Communications Security Establishment Review Committee Act

An Act to Establish the Communications Security Establishment Review Committee and to make consequential amendments to other Acts

This bill was last introduced in the 41st Parliament, 2nd Session, which ended in August 2015.

Sponsor

Brent Rathgeber  Independent

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of May 13, 2015
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment establishes the Communications Security Establishment Review Committee.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Communications Security Establishment Review Committee ActRoutine Proceedings

May 13th, 2015 / 3:25 p.m.
See context

Independent

Brent Rathgeber Independent Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-679, An Act to Establish the Communications Security Establishment Review Committee and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure for me to rise and introduce the communications security establishment review committee act.

The proposed legislation would establish a five-person civilian committee to review the activities of Canada's signals intelligence agency. It would be a technical committee comprised of a full-time chairperson, an information technology expert, a security expert, a privacy expert and a lawyer with expertise in civil procedure.

The committee would conduct statutory reviews but would also investigate complaints made by Canadians and would report any violations to the Attorney General and the Director of Public Prosecutions for further investigation.

The committee may also conduct joint reviews with the Security Intelligence Review Committee and the RCMP Complaints Committee. The committee would be empowered to compel persons and documents, and also to take evidence under oath.

We know that Canada's electronic spy agency works collaboratively with the NSA, farms in metadata, and sifts through millions of videos and documents downloaded online.

Given that Bill C-51 would increase the reach of Canada's entire spy agency establishment without any additional oversight, I encourage all hon. members to support this legislation and defend the privacy rights of all law-abiding Canadians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)