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House of Commons Hansard #35 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was devco.

Topics

Saguenay—St. Lawrence Marine Park ActGovernment Orders

10:50 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell LiberalSecretary of State (Parks)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to move a technical amendment. Essentially we are making sure that both the French and the English versions are consistent. I move:

That Bill C-7, in the preamble, be amended by replacing, in the French version, line 6 on page 1 with the following:

“flore, ainsi que les ressources naturelles exceptionnel ”

Saguenay—St. Lawrence Marine Park ActGovernment Orders

10:50 a.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Bloc Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to address this bill at report stage. We will support the amendment.

Establishing the Saguenay—St. Lawrence marine park is an idea that originated in the Saguenay area. Its purpose is to give heritage status to one of Quebec's most spectacular regions—the whole Saguenay River—while also promoting tourism.

The consultation process which then took place resulted in the project being expanded to include the St. Lawrence. Those who worked on this initiative deserve to be congratulated. A major consultation process was properly conducted before the project went ahead. Several years went by between the time the idea first came up, in the early nineties, and the time when the House finally votes on the legislation.

The bill includes new and interesting points which had not been raised before and which do not all reflect ideas put forward by those behind the project. It should also be noted that the then federal environment minister, who is now the premier of Quebec, had managed to get the federal government to be receptive to the idea, which has since followed its course.

Let us not forget that the park will be jointly managed by the federal and provincial governments, through a committee on which both will be represented. For the first time, Quebec will maintain ownership of the seabed.

In the sixties and seventies, there were epic battles concerning Forillon national park, among others, where the issue of ownership generated problems. In the case of the Saguenay—St. Lawrence marine park, the two levels of government have come to an agreement whereby Quebec will maintain ownership of the seabed. This is a good step and a good result.

As a member of Parliament, I took part in the consultation process and a great of representations had to be made.

The final form this is taking allows our tourist industry on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River to have critical points of contact with the park through—and we make no secret of this—the special efforts made by firms like Duvetnord, which have turned the river into a major tourist area worthy of preservation.

I think there are significant elements in the whole Lower St. Lawrence region, from Trois-Pistoles to Île aux Basques, which incidentally is one the far extremities that will not be directly included in the park but could be considered as part of a whole system. I think that, in the future, we should take advantage of the fact that the federal government has not yet met its targets for the year 2000 and may have a hard time meeting them as far as marine areas are concerned. Perhaps thought should be given to finding a way to include the south shore even more, somehow.

However, I feel it is important to understand that the amendment be positive. It is also important to know that consultations were conducted properly and that, in the end, we will have a park that, in my estimation, stands to become a world renowned tourist attraction at a time when adventure tourism is so popular. We will have everything we need to let the world know about this outstanding region to attract tourists from abroad. I think that the Saguenay—St. Lawrence marine park will be a fantastic tourist attraction.

What is interesting about this legislation is that, if passed, it will make it possible to develop the necessary infrastructures and for centres on both sides of the St. Lawrence River and the Saguenay River to have a really significant tourist accommodation capacity. For the Lower St. Lawrence region at least, this will help give it a stronger position as a tourist region. In that sense, this is very desirable.

Before I conclude I would like to remind the federal government that it is essential to have a logical plan of action. If on the one hand, a Saguenay—St. Lawrence marine park is established but, on the other hand, no effort is made to implement sufficiently stringent environmental standards regarding, for instance, greenhouse gases and everything having to do with climate, as beautiful as the marine park may look, if there is not a drop of water left in the St. Lawrence and an environmental disaster is caused, the result will not be very satisfactory.

So, we should promote an equally open attitude at the international level and take on an advocacy and a leadership role in promoting strict and stringent environmental rules to ensure that our part of North America is at the forefront and can provide this product. There is nothing worse in the tourist industry than to offer a product that loses its appeal. When a park like this one is established, it should be for 10, 20, 30, 50 or even 100 years, and that is what we are trying to negotiate. That is what will be happening in Kyoto for instance and in the ongoing negotiation process regarding environmental rules. This has to be the basis for the federal government's position.

I will conclude by saying that establishing this park is a good thing, it is the result of an innovative approach that leaves the ownership of the seabed to Quebec, it was made possible by the participation of the people of the Saguenay and was spearheaded by a person who believed that joint management from a position of equality was possible in Canada. Having Quebec and Canada deal on an equal footing can give interesting results and today we have this bill to prove it.

Hooray for the establishment of the Saguenay—St. Lawrence marine park. Let us now look at adding to Canada's marine areas as well as setting a goal for the year 2000, and I am sure you will find on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River all the support necessary to add to this beautiful new park.

Saguenay—St. Lawrence Marine Park ActGovernment Orders

10:55 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

It is time for Statements by Members, but I am almost hesitant on such a positive note to cut off debate. However, we will proceed to Statements by Members.

