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House of Commons Hansard #203 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was milk.

Topics

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy LiberalMinister of Human Resources Development and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, I point out to the hon. member and members of the House that as part of our reform program we are presently engaged in a major reinvention of the way the department provides delivery of services. It is our expectation that by this time next year we will have substantially expanded the level

of service to rural areas by providing more delivery points at areas where they have major responsibilities.

In terms of the special activities under the agricultural employment service, we are prepared to sit down with the agricultural community, the Canadian Federation of Labour and the horticultural society to work out ways to have direct partnerships with the agricultural community in the rural areas and to both have a facility in which we share in the opportunities that the centres can offer for jobs and employment. That is part of the new partnerships we are trying to establish in reorganizing the department.

Public ServiceOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Réjean Lefebvre Bloc Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister responsible for Public Service Renewal.

In its budget, the federal government announced that the public service would be reduced by 45,000 positions over three years, including more than 12,000 in the Ottawa-Hull area. The Minister responsible for Public Service Renewal seems to be unable to give specifics about the extent of these cuts, stating that it should be a rather large number, but that he does not know the exact number because it varies from department to department and from day to day.

Are we to understand from what the Minister responsible for Public Service Renewal said that the decision to eliminate 45,000 public service positions was an impromptu, last minute kind of decision?

Public ServiceOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé LiberalPresident of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member from the opposition knew anything about public administration, he would know that, when plans are made that affect departmental administration, it is clear that each department will come up with a different plan and that surplus notices will be sent out on the basis of evolving needs.

It is therefore impossible for any department to indicate today what it has done because, obviously, its plans are implemented on a day by day, week by week basis, and the answer that was provided is correct.

What is important to know is that we are going ahead with our plans to streamline the public service; we are in the process of implementing the measures announced in the budget with efficiency and competence.

Public ServiceOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Réjean Lefebvre Bloc Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, if, as the minister claims, this was not an impromptu decision, does he undertake to release the department by department program evaluation report, which resulted in the decision to lay off 45,000 public servants, and to tell us how the work force adjustment program will be carried out?

Public ServiceOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé LiberalPresident of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada

Mr. Speaker, the budget tabled before this House clearly spells out the government's fiscal plan and its impact on each department.

The government had the courage to make the decisions required. Unfortunately, this means that certain positions will have to be eliminated. We acted in a humane way, providing programs such as early retirement or buyout packages and, so far, the unions feel that the budget is being implemented appropriately and efficiently, in an effort to accommodate the public service.

Criminal CodeOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Sharon Hayes Reform Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, recently an American tourist was acquitted of assault for spanking his five-year old daughter. Every parent in Canada was on trial.

Last June the minister stated that the government was reviewing section 43 of the Criminal Code. This section permits parents and educators to physically discipline their children using reasonable force. The minister also stated: "I know of no plan at present to propose a change to this section".

My question is for the justice minister. Will the minister state today the outcome of the government's review of section 43, and regardless of that outcome will he reaffirm his support for section 43?

Criminal CodeOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am satisfied the section in the Criminal Code complies with our obligations. I can tell the hon. member and the House that the government has no intention to introduce any change to section 43 of the Criminal Code.

Criminal CodeOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Sharon Hayes Reform Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have a supplementary question. If the minister has no intention of changing section 43, why in the world is his government continuing to fund the Children's Bureau review of section 43?

Criminal CodeOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I made clear in my response to the question when it was last put, because we are signatories to international conventions and treaties we are

obligated like other civilized countries to do an audit of our laws to ensure they reflect the values and the principles to which we subscribe with other nations.

The work to which the hon. member has referred is simply part of that effort and it must be done.

FinanceOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Nelson Riis NDP Kamloops, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance who will know from press reports today that his present seatmate has said: "Cash means clout. No cash, no clout". He went on to point out that the majority of members of the finance committee agree it is important for Ottawa to maintain the cash transfer to make sure the federal government maintains its influence, meaning the ability to enforce legislation like the Canada Health Act.

Will the Minister of Finance agree with his seatmate that the idea bears merit and that he will consider it in terms of changing the legislation presently before the House?

FinanceOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin LiberalMinister of Finance and Minister responsible for the Federal Office of Regional Development -Quebec

Mr. Speaker, I certainly would like my colleague to answer the question and my colleague would like to answer it.

