House of Commons Hansard #137 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was water.

Topics

Retirement Congratulations
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Montreal Canadiens had only seven Stanley Cup wins when Red Fisher started his career as a sports reporter. In the almost six decades since, both Red and the Habs have had many successes to their names.

A National Newspaper Award winner for his coverage of the Canadiens and all sports, he has had an amazing career. He started reporting on the local hockey club the night of the Maurice Richard riot. His reporting has chronicled many important moments in Montreal and Canadian sporting life ever since. In terms of longevity, he is the longest-serving beat writer of any national hockey league club.

Since the rise of online sports coverage, hockey fans the world over have been able to read his Montreal Gazette articles. I, like many sports fans in the government, will miss his regular columns.

My Conservative colleagues and I want to wish Mr. Fisher a long, happy retirement.

Central Development Corporation
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, I thank the staff, past and present, of Central Development Corporation for their great work in assisting communities, individuals and businesses with economic development initiatives. The CDC has been instrumental in economic and community development in my riding of Malpeque, but sadly, as with all the economic development organizations, it is being eliminated by this government.

Responsible for managing over $9 million in assets, small industrial development parks and projects too many to mention, the CDC has made an amazing contribution to communities. The local board of directors provided the advice that is in great part responsible for its success. I thank it, indeed. Gone too will be its assistance to the young millionaires program, which for over 20 years instilled young people with the skills necessary to thrive in the business world.

In closing, I have no choice but to condemn the Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) (La Francophonie) for gutting the CDC, which will deprive P.E.I. of the localized support for economic development.

The Economy
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the indulgence of one becomes the burden of another through excessive taxation. The excess of one generation becomes the yoke of the next through government borrowing. The profligacy of one nation becomes the hardship of another through international bailout. Everybody takes, nobody makes, work does not pay, indulgence does not cost, money is free and money is worthless.

Such is the sumptuous Euro welfare state that has led nine euro currency countries to be downgraded, including Portugal and Greece, which now have debt levels that are considered junk status by all rating agencies.

However, no worry. The NDP wants Canadian taxpayers to come to the rescue with a multi-billion dollar international bailout.

The NDP's policies have led to the kinds of consequences we see in Europe. Canada acted responsibly with low-debt, low-tax and low-cost government. That is why we are not in that situation. Canadian dollars will stay in the Canadian economy to create Canadian jobs.

41st General Election
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Dan Harris Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadian voters need to be saved from the Conservatives.

New and disturbing information is coming to light about Conservative interference at a polling station in Toronto during the last election. According to new reports, the Etobicoke Centre Conservative campaign manager, Roman Gawur, caused a disturbance at the St. Demetrius seniors residence, blocking seniors from voting for over an hour. The deputy returning officer called the Conservative campaign manager's actions “obstruction”.

Even more insidious is that it seemed premeditated. There was a bus waiting to leave for a day trip to Casino Rama, but the Conservative-created disturbance went on just long enough to ensure some seniors did not get a chance to vote.

Conservatives will be even more scared in the next election when seniors have an opportunity to pass judgment on the Conservatives' attack on retirement pensions and security. Dirty tricks at election time have become routine with these Conservatives. Shame on them.

Political Donations
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, twice in the last year the NDP has been found in breach of Canada's election financing laws.

First, in August, it was forced by Elections Canada to admit it was guilty of illegally issuing tax receipts to a left-wing think tank. On Tuesday, Elections Canada confirmed that the NDP's union sponsorships at its 2011 convention were unquestionably illegal donations. It has been forced to pay them back. Yesterday, I wrote to the Commissioner of Elections Canada to ask him to review what seem to be corporate sponsorships, during the NDP's 2012 leadership convention, found in its leadership convention guide.

What has been the NDP's reaction to these charges? Have the members come out and apologized? No. In fact, the NDP member for Saint-Jean said that these illegal sponsorships were none of Canadians' business. The NDP members need to come clean and be transparent with Canadians about these sponsorships. Just how much illegal money have they raked in anyway?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the former Conservative chair of the Standing Committee on the Environment and Sustainable Development, Bob Mills, took his colleagues to task. He gave a stern warning that Canadians will pay dearly for the Conservatives' imbalanced approach to the environment.

