House of Commons Hansard #74 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was registry.

Topics

Victims' Rights
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Greg Rickford Kenora, ON

Mr. Speaker, the NDP has no credibility when it comes to speaking on behalf of victims. It has voted against victims several times in this place. It voted against the elimination of the faint hope clause for murderers and opposed the safe streets and communities act which would give a greater voice for victims in our justice system.

The NDP wants to silence victims, urging a well-known victims' advocate to stop speaking out about Canada's justice system.

Our government will keep bringing forward legislation that gives a voice to victims and that keeps our streets and communities safe for children and seniors.

Instead of pretending to support victims, the NDP should do the right thing for once and vote in favour of victims' rights, rather than against them.

Foreign Investment
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, four years ago, the Prime Minister went to London to tout his corporate tax cuts. He sat in a locomotive at Electro-Motive Diesel, smiled and waved and assured the workers there that their jobs were safe. Why? Because his Conservative government was giving EMD a hefty $5 million tax break.

Today, those 500 jobs are gone, shipped abroad because those workers would not accept a 50% pay cut. And that $5 million? It is gone too. This is the true legacy of the Prime Minister's so-called job creation strategy.

Once a manufacturing giant, London now struggles with closed factories and good jobs that have been shipped away. Thanks to the government's reckless corporate giveaways and hands-off approach to foreign takeovers, thousands of families in London now struggle to make ends meet. The government has failed London workers and their families and it has devastated their community.

The Prime Minister says that he is creating jobs but the truth is that he has simply lost control.

Queen's Diamond Jubilee
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, today, Canada will celebrate a very rare and historic occasion. Sixty years ago, on February 6, 1952, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II ascended to the throne as Queen of Canada. For 60 years, Her Majesty has dedicated her service to the people of all the Commonwealth of Nations and has truly exemplified the meaning of public service.

Today, the Governor General and the Prime Minister marked Her Majesty's diamond jubilee by recognizing Canadians who, like her, have dedicated themselves to service to their fellow citizens, their communities and their country.

Throughout the year, our government will celebrate this historic anniversary by supporting local community groups to organize their own grassroots celebrations, as well as providing learning materials for young people in schools across the country.

Her Majesty's diamond jubilee reminds us of the important role the Crown has played in the evolution of our country. This anniversary is an opportunity for all Canadians to be proud of this institution that has helped define who we are as Canadians.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, Canadians were disappointed when the UN Security Council failed to deal with the crisis in Syria after a veto from Russia and China.

Will the Prime Minister raise this issue in China? What pressure will he exert? In the meantime, the United States has closed its embassy in Damascus and pulled American diplomats out of Syria. Will Canada also recall its ambassador?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, our government has worked very closely with the international community to apply pressure on the Assad regime to stop the slaughter. We have been very clear about this. Assad must go.

That is why Canada announced an evacuation of all Canadians from Syria. Consular services at the embassy are down to a skeletal level. We repeat our call for Canadians to leave Syria as quickly as possible while they still can.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives remain vague about their proposal to overhaul old age security. People are really worried because the government is refusing to answer the question and to be specific.

I will ask a specific question. Will the Conservatives change the eligibility age for old age security? Will the age increase from 65 to 67, yes or no?

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we will ensure that old age security is sustainable not just for today's pensioners, but also for the next generations. It is very important to ensure that this program is sustainable and available in future for today's youth.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of State for Seniors confirmed last week that changes to the pension system will be in the next budget. It is RRSP season. People must have all the necessary information to plan for their retirement.

Will the eligibility age for OAS benefits increase from 65 to 67? Yes or no? When will this measure go into effect? We need to know.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we must ensure that the old age security program is sustainable for today's pensioners and for future generations. I can tell people who are approaching retirement age that they will not be affected by the changes. We will ensure that people my age and younger people have the opportunity to prepare their retirement plan as soon as possible, before they retire.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, we cannot protect future generations by taking away their retirement security. There is no leadership here.

Even in London, Ontario, labour, businesses and citizens are showing leadership where the government has failed. Mark's Work Wearhouse is giving Caterpillar the boot at their stores. Four hundred sixty-five families lost their breadwinner in London last Friday. Unemployment continues to rise across this land.

When is the government going to show leadership? When is it going to work on a jobs plan so Canadians can get back to work?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we remain focused, of course, on jobs and economic growth. Those are the fundamental concerns of Canadians, ensuring that we have a sustainable path for social services in the country, whether it is health care, or social benefits or pension benefits to ensure that in the long term Canadians can look forward to having the benefit of those programs and not an irresponsible attitude like the member opposite demonstrates that only looks at tomorrow morning and does not look down the road.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, in the long term Canadian families are going to be a lot worse off under the government.

Conservatives gave Caterpillar $5 million. Now the Prime Minister was willing to use the workers as an election prop for his photo op. Now that those same workers are out on the sidewalk, he just drives right by in his limousine.

The government has thrown millions of dollars away. What we have are plant closures and jobs going south: White Birch, Mabe, AstraZeneca and now Electro-Motive.

Why is the government dropping the ball? Where is the jobs plan for our hard-hit communities across the country? Where are the jobs?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, my car is actually a Chevrolet Impala from Oshawa, Ontario. The member opposite will recall voting against our plan to save General Motors and the 400,000 jobs in the auto sector across the country.

I know my friend opposite is a student of parliamentary history and I know he wants to remember, he just forgot to say so and congratulate the Prime Minister's government on its sixth anniversary of being sworn in as the government of Canada, an excellent government especially.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government spent the last week trying to prepare people for a change in old age security, a change presumably in guaranteed income supplement. No one is quite sure exactly what the Prime Minister was talking about in Davos.

I would like to ask the government today if it could at least make a commitment that none of these changes that it is talking about will take place until after 2015, so, at the very least, Canadians will have an opportunity to vote on the changes being imposed on them by the government.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister and I have been very clear all along. Anyone who is currently accessing old age security or GIS benefits will not be affected by the changes. Anyone who is nearing retirement will not be affected by the changes. We have also reassured Canadians that anyone who is young enough, like myself, or people younger than I, will have time to adjust their plans for their own retirement. We are going to ensure that they do have the time to do that.