House of Commons Hansard #74 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was registry.

Topics

Motions in Amendment
Ending the Long-Gun Registry Act
Government Orders

2 p.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, we prefer to deal in positives, not double negatives.

In fact the hon. member has made our point. The simple fact is that most of those terrible incidents have happened with legally owned, registered firearms. So how the heck did that registration prevent that crime from happening? It just makes no sense.

Random Acts of Kindness Day
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Joe Preston Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday marked the first Random Acts of Kindness Day in St. Thomas. I was absolutely blown away by the kindness shown.

It was inspired by the life of the late Laurie Houston and initiated by her daughter Carrie, and by Williams Funeral Home director Al Hughson and myFM radio.

Local businesses showed their goodwill by sponsoring a complementary breakfast and chili lunch.

At June Rose Calwood Public School, Ms. Maunu's class performed over 230 acts of kindness.

St. Thomas went well out of its way to be kind throughout the day.

At Tim Hortons a record was set when 25 cars paid for the order of the car behind them.

Even more incredible was the generosity shown by Coad Heating and Air. This local business announced that it would donate and install a furnace for a family in need.

It is these types of things that remind us what it means to be Canadian. I would like to thank everyone who performed a random act of kindness and encourage every Canadian every day to pay it forward.

National Suicide Prevention Week
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

François Choquette Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is National Suicide Prevention Week, and I would like to acknowledge the efforts and the exemplary work of all stakeholders, counsellors and volunteers, especially at the Centre d'écoute et de prévention suicide Drummond, which is fighting to eliminate a devastating scourge that affects thousands of Canadians every year.

Heart-breaking human tragedies lie behind the alarming statistics. Consider Marjorie Raymond, the young high school student who was bullied. She believed she could end her suffering by ending her life. Suicide and bullying affect not just the victims, but also their families, their friends and everyone who witnesses them.

Suicide and bullying directly or indirectly affect all of us. We must strengthen the education and prevention programs and provide more support for them. We must show how much we care about the well-being and the personal growth of all Canadians.

As the slogan says, suicide should never be an option.

Natural Resources
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, today the Prime Minister is on his way to China to promote alternative markets for Canada's commodities.

Much has been said about the northern gateway pipeline, which would move energy from Canada to the Asian markets. Those who oppose this pipeline claim environmental concerns but these are not justified.

Farmers and residents in my riding are quite knowledgeable about the latest technology in pipeline construction. In fact, this line would come within a kilometre of my own home and would run right through our family farm, and we have no environmental concerns.

A pipeline to Asia would not only be safe but it would also create thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in wealth. Not only would it create opportunities and new technologies that would keep our air, water and land clean, but also create wealth to establish our social programs for generations to come.

The official opposition in the House wants to shut down both the pipeline and the entire oil sands industry in Alberta. This is driven by ideology, not logic; by fear-mongering, not science. This is just an example of how really out of touch it is.

North Bay Winter Carnival
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Justin Trudeau Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, our former colleague, the former member for North Bay, Anthony Rota, asked me to talk about the largest francophone festival held outside Quebec. The 49th annual Carnaval des Compagnons, which takes place every year in North Bay, will be held from February 3 to 12. This cultural and social activity is a major event that has been bringing the region's francophone community together since 1963. For 10 days in a row, all sorts of shows, sporting events, plays, traditional meals and a wide range of family activities take place. For many, the carnival's main attraction is the mascot, Bonhomme Carnaval, whose identity is never revealed until the last day.

The North Bay Carnaval des Compagnons is a magnificent festival that celebrates francophone culture. I want to congratulate this year's organizers and encourage all Canadians to put on their toques and mittens and come enjoy the carnival in North Bay.

International Year of Co-operatives
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, the United Nations has recognized the global importance of the co-operative business model by declaring 2012 as the International Year of Co-operatives with the theme, “Co-operative Enterprises Build a Better World”.

Co-ops are guided by voluntary and democratic membership, concern for community, and decision-making by consensus and participation in the local economy.

As a government, we especially appreciate the value that co-operatives provide to rural and remote communities in creating jobs and providing essential services.

There are more than 9,000 co-ops in Canada, many of them owned and controlled by first nations, Métis and Inuit people.

I would ask the membership of the House to please join me as we celebrate the International Year of Co-operatives.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, today, in Geneva, Switzerland, 16-year-old Chelsea Edwards from Attawapiskat is leading the delegation of first nations children who will tell the international community how they have been systemically discriminated against by the government.

Education is a universal human right and Canada is a signatory to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The government has a legal obligation to protect the equitable education rights of all but it has failed in this job. Nowhere is this failure more noticeable than in the mistreatment of the children of Attawapiskat: 12 years without a school; 12 years of broken promises.

No wonder the late Shannen Koostachin stood up to the government and said that the children had suffered enough. She knew that children have only one childhood. It is a precious resource that cannot be squandered under the substandard buildings, third-rate education and broken promises of the Conservative government.

Shannen had a dream that all children have the right to an education in a safe and comfy school. Meegwetch to our youth leaders who are making Shannen's dream a reality at the United Nations today.

Elevation to Cardinal
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I express my sincere congratulations to Toronto's archbishop, Thomas Collins, on his upcoming elevation to cardinal.

As this country's 16th cardinal, Archbishop Collins will become the primary spokesman for the church in English Canada. He enters the College of Cardinals as Canada's third active member, joining Cardinal Marc Ouellette, president of the Congregation of Bishops in the Vatican, and Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte, the Archbishop of Montreal.

