Protection of Freedom of Conscience Act

An Act to amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying)

Sponsor

David Anderson  Conservative

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of Oct. 30, 2018

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Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment amends the Criminal Code to make it an offence to intimidate a medical practitioner, nurse practitioner, pharmacist or any other health care professional for the purpose of compelling them to take part, directly or indirectly, in the provision of medical assistance in dying.

It also makes it an offence to dismiss from employment or to refuse to employ a medical practitioner, nurse practitioner, pharmacist or any other health care professional for the reason only that they refuse to take part, directly or indirectly, in the provision of medical assistance in dying.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Protection of Freedom of Conscience ActRoutine Proceedings

October 30th, 2018 / 10:05 a.m.
See context

Conservative

David Anderson Conservative Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-418, an act to amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying).

Mr. Speaker, it is my honour today to table the protection of freedom of conscience act. The purpose of this is to protect the rights of health care professionals who conscientiously object to participation in medical assistance in dying, making it an offence to intimidate or try to force a health care professional to be involved in this activity. It also makes it an offence to fire or refuse to employ a health care professional for refusing to take part, either directly or indirectly, in the provision of medical assistance in dying.

I believe it is time to stand up for the doctors and health care providers who are not willing to leave their core ethics behind when they are at a patient's bedside. Access to medical assistance in dying and the right to conscientious objection are not mutually exclusive.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)