By doing away with the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy, the Conservatives are losing valuable research and analysis expertise, and this will weaken our economy and our environment.

Do they understand this?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, there is no shortage of environmental advocacy organizations, science-based organizations, advocacy organizations and public policy think tanks in Canada and around the world that can inform this valuable policy development. We certainly think that a lot has changed in the last 25 years.

I particularly liked Bob Mills when he spoke so passionately against the Kyoto protocol. I wonder whether my friend opposite agrees with Bob Mills on that?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I wonder how bad it has to get before these guys will listen? It is not just Bob Mills sounding the alarm now. There are also former Conservative ministers like Tom Siddon, who warns that the changes to the Fisheries Act are making Swiss cheese out of fisheries protections.

Conservatives are ignoring anyone who happens to disagree with them, ramming through a bill that puts our environment, our fisheries and the communities that rely upon these industries at risk. When will they finally take the good advice of their former friends and split this bill, or are they just waiting until they have no friends left at all?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have brought forward some common sense reforms to environmental approvals, including in the Fisheries Act, to ensure that we focus on protecting fish habitat and not on over-regulating farmers. We believe that the focus of federal regulation should be on fish and fish habitat rather than making bizarre rulings and whatnot into standard agricultural practices on farmers. That is exactly what we are doing. We think it is the right thing to do. We think it is popular. We think it is important to our economic development. We have seen 7,700 net new jobs created. That is a good start. We remain focused on jobs and the economy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, what Conservatives would like Canadians to believe is that to protect fish habitat what they need to do is strip the protection of fish habitat out of the Fisheries Act. Canadians will not have a chance to have their say on this bill because Conservatives are ramming it through Parliament. Why are they so afraid of accountability that they used to be such a great fan of?

The Auditor General's Office has told us that over 95% of environmental assessments will now be eliminated completely. Why are Conservatives doing just about anything the oil and gas lobbyists ask for? Will they split the bill, take a deep breath and finally show a little respect for Canadians?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have had an unprecedented amount of debate on this year's budget, on economic action plan 2012, on the budget itself and the debate. After the Minister of Finance gave a speech of less than one hour, the opposition had its opportunity to begin debate. What did it do? It had one of its critics filibuster for three full days. That does not show a lot of respect for taxpayers.

Our budget, budget 2012, is focused on jobs and the economy. Today we saw the creation of 36,000 net new jobs in the manufacturing sector. That is good news for Canada's economy. That is nothing more than a good start. That is why we remain focused, like a laser, on job creation and economic growth and will continue to do so.

The Budget
Oral Questions

June 8th, 2012 / 11:20 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, people of all political stripes are condemning the budget implementation bill. Conservative provincial premiers, former Conservative ministers and even Conservative backbenchers are opposed to the bill and the Conservatives' approach.

In addition, seniors' advocacy groups are voicing their strong opposition to cuts to old age security. Will these groups be treated in the same manner as environmental protection groups?

Do the Conservatives also want to eliminate groups that represent the interests of the people who built our country?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, let us remind the opposition what is actually in the budget bill, what they claim after a few short minutes. Our finance minister delivered his speech here in the House of Commons. It was only minutes after that, obviously before the NDP members had read the budget, that they said they were going to oppose it. I would like to know if they have actually changed their minds? Are they still going to vote against extending the hiring credit for small and medium-sized businesses? Are they going to vote against funding for skills and job training? Are they going to vote against funding for infrastructure? I would like the answer to that. Most of all, why would they vote against that?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, after question period I would be more than happy to actually explain to the parliamentary secretary the difference between a budget and a budget implementation act.

Six years ago, when the Prime Minister was out on the campaign trail, he not only promised that he would not cut OAS for current retirees, he said that he would, “fully preserve the Old Age Security...and all projected future increases to these programs.” It is no wonder the Conservatives want to stop seniors from voting when they are breaking their promise to protect the OAS.

Will the Conservatives stop their attack on the OAS or are they prepared to pay the price for it in the next election?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague the Minister of State for Finance explained, our priority is job creation and economic growth for this country. That includes helping Canadians get back to work.

It also includes making sure that we have the resources to ensure that Canadians, both today and future generations, have access to an old age security system that is sustainable for future generations. We are looking after our seniors today, and those of future generations.