House of Commons Hansard #149 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was economy.

Topics

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I am rising to inform the House that U.S. military deserter, Kimberly Rivera, has been removed from Canada and is now back in the United States.

Our government does not believe that the administration of the president or the president himself, in any way, shape or form, is going to persecute Ms. Rivera. In fact, she has had every opportunity in this country, despite the fact that not one of the applications from an American war deserter has been successful in Canada. Each and every one of them has been upheld by the federal court in terms of the Immigration and Refugee Board denying them. It is the right thing to do and we are going to make sure we—

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Hamilton Mountain.

Poverty
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, food banks across Canada are busier than ever. In Ottawa alone the use of food banks is up between 6% and 8% just over last year. Food prices are on the rise, household debt is at an all-time high, and low- and middle-income families have to work more hours just to get by.

When will the government realize that Canadians are struggling and finally take concrete steps to help them make ends meet?

Poverty
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we have been doing exactly that for the last six years and every single thing we have brought forward to help Canadians who are facing tough financial times has been voted against by the NDP. Let us face it, whether it is introducing the working income tax benefit to help people get over the welfare wall, increasing the amount that seniors are allowed to be exempt for in the guaranteed income supplement, or increasing the GIS by its largest amount in decades, the NDP votes against it every time. Its hypocrisy is, quite frankly, breathtaking.

The Economy
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Independent

Bruce Hyer Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government has given us the largest trade deficit and the largest budget deficit in Canadian history, stalled economic growth, unemployment well over 8%, youth unemployment double that and now the communist Chinese are allowed to scoop our key resources.

There are 1.4 million unemployed people from St. John's to Thunder Bay to Bella Coola who want to know: When will the Prime Minister rethink his failed economic policies?

The Economy
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, I understand the Prime Minister is actually going to New York to receive an award for his exemplary leadership not only at home but around the world.

The policies that this government has put in place have helped businesses employ 770,000 Canadians that were not employed before the recession. Our banks are the strongest. They have been noted as being the strongest for the fifth year in a row by the World Economic Forum. Do not talk—

The Economy
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

That brings question period to a close.

I will hear a point of order before I move on to the Thursday question.

The hon. member for Sudbury.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to give my hon. colleague from across the way, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, an opportunity to correct an inaccuracy during question period today. I know the government has been making up facts this week, but what he does not realize is that in the last—

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Members know that a debate as to the facts is not a point of order. I would encourage the hon. member for Sudbury to maybe bring it up in a different question period.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I would ask for the unanimous consent of the House to table the old provisions of the EI Act, as I know the Prime Minister and the Minister of Human Resources did not really have the full low down on—

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House?

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

No.

Business of the House
Business of the House
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I welcome my hon. colleague across the way back to this session. It is as boisterous as when we left it.

In an effort to provide some hope for Canadians that Parliament can work together, my Thursday question this week cites legislation that the NDP, the official opposition, would be keen to work with the government in getting these bills to committee stage. I will name them specifically and see if my hon. colleague can make some mention of them: Bill C-21, political loans; Bill C-30, the lawful access, which has only five more hours of debate until it goes to committee before second reading; Bill C-32, the civil marriage act; and Bill C-37, the victims surcharge act.

The opposition is interested in working with the government to see all of those go through to committee stage and seeks to start this parliamentary session in a hopefully more productive tone than the one that we ended with last session.

Business of the House
Business of the House
Oral Questions

September 20th, 2012 / 3:05 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, first, let me formally welcome back all hon. members to the House of Commons from their productive summers in their ridings, which I trust they had, working with and listening to constituents.

On the government side of the House, we heard loud and clear that the priority of Canadians remains the economy. It is our priority too. Not one person raised with me a desire to see a $21 billion carbon tax implemented to raise the price of gas, groceries and winter heat. I do not expect the member will see that in our agenda.

I also want to extend a warm welcome, on behalf of Conservatives, to this year's class of pages. I am certain that their time with us, here in our hard-working, productive and, I hope, orderly House of Commons, will lead to lifelong memories.

Yesterday, we were able to pass Bill C-42, Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act, at second reading. I want to thank hon. members for their co-operation on that.

I am optimistic that we will see similar co-operation to allow us to finish second reading debate tomorrow on Bill C-37, Increasing Offenders' Accountability for Victims Act, which the hon. Leader of the Opposition talked about.

This afternoon, of course, is the conclusion of the New Democrats' opposition day. As announced earlier this week, Tuesday will be a Liberal opposition day.

On Monday, the House will start debate on Bill C-43, the faster removal of foreign criminals act. This legislation would put a stop to foreign criminals relying on endless appeals in order to delay their removal from Canada and it sends a strong signal to foreign criminals that Canada is not a safe haven. I hope we will have support from the opposition parties for rapid passage of the bill designed to make our communities safer.

Starting on Wednesday, the House will debate Bill C-44, the helping families in need act. Once the opposition caucuses have met to discuss this important bill, I am confident they would want to support the early passage of this legislation as well. It would enhance the income support provided to families whose children have been victims of crime or are critically ill.

If we have additional time tomorrow or next week, the House will consider Bill C-15, the strengthening military justice in the Defence of Canada Act; Bill S-2, the family homes on reserves and matrimonial interests or rights act; and Bill S-8, the safe drinking water for first nations act.

We are interested in Bill C-21, which deals with accountability for political loans and making that consistent with the other political contribution provisions. If we have a consensus among parties to bring that forward, we will certainly do that.

Similarly, if we can see a consensus among parties on passing Bill C-32 as it has been presented to the House, we would be pleased to do that on unanimous consent.

The House resumed consideration of the motion.