House of Commons Hansard #82 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was native.

Topics

D-Day
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the presence of the right hon. Prime Minister in Normandy for the D-Day ceremony has given Canada and Canadians a reason to reflect on the good deeds our people have accomplished in the world.

As a child living in Italy during the second world war, I was subjected to bombing in a big industrial city and to the absence of my father who had to go to war.

The landing of Canadian troops in Sicily in 1943 is still remembered with great affection by all Sicilians and those Sicilians who immigrated to Canada and live in Vancouver celebrated with me and the military in 1983.

The arrival of the Allies in Italy meant the end of a cruel, senseless war and a return to democracy and freedom to a whole continent and ultimately to the world.

I would like to thank our Prime Minister and our country for remembering with us and for being present at such an important event.

Quebec Federation Of Senior Citizens
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Rocheleau Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, since Tuesday, the city of Trois-Rivières has been the host of some 2,500 people from all parts of Quebec, who are attending the convention of the Quebec Federation of Senior Citizens.

The year 1994 also marks the 25th anniversary of the council of senior citizens from the Mauricie region.

The theme of the convention, "The necessary social involvement of seniors", recognizes not only their past contribution but also their current role and dynamism, in particular through their numerous volunteer activities.

It is not by cutting services to seniors, by closing departmental offices in our regions and by replacing staff with answering machines that this government will provide an adequate response to the needs of these people.

I am proud to salute all convention participants and assure them that the Bloc Quebecois supports their demands, keeping in mind that, above all, the government should show them the greatest respect.

The Late Tom Goode
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Reform

John Cummins Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to recognize Tom Goode. Tom Goode, who served as Delta's mayor for six years and an MP in Pierre Trudeau's Liberal government died last weekend of cancer at the age of 60.

Tom Goode was a fine man, a good friend, a Liberal whose circle of friends and admirers extended far beyond any partisan bounds.

Tom was optimistic about his ability to beat this dreaded disease. As evidence of this, just a few weeks ago he had accepted the position of chair on the Delta North Liberal Party policy committee.

Tom started his political career as a school trustee and was elected as the Liberal MP for Burnaby-Richmond-Delta in 1968. In 1973 he was elected Delta's mayor.

As a politician and a person, Tom was respected for his honesty and integrity. He was a charming man, a delight to be with. He will be missed.

North American Waterfowl Management Plan
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Ian Murray Lanark—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform all members of the House and all Canadians that the signing of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan update took place this morning.

The North American Waterfowl Management Plan, originally signed in 1986, is designed to protect 3.6 million hectares of wetland and upland habitat in Canada. With the signing of this update, Canada has extended its commitment to this conservation program to the year 1999.

Without this form of conservation, wildlife depending on these habitats for survival would continue to decrease in numbers. However, since the implementation of the plan, populations of several species of waterfowl, such as the gadwalls and blue winged teals, have begun to increase.

In the spirit of Environment Week, let us keep in mind that protecting the environment is an ongoing commitment, and that the signing of this plan strengthens the government's commitment in this regard.

Stoney Creek Battle Field Monument
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Tony Valeri Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to share with my colleagues the news that I had the pleasure last weekend of participating in the reopening of the Stoney Creek Battle Field Monument. I would like to extend my sincerest congratulations to the Preserve the Monument Committee and to the community of Stoney Creek for having undertaken this project.

The monument is located on the very site where the Battle of Stoney Creek took place on June 6, 1813. It is particularly fitting that this week, while we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of D-Day, we pause and reflect on the sacrifices made by the Loyalist soldiers in the war of 1812. Some paid the ultimate price but in doing so they helped to ensure that Canada would be born strong and free.

The Stoney Creek Battlefield Monument is a lasting reminder that those who came before us believed that what we now know as Canada was worth dying for. That is their legacy.

The monument is Stoney Creek's legacy to them and it stands as an important symbol that they did not die in vain nor will those sacrifices be forgotten.

National Transportation Week
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Joe Fontana London East, ON

Mr. Speaker, as other members before me have done this week I wish to pay tribute to those involved in the transportation industry in Canada.

The transportation industry is a major contributor to the nation's economy, whatever region of the country you come from. Employment, jobs, salaries, wages and export sales are among the direct benefits.

Transportation serves a variety of functions. It extends Canadian sovereignty over an immense country, it provides links between regions and markets, and connects small remote communities to larger centres.

In the final analysis, transportation today is about moving people and goods efficiently and reliably. The theme of National Transportation Week, as announced by the Minister of Transport, is "Inter-modalism: The perfect fit". This theme and the week's activities complement the regulatory and policy initiatives government and industry are taking to promote smoothly interlocking transportation services.

The government believes that modern, improved, intermodal transportation systems will contribute to the long term economic growth by enabling Canadians to receive supplies and deliver goods to markets quickly and at a competitive cost.

Human Development
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Philippe Paré Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday, the United Nations Development Program published the global report on human development. The Liberals bragged in this House that Canada ranked first for human development, but they forgot to mention Canada's mediocre record in some important areas.

Canadians should be reminded that, according to the report, Canada comes in ninth place with respect to sexual equality, that it has one of the highest unemployment rates, that it treats its native population poorly, that it is one of the most wasteful users of natural resources among OECD countries, and that it shows little concern for the environment.

Instead of trying to score easy political points, the Liberals should analyze the report and look for viable solutions to Canada's major problems.

Main Estimates
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to comment on the debate held on the proposed spending outlined in the 1994-95 main estimates.

