House of Commons Hansard #90 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was refugees.

Topics

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, independent fishermen are the heart and soul of the east coast fisheries. Yet the government is about to pull the plug and eliminate fleet separation and owner-operator policies. The minister talks about consultation, but the only ones in the room are big business. Fishers in Newfoundland and Labrador staged protests to try to get the government's attention, but it is not listening.

Will the minister assure the fishermen of the east coast that these policies which protect the inshore fleet and coastal communities will be retained and even strengthened?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Mr. Speaker, we must regain our global competitiveness and provide harvesters with an operating environment where they can actually make a living. To do that we are seeking the input of Canadians. The NDP is not in favour of seeking input obviously.

We will consult, we will take advice and we will listen.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Robert Chisholm Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, once again the only people who are complaining about the state of the fishery are the corporate investors and the financiers who want a piece of the pie.

The inshore fishery in Atlantic Canada and Quebec fought back against corporate interests in the 1990s. However, it looks like it is going to have to do it again as a result of what this minister is intending to do.

I ask the minister, will he stand with New Democrats in Quebec and Atlantic Canada for inshore fishers and their communities?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Conservative

Keith Ashfield Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Mr. Speaker, the member can rest assured that I will never stand with the NDP.

We are looking at how we can improve our fishery in this country. It is in decline and we have to do something to ensure that it is sustainable in the future and that all fishers can make a proper living.

Pharmaceutical Industry
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, emergency departments, ICUs and ORs are cancelling elective surgeries because of worsening drug shortages. Liberals flagged this as an urgent problem nine months ago. We got an unsatisfactory answer from the minister who claimed that companies will give voluntary warnings about shortages. Warnings, no matter how early, do not get medications to patients who need them.

Why will the minister not support a full-scale investigation into this problem as the U.S. government is doing? Patients' lives are at stake.

Pharmaceutical Industry
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the health of Canadians is our priority. That is why the minister is continuing to monitor the effectiveness of the system to determine if changes are needed and to make sure that Canadians have access to the information they need. We are going to be acting within our authority and with our partners.

This is an international situation. We are doing better than the United States and many other countries. We are going to work to improve alternatives and facilitate information sharing. Unfortunately, we do not have the ability to force companies to produce drugs.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

March 6th, 2012 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, if this government even has such a minister. After unilaterally slashing health transfers to the provinces, although it had promised not to do so and is simply getting the provinces to pay for its delusional prison plan—which the provinces denounce as wasteful and ineffective—now the government is considering forcing the provinces to bear the cost of social assistance until the age of 67.

What other ridiculous policies do the Conservatives plan to get the provinces to pay for? My question is for the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada.

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, we are protecting transfer payments to the provinces. In fact, health transfers will continue to grow by 6% and social transfers will continue to grow by 3%. The Liberals were the ones responsible for shameful and brutal cuts to transfers to the provinces and territories.

Unlike the Liberals, we will ensure that the provinces and territories are able to provide health care, education and any other services that Canadian families need.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Harold Leduc served his country with pride and distinction. He now serves on the Veterans Review and Appeal Board. He actually served his country and knows what veterans are talking about. However, he was warned by the Veterans Review and Appeal Board that if his favourability rate was too high he would be called upon the carpet. Now his personal information has been scattered throughout the department. He feels like Sean Bruyea did when his information was scattered without his permission.

Will the ministry now apologize to Harold Leduc, remove the Veterans Review and Appeal Board, and put that money back into programs and services for our honoured veterans?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse
Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the member knows the tribunal is an arm's-length organization. It is important to show respect to veterans, but what is really at stake in the House is who really cares and supports our veterans. Instead of supporting red tape and an improvised and wasteful bureaucracy, the NDP member should support our budget initiative, support our government and vote for the veterans.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, arm's-length should not mean out of reach. It is still the Minister of Veterans Affairs who is responsible for that department. He has the right as minister to stand up and apologize to Harold Leduc. If he does not, and stays seated, your silence will be good enough.

Tonight we have a motion to actually help the department avoid cuts in the budget. Will the government now stand with the NDP and other parties to ensure that the budget for Veterans Affairs is not subject to the March 29 cuts?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse
Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our veterans deserve respect, as do all parliamentarians. What is important, and I would like to repeat it for the member, is that our Conservative government will maintain veterans' benefits. It will also cut down on red tape and creeping bureaucracy, which are burdening our veterans and their families.

If he truly wants to stand up for our veterans, I invite the member to support our Conservative budget and our initiatives to improve veterans' quality of life.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government has demonstrated its commitment to supporting strong, healthy first nations communities. We know that a quality education is key to this. Since 2006, we have built 34 new schools on reserves across the nation and have done major renovations on 22 more. More projects are ongoing.

Could the minister tell the House what recent steps have been taken to ensure that first nations children have access to quality education?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, Attawapiskat First Nation has just awarded the construction contract for a new school. Chief Spence and I--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

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