National Public Transit Strategy Act

An Act to establish a National Public Transit Strategy

This bill was last introduced in the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session, which ended in March 2011.

Sponsor

Olivia Chow  NDP

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of Feb. 3, 2011
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment establishes a national strategy to promote and enhance the use of fast, affordable and accessible public transit for Canadians.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

National Public Transit Strategy ActRoutine Proceedings

February 3rd, 2011 / 10:05 a.m.
See context

NDP

Olivia Chow NDP Trinity—Spadina, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-615, An Act to establish a National Public Transit Strategy.

Mr. Speaker, happy New Year of the Rabbit.

Canadians deserve and need fast, reliable, affordable and accessible public transit. However, unlike all other G8 or OECD countries, Canada does not have a national public transit strategy, nor does it have a transit policy or program.

My national public transit strategy act seeks to establish a legislative framework, with the federal government taking a leadership role in coordinating all levels of government in an effort to maintain and expand public transit across the country. Together, a public transit plan would be developed and the plan would establish a clear mechanism so there would be sustainable, predictable and long-term funding for public transit.

The national public transit act or strategy has been long requested by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, the big city mayors caucus, the Canadian Urban Transit Association, the urban transportation task force and transit authorities from coast to coast to coast. Together, they point to an $18 billion gap in transit infrastructure needs. They lament that there is a piecemeal approach through various funding sources and that every year billions of dollars are lost due to traffic congestion while, simultaneously, transit authorities struggle to meet demands.

Investment in public transit creates jobs, fuels economic growth and contributes to clean air, decreased congestion and lower greenhouse gas emissions. It is high time Canada had a comprehensive public transit strategy.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)