House of Commons Hansard #123 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was rights.

Topics

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Annick Papillon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, many Canadian companies are transitioning to the new banking system, but the Conservatives are having a hard time keeping pace.

Banks and telecommunications companies have agreed to new rules for telephone payment. The government's voluntary code of conduct does not address payment by phone or through electronic banking systems. If the Conservatives do not take action, consumers will not be protected.

When will the Conservatives introduce mandatory rules for new technologies in order to protect consumers?

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, in fact, the private sector telecommunications companies and the banks are innovating, which is a good thing. It is something that we in the Conservative Party actually encourage in our country, unlike the NDP, which would like the government to run everything. That is not what we are doing.

Now we are responsible for regulation of the banking system, and I am proud to say we have the best regulated banking system in the world.

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

That fact is, Mr. Speaker, mobile payments will have a huge impact on consumers, small businesses and the digital economy, something the Conservatives do not seem to get. The Minister of Finance's own task force on mobile payments released recommendations months ago, but he has simply allowed it to gather dust.

A voluntary code that lets $5 billion in hidden merchant fees slide will not protect small businesses and consumers from being gouged even more in the new mobile market. Will the Conservatives now admit that a binding code of conduct is necessary?

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, there are two points about a code of conduct. One is not whether it is voluntary or not; it is that it is obeyed. The code of conduct that we have devised, and this is the second point, with the support of consumers, with the support of the financial sector, on consent at the end of the day, has the support of all the parties and is obeyed, is complied with precisely because of the process that we used.

With respect to payments, we have the report of the task force. I am glad the private sector is innovating, but at the end of the day the government makes the rules.

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Cowichan first nations have declared an emergency in response to recent suicides and attempted suicides. First nations suicide rates among youth are seven times higher than the national average. In the Inuit population, the rate is almost the highest in the world and 11 times our national average.

Despite supporting the Liberal opposition day on a national suicide prevention strategy, the government is actually cutting the aboriginal youth suicide prevention strategy. How on earth will that help the people of Cowichan?

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Mr. Speaker, my heart goes out to those individual families who have lost loved ones from suicide.

We are committed to working collaboratively with the first nations community and our federal partners, as well as provincial and other partners, on initiatives that would improve the wellbeing of first nations communities and individuals, including the Cowichan tribes.

We recently signed an historic tripartite agreement with the first nations in British Columbia and the provincial health departments. This will give the first nations a major role in the planning, designing and management of health care services for their communities.

The Budget
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, the minister of national defensiveness is now in his third week of reading a 31 page federal court ruling on veterans' pensions. The Conservative House leader, by contrast, has allocated a mere seven sitting days for a 425 page budget bill, a bill which amends over 70 other bills. An appalling seven days for the House to consider clawing back OAS and gutting the environment, with all kinds of time for the minister to read a 31 page ruling on veterans' pension clawbacks. Why is the House leader acting like a parliamentary bully?

The Budget
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, to the member from sarcastic inaccuracies, we will continue to look at this recommendation from the Department of Justice and we will make a decision. That is the way things are done.

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Hélène LeBlanc LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, services that Canadians depend on are not the only ones affected by the Conservatives' unilateral cuts.

Forty-seven scientists have written to the Minister of Industry to condemn his irresponsible cuts to science, cuts that jeopardize long-term research projects. This will accelerate the brain drain.

Why is the Minister of Industry restricting our ability to innovate through scientific research? Does he realize that he is chasing our scientists away?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, nothing could be further from the truth. I can tell the member opposite that our record on this side of the House is very clear. At every single opportunity we have had, we have voted to increase the investment in science, technology and research.

The record on the opposite side is just as clear. The members opposite vote no every time to our scientists, our researchers, our students, and our universities and colleges. The only question left is, when will they get on board and start supporting our scientists for once?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Dan Harris Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, we all know that the Conservatives do not like facts, especially when they come from scientists. The fact is, their cuts are undermining major research projects and driving talented innovation out of Canada. The letter from 47 leading scientists warns the Conservatives are cutting “programs so foundational to research in Canada that one would think that eliminating them was inconceivable”. Apparently not so.

Why are they cutting innovation and gutting our ability to compete in a modern, knowledge-based economy?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned earlier, every single budget the government has put forward, including the recent one, has invested more in science, technology and innovation and their development. The reason we do that is because it not only creates jobs today but it creates the high quality jobs of the future.

However, every single moment we put something forward, the NDP votes against it. It votes against money for genomics. It votes against funding for aerospace industry. It votes against basic research, like the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo. It votes against the next generation medical isotope.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

May 14th, 2012 / 3 p.m.

Conservative

Ryan Leef Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, once again, our government is demonstrating its commitment to the north by increasing the borrowing limits for the territories. This important action will help governments invest in needed infrastructure projects, bringing increased jobs and long-term prosperity to northern communities.

Surprisingly, the NDP member from the Northwest Territories has been quoted as opposing improved measures that will support northern economies, despite the strong support from the territorial governments.

Could the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development explain to the House, and the out of touch NDP critic, why these measures and this legislation are so important?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, increased borrowing limits for the territories is a vital step toward increased prosperity for northern communities. It will be used to support critical infrastructure projects such as the road between Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk, a project the NWT government and aboriginal leadership support.

I urge the NDP member from NWT to reverse his stance and support Bill C-38. Northerners benefit from this government's successful agreement with the territories.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, besides the $380 million cut for poor countries, the Conservative government has denied funding for most NGOs doing hard work in these areas. One of the most dedicated and effective among these groups is the Canadian Nurses Association. Through its global health partnership program, Canadian nurses have worked with groups in over 40 countries over 35 years. This year, the Conservatives have given them the axe.

If the nurses are not good enough, who is?