An Act to amend the Ministries and Ministers of State Act and the Salaries Act (limitation on the number of ministers and ministers of State)

This bill was last introduced in the 41st Parliament, 2nd Session, which ended in August 2015.

Sponsor

Brent Rathgeber  Independent

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of April 29, 2015
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment amends the Ministries and Ministers of State Act to limit the number of ministers of State that may be assigned to preside over ministries of State or to assist a minister. It also amends the Salaries Act to limit to 26 the total number of ministers and ministers of State who may be paid a salary under that Act.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Ministries and Ministers of State ActRoutine Proceedings

April 29th, 2015 / 3:45 p.m.
See context

Independent

Brent Rathgeber Independent Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-672, An Act to amend the Ministries and Ministers of State Act and the Salaries Act (limitation on the number of ministers and ministers of State).

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me to rise in this House and table an act to amend the Ministries and Ministers of State Act and the Salaries Act.

Its purpose is to limit the number of ministers and ministers of state to 26. The number 26 was chosen because statutorily there are 20 federal government departments plus six federal agencies whose statutory heads are all ministers.

When this government assumed office in 2006, we had a lean cabinet of 26 members. In the words of the Prime Minister, “Designed for work, not for show; more focus and purpose; less process and cost”.

Besides saving taxpayers an estimated $12 million to $15 million annually, reducing the size of cabinet would address the much larger problem of imbalance between the executive and legislative branches of government.

Making cabinet smaller reduces the mathematical probability that any member will ever be asked to serve. This would force MPs to take their responsibilities as legislators seriously, placing the interests of their constituents above their own career advancement.

Fewer rewards to be distributed means less control over the backbenches and ultimately a more functional Parliament.

Accordingly, I ask all members to support this important democratic reform legislation.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)