House of Commons Hansard #130 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was co-operatives.

Topics

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Rick Dykstra St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, in an effort to save face after attacking Canadians who work in resource industries as a “disease”, the NDP leader is going to do a tour of Canada's oil sands. This politically motivated trip is something the NDP should have done before attacking large sectors of Canada's economy.

Sadly, the NDP leader's attack on the resource sector as a “disease” is not the first time he has shown Canadians his ideologically driven opposition to these jobs. In December 2007, the NDP leader said that Canada's “very balanced economy that includes a very strong resource sector” is a “problem”.

Unlike the NDP which opposes job creation, our government recognizes the importance of Canada's resource industries. It is clear to us and all Canadians that the only disease is the belief in the NDP that attacking hard-working Canadians is somehow acceptable. It is not on this side of the House.

Mailing of Human Remains
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians were horrified to hear of the senseless and cowardly mailing of human remains to Conservative Party headquarters, and the interception of a second package at Canada Post's Ottawa sorting centre.

Our sympathies go out to the staff at the Conservative Party offices who opened the package. Our thoughts are also with Canada Post employees who had to deal with the second package containing human remains. They were all victims of an outrageous and reprehensible act. We encourage anyone with information on this crime to contact police immediately.

On behalf of New Democrats, and I think all members of the House across all party lines, we stand in solidarity with postal workers and especially the Conservative Party staff. We condemn these acts and stand united together against these crimes.

Restoring Rail Service Legislation
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Paul Calandra Oak Ridges—Markham, ON

Mr. Speaker, CP Rail, the company whose trains carry over $500 million for the Canadian economy, has been on strike for almost a week. The trains have stopped, products are sitting on cars and Canadian jobs are at risk. Our government is acting to protect these jobs and the Canadian economy.

The House of Commons sat late last night to pass this critical legislation, but now the leader of the Liberal Party is threatening to delay the bill at the next stage. The other place has a long tradition of dealing with urgent legislation in one day.

The member for Wascana has once again turned his back on the western Canadian farmer and now the Liberals will have to explain to Canadians the loss of over $75 million a day to the Canadian economy. If they choose to delay, will the Liberals pay back this $75 million, and if they will, will they also finally pay back the $40 million that they stole from Canadians?

The Environment
Oral Questions

May 30th, 2012 / 2:20 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Commissioner of the Environment offered disturbing testimony before the parliamentary committee that is studying the Conservatives' Trojan Horse bill. According to the commissioner, because of this bill, the number of environmental assessments is going to plummet.

This is huge: 99% of environmental assessments will disappear.

Why does the Prime Minister want to attack our environment and our economy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, our objective is to ensure clear environmental assessments. A thorough job will be done by a certain deadline. However, in the end, a decision must be made.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the question is clear. Why is the government cutting environmental protection for Canadians?

The environment commissioner testified that environmental screenings will be reduced from as many as 6,000 per year to as few as 20 or 30. Ninety-nine per cent of the projects that are now screened will not have any screening at all and will, in fact, be rubber-stamped by the government. Some of these are major mining projects, oil sands projects and even some offshore drilling projects, all of which will be rubber-stamped by the government.

How can the Prime Minister justify these reckless attacks on our economy and our environment?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Of course, Mr. Speaker, there is no such thing. What the government is doing with these changes to environmental assessment is ensuring that there will be a single review rather than duplicative reviews.

It also ensures that the focus and attention will be obviously on the biggest projects, and as well, that decisions will be rendered within a reasonable time period. That will be up to two years.

It is still a very thorough assessment, but it is important that we not duplicate our work, and that we are able to give certainty to investors about the timeline for decisions.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians will judge the Prime Minister on his destructive actions, not his false assurances.

Conservatives are also slashing the employment insurance program, which does not belong to them but to the workers who paid into it, without consulting businesses, without consulting workers, without consulting the provinces and without even the integrity to mention this even once in the last federal campaign.

The reality is these changes do not connect people with jobs. They connect people with provincial welfare programs.

When will the government acknowledge that its cynical scheme targets the very businesses, communities and workers upon which our economy relies?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is completely the opposite. Far from ending employment insurance, employment insurance will very much be there for people who cannot find jobs within their qualifications and within their region.

There are, however, as we know, growing labour shortages in this country. We want to make every effort we can to make sure that people can find jobs within their region and within their qualifications. In every case, the way these rules have been structured, they will be able to find work that would pay them more than EI.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Nycole Turmel Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, with the employment insurance reform, the Conservatives are attacking communities that depend on seasonal industries, the film industry and the construction industry—in short all Canadians who do contract work to pay the bills.

The Conservatives are penalizing Canadians for their career choices. They are penalizing entire communities of workers because they chose atypical or seasonal occupations.

Why did the Conservatives decide to destroy Canada's economic diversity by attacking workers?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, nothing could be further from the truth.

The reforms that we are making to the employment insurance system are designed to help unemployed workers who have lost their jobs find another one in order to improve their well-being and that of their families. We will help them find these jobs; however, if unemployed workers cannot find jobs, employment insurance will be there to help them, as it always has been.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Nycole Turmel Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the reality is altogether different. By intervening, the Conservatives will create downward pressure on the wages of all workers. No matter what the issue, this government insists on picking winners and losers and dismantling entire sectors of the Canadian economy. The Conservatives believe that contract workers are lazy.

I have news for them: contract workers are honest people who work hard to find and honour their contracts. They pay their EI contributions in order to be eligible for benefits.

Why is the government stealing food from their tables?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, she is wrong for two reasons.

First, we want to help people find work in order to improve their well-being and that of their families. The NDP does not support these initiatives.

Second, that party, the NDP, is trying to pit Canada's regions against one another. The NDP believes that improvements in one region of this great country are detrimental to another region. We find that totally unacceptable.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if the Prime Minister could tell us today what the anticipated reductions in employment insurance payments are expected as a result of the changes being proposed by the government. It is clear that this is a money-saving exercise.

I wonder if the Prime Minister could tell us exactly what kind of money will be saved in this regard.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we are not actually pursuing this as a money-saving exercise. Our objective is to match people with jobs.

As I said earlier, we have labour shortages in this country but, at the same time, we also have many people who need work and are not finding work. There is enhanced opportunity to get people back to work. This government has a strong record in that regard. We want to ensure that we have the assistance in place that will allow people to get work they are qualified for in their area and provide a better living standard for themselves and their families.