This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

Evidence of meeting #26 for National Defence in the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament’s site, as are the minutes.) The winning word was aircraft.

A recording is available from Parliament.

On the agenda

MPs speaking

Also speaking

Bill Matthews  Vice-President Marketing, Magellan Aerospace Corporation
Nathalie Bourque  Vice-President, Public Affairs and Global Communications, CAE
Major-General  Retired) Richard Bastien (Vice-President, Business Development, L-3 Communications MAS Inc.
Daniel Verreault  Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.
Bruce Lennie  Vice-President, Business Development and Government Affairs, Rolls-Royce

5:15 p.m.

Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.

Daniel Verreault

That is correct.

5:15 p.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Conservative Edmonton Centre, AB

Thank you.

That's all I wanted to get out. I wish people would actually read the MOU. They'd have a better understanding of what we're talking about.

5:15 p.m.

Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.

Daniel Verreault

We have, Mr. Hawn.

5:15 p.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Conservative Edmonton Centre, AB

I know you have. I'm not questioning that at all.

5:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Conservative Maxime Bernier

Mr. Boughen.

5:15 p.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Conservative Palliser, SK

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Let me add my voice of welcome to you, gentlemen. I know I speak for my colleagues who are appreciative of the fact that you're giving time and energy to meet with us this afternoon to share your expertise with us.

My question is this. With advanced technology designed into the F135 or F136 engines, is having a second engine as important as it used to be? I'm not sure about aircraft engines, but I kind of look at V8 engines, which used to be predominantly found in cars, and now V6s are the predominant engine. Could you maybe share with us the difference?

5:20 p.m.

Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.

Daniel Verreault

I would be pleased to do so. If I understand your question correctly, you're asking if a single-engine fighter is as safe as a twin-engine fighter.

Of course, when you have two, it's always better than one. However, the manner in which we now understand the technology--the materials, engineering, and the manufacturing of our engines--is clearly demonstrated in both the commercial and military worlds. In the commercial world we used to cross the ocean on four engines. We now do it on two engines. Those engines are more reliable today than the four used to be.

Depending on the weight of the fighter and depending on the amount of thrust you require for this fighter, you of course have a choice. Some aircraft have been designed with two engines: the CF-18 Hornet and Super Hornet. Others have been designed on a single engine. The F-16 is an example.

We have looked at detailed statistics in operation, both in peace-time training and in conflict zones. Today's engines are so reliable that one or two does not make a significant difference. The proof of the pudding is that in the launch of this Joint Strike Fighter program at the outset, all airframe companies deemed that they could now have one engine that would generate 40,000 pounds of thrust, and each independently came with a fighter jet with one engine. Today flying on one engine is within the very much accepted level of risk.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Conservative Palliser, SK

Thank you, Chair.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Conservative Maxime Bernier

Mr. Wilfert, do you want some time?

5:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Liberal Richmond Hill, ON

At the appropriate time, I'd like to raise a point of order.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Conservative Maxime Bernier

Mr. Payne.

October 5th, 2010 / 5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

Thank you, Chair.

I'm not sure how much time I have.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Conservative Maxime Bernier

You still have one minute.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

I'm so happy to have that.

Thank you very much for coming, gentlemen.

First of all, my understanding is that for the F-35 there was a competition between Lockheed Martin and Boeing, and Lockheed Martin won that competition. Is that correct? A short answer, please.

5:20 p.m.

Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.

Daniel Verreault

We are not here to question the airframe competition. This is the government's decision. The customer is always right. Once the customer has made a decision, we move on.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

Okay.

My understanding also is that Israel is not part of the MOU and has always had a very close and unique relationship with the U.S. and the military, and certainly they're dealing with industrial benefits in Israel. Is that correct?

5:20 p.m.

Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.

Daniel Verreault

The terms and conditions have yet to be negotiated, but obviously there are discussions between the Government of Israel and the Government of the United States regarding the F-35, and I would propose that this is a question you must ask of the U.S. government.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

They're not part of the MOU, though, right?

5:20 p.m.

Country Director for Canada , GE Aviation, Military Systems Operation, General Electric Canada Inc.

Daniel Verreault

That is correct. I apologize.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

Do I have any more time left, or is that it?

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Conservative Maxime Bernier

You have 30 seconds.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

I'd like a really short answer. In terms of the benefits that you would see, what about the technology that's available to Canadian companies here? Are they going to be able to use that technology to enhance other opportunities for Canadian companies or throughout the world?

5:20 p.m.

Vice-President, Business Development and Government Affairs, Rolls-Royce

Bruce Lennie

The quick answer is yes. I mentioned in my comments we're working with the National Research Council, which is world class, and they are helping us.

The answer is yes.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Conservative Medicine Hat, AB

All right. I think I'm probably done. Thank you.

5:20 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Conservative Maxime Bernier

Thank you very much.

Mr. Wilfert.