House of Commons Hansard #109 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was criminal.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, while the minister is swanning around London in a $1,000-a-day limousine, many of her employees are receiving this letter:

We regret to inform you that your position is affected under the Government of Canada Workforce adjustment measures.

In other words, these workers at CIDA are being fired.

How does the government justify the discrepancy in behaviour? The minister of the crown is going around buying $16 orange juice and staying in rooms that are unaffordable. How does the minister possibly justify this kind of an expense, this kind of an abuse? She has not paid back for the limousine.

Can the Prime Minister please tell us how—

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of International Cooperation.

Ethics
Oral Questions

April 24th, 2012 / 2:25 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the expenses are unacceptable, should never have been charged to taxpayers. I have repaid the costs associated with the changing of hotels, and I unreservedly apologize.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, I will get to my question, but first I will have to wade through the crocodile tears. The data that we are seeing—

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Timmins—James Bay has the floor.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we were hoping to hear an answer on why the Minister of International Cooperation felt that a five-star hotel was not posh enough for her.

She has apologized for that, but we did not get an answer or an apology for the $1,000 limo rides that she dinged the taxpayers for. I called the hotel and it turns out that they offer luxury free shuttles. This is about choices. This is about a minister who charged Canadian taxpayers $5,000 to joyride at the Junos.

Will she stand up and pay that—

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. government House leader.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the minister has repaid the costs associated with the change in hotels. Of course we have all just heard the minister apologize here in the House.

Our government has always believed that ministers should conduct their affairs with the greatest of respect for taxpayers. That is what we have done throughout the whole period of our government, and that is reflected in the fact that our costs for hospitality and travel are significantly below those of our Liberal predecessors.

Elections Canada
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, we are talking about a widespread pattern of her proclivity for luxury on the backs of the taxpayers. I did not hear that she is going to pay back that $1,000 limo ride. When will we hear that answer from the minister?

It is about the credibility of the government and the fact that issues now on the widespread voter fraud are becoming clear. We see that there is new data that shows thousands of misleading calls were made in key ridings against New Democrats and Liberals. Are they ready to tell us who supplied the scripts and who ran that from the Conservative war room?

Elections Canada
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, when the Chief Electoral Officer appeared before committee, he stated that he finds it troubling to hear all of the sweeping allegations of wrongdoing with no facts to support them. I guess what the Chief Electoral Officer is saying is that he is troubled every time this member stands to speak because all of his sweeping allegations have no facts to support them.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, apologies are touching, but being paid $237,000 a year to learn about ethics is a bit rich.

The Minister of International Cooperation was caught red-handed, and that is the only reason she paid back part of the money. Since yesterday, the Conservatives have been telling us that there is nothing going on and that there is not a problem, but the minister never proactively disclosed her lavish stay at the Savoy, despite the regulations.

So, instead of making cuts to international co-operation, to CIDA, or to Rights and Democracy, could the minister commit to reducing her orange juice consumption and her use of limousines?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, as I already said, the minister has repaid the costs associated with the change in hotels and she has apologized. Our government expects ministers to respect taxpayers' money, and that is reflected in the fact that our costs for hospitality and travel are significantly below those of our Liberal predecessors.

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, in connection with another of the many Conservative scandals, a recent poll conducted in the ridings most affected by allegations of election fraud reveals that it was voters who supported anyone but the Conservatives who were sent to bogus polling stations.

Perhaps the Conservatives are nostalgic for the good old days when hockey players did not wear helmets.

But Canadians do not like these scandals and these attacks against their fundamental rights. When will the government tell Canadians the truth?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, just because a Liberal poll tells us the opposite does not mean that we can forget about the election outcome. The Conservatives won because Canadians chose us to govern the country.

The hon. member should acknowledge that his party has already had to apologize for making false allegations in this regard. He should rise in the House and repeat the apology given by his NDP colleague. I invite him to do so right now.