House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was apology.

Topics

Canadian Co-operatives
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, with some 9,000 co-ops, 18 million members and some net worth of $350 billion or $360 billion, I think co-ops have a great foundation to continue this work on their own.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, the defence minister said several times that operating costs for the F-35 would be the same as the CF-18 operating costs. Now, the former parliamentary secretary is admitting that the F-35 will be much more expensive to fly than our CF-18s, roughly $12,000 more per hour.

Here is another contradiction. He now admits that the delivery of the planes will be pushed back by several years due to delays in rising costs.

Is the parliamentary secretary making up numbers or is this a sign of an impending cabinet shuffle?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we will not speculate. What I would suggest is that the member take a look at the recommendations that will be coming out when the secretariat has a chance to bring all of these departments together to look at this important procurement project.

I would also suggest and encourage him to support this important replacement of the CF-18. This is a very major investment for our country. It is great for the aerospace industry. It will ensure that we have the ability to participate in Norad and NATO missions in the future. That is why we are pursuing this important replacement project, as we are on a number of fronts when it comes to our military.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have known for some time that operating the F-35s is going to cost more than it does for the CF-18s, but once again, the Conservatives have tried to conceal this fact and discredit anyone who questions their statements. Now a member of their own government has admitted that it will cost $12,000 more an hour than it costs for the CF-18s.

Will the Minister of National Defence finally admit that he has underestimated the costs once again?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as I have said a number of times in this House, we are proceeding with this important replacement of the CF-18s. There is a need to do so because an operational gap would occur if we do not make these investments.

The hon. member herself should know that these investments will happen over time. There has been no contract signed. There has been no money spent on the actual acquisition. It was, in fact, a previous government that entered us into an MOU to replace the CF-18s some years ago.

Now a very comprehensive review is taking place, led by a secretariat. There will be independent oversight and greater reporting to Parliament and the public, and we are moving ahead on that basis.

Veterans
Oral Questions

May 18th, 2012 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives want to spend money on an F-35 program run amok when they are not even doing enough to guarantee support services for our troops returning home from missions. A recent report confirms that veterans are not receiving the mental health care they need. Many are suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and there are not enough health professionals to help them. Again this week, two specialists left the Petawawa base.

Why is this government failing to ensure that soldiers returning from missions have access to the help they need?

Veterans
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

That is not true, Mr. Speaker. Once again and as always, this hon. member is providing inaccurate information.

We are in fact relocating professionals to Petawawa, in order to have them closer to those members of the military who will need that support. We have had to do so because of retirements and because individuals have transferred to new jobs. This is common turnaround within the Canadian Forces.

We are moving forward to hire more mental health professionals. We, in fact, have a goal of doubling the number. We are moving rapidly in that direction and will continue to support those soldiers, their families and our veterans when they need those services.

Veterans
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, talk is cheap. Just two weeks ago, a damning report slammed the government's lack of mental health treatment for Afghan veterans. It called the situation a crisis.

Currently, the 6,000-member base in Petawawa has no psychologists and just one working psychiatrist.

These brave soldiers who risked their lives deserve to have their health care needs met. Why is the government not investing more into the health of our men and women returning from combat? It is time to back up words with action.

Veterans
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly what we are doing. We are doubling the number of mental health professionals within the employment of the Canadian Forces. We have made significant investments through the legacy of care. We are locating mental health professionals at Petawawa to do exactly what the member suggests: to make them more accessible and to ensure that those investments are providing the service when and where it is needed.

However, the member might have missed that, because in his haste to point this out, he is forgetting the fact that he and his party have voted against every investment we made to--

Veterans
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, our government has kept its promise to end the long gun registry. This registry has been ineffective in improving public safety and a huge waste of taxpayer dollars.

Now we have the situation of provincial governments trying to bring in long gun registries by the back door. The leader of the NDP has already said that he will bring back the long gun registry, should he get the chance.

Would the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety please tell us what the government is doing to defend the rights of law-abiding gun owners?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to answer that question today.

As part of our government's ongoing measures to reduce the deficit, we will need to end the waiver on firearms licensing fees. However, in order to help law-abiding gun owners, we are providing extra time for them to renew their licence for five years, at no cost. Those with restricted and prohibited licences can apply for a no-cost licence until September 17, 2012. Those with non-restricted licences have a whole year to apply.

This is good news for law-abiding gun owners and good news for taxpayers.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, this past Tuesday we asked the Minister of the Environment to tell us when the new regulations for mining and oil and gas projects would be announced. Once again, he refused to give us a clear answer, claiming that consultations were ongoing.

Yesterday in Bonn, Germany, a government representative announced regulations for 2013, which is quite soon.

Did the minister intentionally mislead the House or is he so disconnected from his department that he did not even know that the regulations were ready?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the NDP fails to understand the need to balance environmental stewardship with economic growth. That is why we hear them talking about pitting workers in one section of the country against workers in another.

With regard to oil and gas regulations, we are working closely with industry to ensure that a plan comes up that is sustainable, that works and that achieves the results we are looking for.

I should note that in the most recent greenhouse gas emissions inventory, we saw the economy grow by 3.2% and greenhouse gas emissions stabilize.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, what is the plan?

The government clearly has no idea what the word “transparency” means. Canadians should not have to rely on German news to find out what their government is up to. The minister has a duty to Canadians and to this House. The only thing we got from him was smoke and mirrors and personal attacks.

Having tried Switzerland and Germany, can the minister tell us which country the government will make its next announcement in?