Archbishop Collins' appointment is a wonderful reflection on him personally, on his character, his capabilities and his contributions to Canada and to the church. It also recognizes the importance of the Archdiocese of Toronto, which is home to more than one million Catholics.

In addition, Archbishop Collins' elevation to Cardinal is a great honour for Canada; a tribute to our country in the eyes of the Holy See.

As a Roman Catholic member of Parliament, I look forward to celebrating this great event in Rome on behalf of Canadians this February 18. May God bless and guide Archbishop Collins in his new responsibilities as a cardinal.

Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to commemorate and celebrate the 60th anniversary of the ascension of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to the Throne as Queen of Canada. This is an occasion marked only once before by her great-great grandmother, Queen Victoria, in 1887.

It is well-known that Her Majesty is the patron of over 600 charities and other organizations. To celebrate her 60 years of selfless service and devotion to duty, Governor General David Johnston has announced the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal as a visible and tangible way to recognize outstanding Canadians of all ages and from all walks of life.

These medals provide an opportunity to honour exceptional Canadians for their contribution to their fellow citizens, to our communities and to our country.

To that end, I invite all Canadians to recommend potential candidates for these honourable medals and wish Her Majesty many more years of good health.

God save the Queen.

Amélie & Frédérick Helping Agency
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Alexandrine Latendresse Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a society where inequality keeps growing, some exceptional people dedicate their lives to fighting poverty and isolation. That is why I am taking the time today to recognize the remarkable work done by the Amélie & Frédérick helping agency, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

This organization provides food assistance to low-income individuals and families because, yes, hundreds of thousands of Canadians are going hungry. These people have to count on organizations like Amélie & Frédérick for help because the government is turning a blind eye to this issue, preferring instead to invest in prisons, fighter jets and tax gifts for large corporations. We have a moral duty to invest a tiny fraction of this money to ensure that no one goes hungry.

In the riding of Louis-Saint-Laurent, organizations like the Amélie & Frédérick helping agency are showing that solidarity, a listening ear and generosity can change the world one small step at a time. It is by taking small steps that we achieve our goals. I am very proud to pay tribute to this organization today. Happy 20th anniversary to Amélie & Frédérick.

International Development Week
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Lois Brown Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in celebration of International Development Week 2012.

Our Minister of International Cooperation launched this year's celebration under the theme, “I Am Making a Difference”.

Over the course of International Development Week, Canadians will have the opportunity to learn more about Canada's role in international development and the significant contributions Canada makes to developing countries. This week, the focus will be on the empowerment of women and girls.

As our government has demonstrated through its commitment to the health of mothers, newborns and children, we believe that empowering women in developing countries is key to reducing poverty.

This week, Canadians will be able to take part in events across the country, such as the World University Service of Canada symposium and the SickKids International Global Child Health Day.

Canadians are known for lending a hand to those in need. We—

International Development Week
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Trinity—Spadina.

James Thomas Lemon
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, Jim Lemon loved Toronto and was known for his intellect and his deep knowledge of Toronto's urban history.

Professor Lemon was a highly respected scholar at the University of Toronto and a Guggenheim fellow. His bestselling book, Toronto Since 1918: An Illustrated History, brings the city to life. Jim chaired the Annex Residents Association and led the fight against the Spadina Expressway.

In addition to numerous articles, Jim Lemon wrote the award-winning book, The Best Poor Man's Country and Liberal Dreams and Nature's Limits: Great Cities of North America Since 1600.

As a life-long New Democrat, Jim was a Toronto school trustee and a candidate for the NDP. Throughout his life, he strove to improve the livability and the health of his neighbourhood, his city and his country.

Professor Emeritus James Thomas Lemon passed away on January 31. We will miss his passion, his intellect and his commitment to social justice. I extend our sincere condolences to his wife of 53 years, Carolyn Miller Lemon, and his children Margaret, Janet and Catherine.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, last July, the government released an integrated environment monitoring plan for the oil sands. That plan was developed in partnership with leading environmental scientists from across Canada. It outlined all the elements needed to have a world-class monitoring program. Since then, our government has continued working constructively with our Alberta counterparts to build further on that foundation.

On Friday, the Minister of the Environment had the honour of joining Alberta environment and water minister, the hon. Diana McQueen, in announcing the implementation plan of our joint oil sands monitoring system. This comprehensive new plan goes well beyond our existing provincial and federal air, land, water and biodiversity monitoring. As a result, we will be monitoring in more places more frequently for more substances.

We have one of the most accountable and transparent oil sands monitoring systems in the world. Our scientific data will be posted on the web for all the world to see and I challenge other oil-producing nations to do the same. Our government is committed to developing this important resource in an environmentally sustainable way.

My congratulations go to the Minister of the Environment on what can only be classified as the best oil sands monitoring system in the world.

Marie Thiesson
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, a celebration of life was held in Saskatoon for Marie Thiesson who passed away on January 26 after a long struggle with cancer.

After working as a stay-at-home mom for 20 years raising four sons and one daughter, Marie returned to teaching at the Saskatoon School for the Deaf. She also gained a Bachelor of Education with distinction from the U of S.

Her interest and specialized training in hearing impaired children led her to the Saskatoon public school integrated program at Brunskill School. As a founding member of the Saskatchewan Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, her help for the hearing impaired continues.

Co-founder of the Hope Cancer Help Centre, she was awarded Women of Distinction Award honours by the YWCA.

During all this time, she stood by her husband Stuart's work as executive secretary of the NFU and therefore had to put up with farm union activists, of whom I was one.

On behalf of Marie's many friends across Canada, we love her and we will miss her.