ScoutingStatements By Members

10:55 a.m.

Reform

Dick Harris Reform Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, this morning the governor general and the chief scout of Canada conferred scouting's highest awards on 20 members of the scout family of Canada.

I know my colleagues on both sides of the House will join me in congratulating the recipients of these awards. As the member of Prince George—Bulkley Valley I want to pay special tribute to my constituent Tyler Douglas Edward Mauro, age 11, who was awarded the Jack Cornwell decoration.

This award is given to individuals who have undergone great suffering in a heroic manner. Well done, Tyler. You have shown great courage and determination in the face of physical challenges. You have truly lived up to the Scout promise and the Scout law.

Ronald McDonald HouseStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Liberal Carleton—Gloucester, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week I had the honour of hosting the visit of presidents and managers for Ronald McDonald homes across Canada as they met in Ottawa. I also had the pleasure of welcoming them in the House of Commons.

Canadians are thankful for such an organization which provides a home away from home to families of children being treated in hospital for cancer and other life threatening illnesses.

These establishments make it possible for seriously ill children to have their families with them at a critical time in their lives. Staying in a Ronald McDonald House also gives families an opportunity to talk with other parents going through similar experiences.

I extend heartfelt thanks to all volunteers, employees and managers of Ronald McDonald Houses in Canada. Your compassion and devotion are a big help in times of trouble.

Matapédia RcmStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Bloc Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, over 250 people from the Matapédia RCM got together at a forum on economic recovery and job creation.

I wish to congratulate Claude Jacques, the forum's president, for targeting economic problems and encouraging 13 workshop leaders to present concrete solutions to job creation.

In the Matapédia RCM, gloom is giving way to action.

The residents of the Matapédia valley have decided to rely on ingenuity, inventiveness and steadfast solidarity.

Many young entrepreneurs are urging us to focus on the year 2000, on new challenges. The future belongs to the bold.

The people of the Matapédia valley are taking the challenge.

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Liberal Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, global warming is a problem that every person, every country and every level of government in the world must deal with.

I rise in the House today to tell of a success story. Toronto's outstanding progress in reducing greenhouse emissions is a model for the world and something that the House should be aware of.

According to the UN affiliated International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives, metropolitan Toronto is the world's leader in fighting global warming. It tops the list of 150 cities in cutting carbon dioxide output between 1990 and 1996.

Toronto and its surrounding suburbs achieved cumulative reductions of 7.8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide between 1990 and 1996. That is a 6% cent reduction.

The reductions were achieved using a variety of measures including landfill gas recovery, recycling initiatives, energy efficient street and land lighting and community water conservation programs.

This experience should serve as model for other cities in Canada and the rest of the world, showing that we can cut harmful greenhouse gas emissions, save money and create jobs—

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

11 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Abitibi.

StornowayStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Liberal Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is an article today in the Ottawa Citizen by Bruce Ward announcing that the Reform Party has sent out invitations to a posh open house at Stornoway between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m., on November 30, 1997.

The great bingo caller at Stornoway invites the people of Ottawa to 541 Acacia Avenue. For reservations, dial 996-6740.

Come see the new drapes, the new paint job, the new wallpaper and the fine linen imported directly from China. Come see the new bingo reform.

AirportsStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Reform

Jay Hill Reform Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government is downloading small regional airports throughout the country. Two airports have already been turned over in my riding and now a third is on the federal hit list.

Some of the biggest users of the Fort Nelson airport are the federal and provincial governments, forestry workers, water bombers and American tourists on their way to Alaska.

Fort Nelson is in the northeast corner of B.C. next to the Yukon border and hundreds of kilometres from any other towns. The people of Fort Nelson are going to referendum December 6 to vote on whether they can afford to take over the local airport. The population is only 4,500, a small town with a big heart. Yet the federal government wants the town to pick up the tab for an airport that runs a $400,000 annual deficit.

Why is Fort Nelson being forced to assume the cost of operating its airport but other northern communities like Whitehorse, Watson Lake and Yellowknife are not?

Wye Marsh Wildlife CentreStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Paul Devillers Liberal Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to take this opportunity to pay tribute to Mr. Bob Whittam, retired executive director of the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre. The Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre located in my riding is a non-profit organization committed to promoting an understanding of the vital role wetlands play within the environment.

Mr. Whittam, affectionately known as Mr. Wye Marsh, was recently honoured at a banquet attended by more than 300 family, friends and dignitaries. He has been the driving force behind the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre through good and bad times. Were it not for Mr. Whittam's leadership, it is quite doubtful that the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre would have survived a cut in federal funding in 1984.

I again thank Bob Whittam on behalf of all citizens of Simcoe North for his tireless dedication and commitment in contributing to the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre's success. Have a good retirement, Bob.