We are delighted as a result of the reform of House of Commons committee rules that we have a very active, dynamic and incisive finance committee of the House.

As to the particular comments of the chairman of the committee, as the hon. member for Kamloops knows, we will be sitting down with the provinces, and quite clearly we do not want to do anything premature in terms of those discussions with the provinces. It is very important for us to hear from the provincial finance ministers on this issue.

Gun ControlOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Liberal Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday morning the justice committee heard moving testimony from Burlington resident Priscilla de Villiers on gun control. In no uncertain terms, Mrs. de Villiers stated: "Let me tell you about inconvenience. The death of your children at the hands of a man wielding a gun is an inconvenience."

I ask the Minister of Justice if he feels the proposed gun registry contained in Bill C-68 will inconvenience Canadian gun owners.

Gun ControlOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think it is telling that the question of the day did not come from the other side of the House, because the witnesses yesterday were victims of violence with firearms and they were not in a position that could be exploited by the Reform.

The very purpose of Bill C-68 is to address the kinds of tragedies the committee heard about yesterday. The point is perhaps best made by comparing on the one hand the inconvenience of filling out a form and mailing it in with $10 over the next five years and on the other hand losing a member of your family.

I am often asked for proof that registration of firearms will achieve something for Canada. For those who ask for proof, I suggest they speak to the parents, the mother who yesterday described the tragedy of losing a child, speak to the children whose mother is dead because she was shot in her home.

This government with this bill stands with the Victims of Violence for Change. This government stands with the police chiefs and the police across this country. We shall not fail them.

Gun ControlOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Gun ControlOral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

This concludes the question period.

I have a point of order from the hon. member for Kindersley-Lloydminster.

Points Of OrderOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Reform

Elwin Hermanson Reform Kindersley—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw to the attention of the House that during this last question in question period, the question concerned specific matters that happened in committee. My understanding of the rules under the standing orders is that is not a proper question for question period. I would ask you to rule on this issue, Mr. Speaker.

Points Of OrderOral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member is correct in stating that we cannot ask questions in the House that directly relate to a committee. In my interpretation of the question, it would seem to me that at the time I heard it, it seemed to be general enough.

I will take the hon. member's request under advisement. I will review the blues, and if necessary I will come back to the House.

Government Response To PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

May 17th, 1995 / 3 p.m.

Kingston and the Islands Ontario

Liberal

Peter Milliken LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to seven petitions.

Interparliamentary DelegationsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Liberal Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34, I have the honour to present to the House the report on the joint parliamentary delegation visit to Brazil on April 15 to April 21, 1995, in both official languages.

Committees Of The HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bill Graham Liberal Rosedale, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade relating to the reform of international financial institutions for the agenda of the G-7 summit in Halifax.

The report makes 20 recommendations aimed at strengthening Canada's position heading into the G-7 economic summit in Halifax in June. It is a unanimous report of the committee.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee is asking for the government's response to the report.

Committees Of The HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Reform

Elwin Hermanson Reform Kindersley—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. There has been some quick consultation here. I believe there might be unanimous consent to allow my colleague from Wild Rose to introduce a private member's bill today without the usual 48 hours notice, since he is not available to be in the House on Thursday and Friday. I would ask the House to give him consent to introduce his bill today.

Committees Of The HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

I am informed that we have to have the bill. Does the member have the bill with him? We have the bill. Is there unanimous consent?

Committees Of The HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Criminal CodeRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Reform Wild Rose, AB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-327, an act to amend the Criminal Code (bail in cases of assault with weapon or criminal harassment).

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleagues for giving me the opportunity to present this private member's bill.

The bill is an act that would amend the Criminal Code regarding bail in the case of assault with a weapon or criminal harassment. There have been a number of cases throughout the nation where people have been released on bail who have committed some very serious violent crimes and have followed through on their threats after bail has been issued. This bill would be an attempt to assist the victims so they would not be vulnerable in the future.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Committees Of The HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Kingston and the Islands Ontario

Liberal

Peter Milliken LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I think you might find unanimous consent that the House adopt the motion standing in my name on today's Order Paper, No. 17, that the 77th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be concurred in.

This important report deals with the form of the Journals in respect to supply proceedings in the House and in the other place. I think there will be consent to adopt the motion without debate this afternoon.