An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (time limit)

This bill was last introduced in the 41st Parliament, 2nd Session, which ended in August 2015.

Sponsor

Marc Garneau  Liberal

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of Dec. 10, 2013
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment amends the Canadian Human Rights Act to extend the time limit for filing a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission from one year to two years.

It also requires the Commission to consider a complaint that is filed after the two-year period allowed if it is of the opinion that the complainant was prevented from filing it within that time period.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Canadian Human Rights ActRoutine Proceedings

December 10th, 2013 / 10:05 a.m.
See context

Liberal

Marc Garneau Liberal Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-564, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (time limit).

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise to introduce a private member's bill that would extend the time limit for filing a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission from one year to two years.

In addition, my bill clarifies the circumstances in which the commission can consider a complaint regarding an incident that happened outside that limitation period.

The Canadian Human Rights Act is modelled on the simple, indisputable principle that all individuals should have an opportunity equal with other individuals to make for themselves the lives that they are able and wish to have and to have their needs accommodated, consistent with their duties and obligations as members of society, without being hindered in or prevented from doing so by discriminatory practices based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, marital status, family status or disability.

That is a well-established principle in Canadian society, and so much the better. However, there is always room for improvement. We need to remain vigilant in defending those rights.

My bill is a modest attempt at improving the current law by giving Canadians who are suffering the consequences of a human rights violation a bit more time to have their voices heard.

I close by noting that today the United Nations celebrates the 65th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)