An Act to amend the Telecommunications Act (Internet neutrality)

This bill was last introduced in the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session, which ended in March 2011.

This bill was previously introduced in the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session.

Sponsor

Charlie Angus  NDP

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of May 29, 2009
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment amends the Telecommunications Act to prohibit telecommunications service providers from engaging in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on its source, ownership, destination or type, subject to certain exceptions. This enactment also prohibits telecommunications service providers from preventing a user from attaching any device to their network and requires telecommunications service providers to make information about the user’s access to the Internet available to the user.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Telecommunications ActRoutine Proceedings

May 29th, 2009 / 12:10 p.m.
See context

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-398, An Act to amend the Telecommunications Act (Internet neutrality).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today and, with the help of my colleague from Burnaby—New Westminster, introduce this bill that would change section 36 of the Telecommunications Act.

It is very important as Canadians that we maintain the innovation agenda of the Internet. We have known that the importance of the Internet has been based on the principle that all content that moves along the pipes moves at the same rate and that the innovators and the consumers at the end of the pipes are the ones in charge of deciding what content has priority, not the telecom giants. We need to ensure that we are not dealing with the efforts of throttling, interference of traffic on the Internet.

This is a very simple and straightforward bill that would ensure that the telecommunication service provider shall not engage in network management practices that favour, degrade or prioritize any content, application or service transmitted over a broadband network based on its source, ownership, destination or type.

There are, of course, provisions for proper management of the Internet traffic but I think my colleagues will agree that if we are to maintain a 21st century innovation economy, the principle of net neutrality must be protected.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)