the government compromise this important service?

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Madam Speaker, as usual the member opposite is entirely wrong. The efficiencies being gained at the sub-centre are strictly a working of the overtime situation, allowing better usage of overtime, with principles that have been used in both Victoria and Quebec for some 10 years now. We are simply nationalizing that as a policy to save money and still protect mariners.

Sealing Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Madam Speaker, yesterday there was this event about seals as part of Seal Day. The member for Labrador said yesterday that he was disappointed that no opposition MPs were there at the event. However, yesterday morning my office called to find out where this event was going to be and we received an email from the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans' office saying:

There is not events scheduled for today, as a sign of support we are encouraging all Members of Parliament to show their support by wearing a seal fur lapen pin....

Countries around the world are acting to ban seal products. When is the government going to get its act together?

Sealing Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Madam Speaker, of course this government is in support of sealers, their families and the way of life of many eastern Canadians and people in the Arctic. Not only is it a way of life but it is also a food source for many people in the Arctic. It is a very important food source, high in protein and omega 3 oils. We are very happy on this side of the House to support our sealers.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Madam Speaker, I remind the House that it was not military and RCMP veterans and their families who put the country into deficit. Yet the government plans to cut 1,800 jobs from the Department of Veterans Affairs, thus cutting actual services for our brave heroes in this country.

So will the government put a prophylactic barrier around the Treasury Board to stop doing to DVA what it is about to do to our pensioners and our seniors in this country?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Mississauga—Brampton South
Ontario

Conservative

Eve Adams Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs

Madam Speaker, our government has been very clear: under no circumstances are we making cuts to veterans. We are maintaining all benefits to veterans. We will ensure that veterans receive services when they need them, and we are going to look for ways to improve delivery of services to our veterans by cutting red tape.

We recognize the great work done by our officials at Veterans Affairs and we know that Charlottetown is a key component of their work. It is expected that many of the changes the member is noting will be achieved mostly as a result of employees retiring over the next five years.