Since 1969 Parliament's annual review of the main estimates has resulted in a pathetic total reduction of only one-millionth of one per cent of the proposed expenditures that governments have submitted to Parliament for its approval.

I would hope that my colleagues would reconsider their traditional practice of rubber stamping the government's main estimates. Yesterday the House authorized the government to spend $160.3 billion and will add another $39.7 billion to the national debt, without even considering modest spending reductions.

You would think that when this country is over $500 billion in debt that the government would welcome every opportunity and suggestion to cut its expenditures.

The Constitution
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Harvard Winnipeg—St. James, MB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians spoke clearly last fall that they were fed up with the uncertainty over Canada's Constitution created by the previous

government. They voted for a government that promised to focus on issues that were more vital to them; jobs and economic growth.

Yet on Tuesday of this week the constitutional issue was back in the House, thanks to the leader of the Reform Party. It is a touch of irony that the party that promised to make deficit reduction its top priority and swore not to talk about the Constitution, should be the perpetrator of such a divisive debate.

This apparent contradiction may be one reason why the Reform Party's popularity has dropped right across the country, especially in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

The opposition has tried to derail the nation's business by setting a constitutional trap. We will not be fooled. We will stick to our plan. Canadians can be sure that we do not intend to fall off the track.

[Translation]

Right To Self-Determination
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Ted McWhinney Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, after my June 7 speech on national unity, the hon. member for Laurier-Sainte-Marie asked me a question on sovereignty and the right to self-determination.

Present-day international law recognizes the right to self-determination only for peoples. Nothing requires self-determination to occur through the break-up of an existing multinational state. This right can be exercised by staying within a pluralistic federal state like ours. In a political and non-legal sense, both Quebec francophones and Native Canadians can qualify as nations.

Results Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, malnutrition affects one in three children in the developing world. Clean water is not available to over 1.2 billion people and basic education and primary health care is considered an inaccessible luxury to many in the world today.

Results Canada is an organization devoted to creating the political will for the sustainable end to hunger and poverty. Basic human needs such as literacy, immunization and clean water should be available to every person on earth.

Results Canada encourages the promotion of economic self-reliance. Through the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh small loans are issued to the most destitute rural people and over half have managed to get themselves out of poverty.

The success of this program has led to the establishment of the Grameen Trust, a fund set aside for the development of similar loan programs in third world countries.

To all of the staff and volunteers at Results Canada, I commend you for a job well done.

Quebec Sovereignty
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Gaston Leroux Richmond—Wolfe, QC

Mr. Speaker, on his own initiative, the hon. member for Glengarry-Prescott-Russell and Deputy Government Whip circulated a petition to silence the Official Opposition. That petition, which more or less sought to censure discussions in this House, must be strongly denounced as being fundamentally undemocratic.

Let us not forget that close to two million Quebec voters democratically expressed their support for our option, an option which we never tried to hide from the public, and that it is not only our right but our duty to talk about sovereignty for Quebec.

Mr. Speaker, we will continue to talk about sovereignty, in compliance with the democratic mandate which we received last October 25 from Quebecers, who gave us more than two-thirds of the province's seats and made us the Official Opposition. We now have confirmation of the intolerance and pettiness of the member for Glengarry-Prescott-Russell and the Liberals.

The Family
Statements By Members

June 9th, 1994 / 2:10 p.m.

Reform

Sharon Hayes Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians have made it clear that one of their greatest concerns is the family and the need to strengthen and encourage this important cornerstone of our society. What Canadians need is someone to champion their cause.

The Reform Party caucus has taken on that mandate. The Reform's task force on the family will seek to strengthen the status and the well-being of the family by providing leadership on important issues and by challenging policy trends and legislation that harm and interfere with the role of the family.

The purpose of the task force will be to protect Canadian families from inappropriate government control and interference. The task force reaffirms the family is the fundamental unit of our society. The family is the foundation of our social and

economic structure. It provides a place to nurture our children. It provides for the communication of beliefs, convictions and values.

Reform will ensure that even under the present Liberal agenda this does not change.

Regional Development
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bonaventure—Îles-De-La-Madeleine
Québec

Liberal

Patrick Gagnon Parliamentary Secretary to Solicitor General

Mr. Speaker, I want to take this opportunity to announce the most recent initiatives of the federal government in Eastern Quebec.

A few days ago, the Canadian and Quebec governments unveiled six projects totalling $2.7 billion. Moreover, this morning I announced that a project worth more than half a million dollars would be implemented in my riding.

Last June 2, the hon. member for Rimouski-Témiscouata made the following statement in the House regarding the Federal Office of Regional Development:

When I am told that there are only $2 million left for the Lower St. Lawrence, the Gaspé Peninsula and the Magdalen Islands, I say that the cupboard is bare.

In the last week, $3.2 million were invested in Eastern Quebec. The hon. member for Rimouski-Témiscouata should be more objective in her comments. It is no surprise that her party, her leader and her option are losing popularity in Quebec. It is time for the opposition to stop making slanderous statements.

National Unity
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Harold Culbert Carleton—Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, this past week there were many celebrations honouring the 50th anniversary of D-Day and those who sacrificed so greatly so that Canadians might enjoy the freedoms we do today.

However, on Tuesday of this week there was a debate in the House on the issue of Canadian unity, a debate which by its very essence questioned the future of Canada.

In its report covering over 100 countries, the United Nations concluded that Canada is the best country in the world in which to live.

We can share our differences in colour, our differences in religion, our differences in language and our differences in culture and still share the dream that so many Canadians fought and died for, a strong, united Canada where dreams are made into realities.

Long live Canada for all Canadians.