Youth EmploymentStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Liberal Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to announce that tomorrow, November 22, the Minister of Industry will be opening in Ottawa West—Nepean the first youth employment info fair at Algonquin College. All day young people will be able to see displays by government departments, non-governmental agencies and post-secondary institutions. Even one of our own pages, Mr. Craig O'Brien, will help us out by talking about the pages program.

I hope young people will take the opportunity to turn out so they can find out what government, the community and business are doing to improve their chances of getting a good job. They can see what we are doing to improve their opportunities for post-secondary education and get the information they need to create a better future for themselves.

ApecStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Grant McNally Reform Dewdney—Alouette, BC

Mr. Speaker, I wish to inform the House of an APEC success story in my own riding. On Wednesday, November 26 officials from Dongcheng district of Beijing City in China together with Maple Ridge entrepreneur Bill Stelmaschuk will sign an agreement to open a reciprocal trade office between the city of Maple Ridge in my riding and Dongcheng.

These offices will be the headquarters of China International Investment Ltd. of North America, a partnership between government and the private sector. It will open up multimillion dollar investment opportunities for Canadian and Chinese entrepreneurs. Initial joint ventures include the construction of an indoor family entertainment complex, shipping container sales and leasing, computer sales and vehicle and heavy leasing equipment.

I ask the House to join me in congratulating Bill Stelmaschuk and the people of Dongcheng for demonstrating through their actions that the entrepreneurial spirit is indeed alive and well in Canada.

VeteransStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Liberal Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is no coincidence that the interest for Remembrance Day is increasing everywhere in Canada and that there are more and more people at the ceremonies.

It must be pointed out that Veterans Affairs Canada has decided to go modern and has developed an excellent web site. The number of hits this year increased by 238%.

During a two-week period, 23,000 Canadians had more than a million hits on the Veterans Affairs Canada web site and accessed various items such as the Books of Remembrance and Veterans Remember , a collection of stories and radio interviews with veterans. This site seeks to promote young Canadians' interest in our country's military history.

Furthermore, last Tuesday, young people hired by STEM-Net in Newfoundland and Labrador launched a new digital series by SchoolNet on Canada at war.

It is most fitting that the House acknowledge all Canadians, young and old, who continue to help us pay tribute to Canada's veterans and recognize their achievements and sacrifices.

Aboriginal YouthStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Gordon Earle NDP Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, the historic systematic abuse of aboriginal youth by residential schools goes unanswered by this government. An apology is due.

It appears that lawyers run the department, as this Liberal government has yet to say two simple words: “we're sorry”.

Every day this government remains content to allow the full weight of this horror to burn in the minds and hearts of the countless victims is another day this government shares responsibility for this acts of ritualized abuse.

Aboriginal youth were torn from their families and communities. Their language, culture, customs and values were suppressed. The wounds of this abuse are still open and now is the time for healing.

The royal commission clearly states that recognizing our mistake is the first step toward a new relationship based on mutual respect. An apology from this government would be one small remedy that would begin the healing. Anything less is unconscionable, unforgivable and unacceptable.

Royal Commission On Aboriginal PeoplesStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Liberal Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, today marks the first anniversary of the release of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples report. The report recommended several actions the government should take in addressing the concerns of many aboriginal communities.

I am pleased that the federal government will respond to this report in the new year and equally pleased to be on the committee that will look at the government's response.

There is no doubt that the work of the commission will influence aboriginal policy and I thank all those who participated in preparing this report for their valuable work.

Quebec EconomyStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Bloc Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, where have all the scarecrows gone?

Until last May, the members opposite were constantly making inflammatory statements on the economic consequences of political uncertainty in Quebec. This fall, however, our scarecrows have stayed out of sight, strangely enough. It is true that there is a lot of good news.

With the socioeconomic summit launched by Premier Bouchard, there is a tremendous rise in new investments all over Quebec. It is said that economic growth will be greater than in France, Germany, the United States, Italy and Japan.

In spite of the economic disaster handed down by the provincial Liberals and of enormous federal cuts, the Parti Quebecois government is continuing to put Quebec's economy and finances back on track. This has sent our economic scarecrows into hiding.

Could it be that they have decided to do like the birds and fly South? If that is the case, good for them, they can stay there. We wish them a good holiday.

JusticeStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Progressive Conservative Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, this is restorative justice week. True justice makes things right rather than lamenting what is wrong. True justice cultivates strength rather than perpetuating failure. I believe restorative justice could be a great part of the solution for our justice system in Canada.

Restorative justice views crime as a violation of the victim in the community, not solely a violation of the state. As a result, the offender becomes accountable to the victim and the community.

Under our existing justice system, offenders seldom are required to realize the harm they have caused. Restorative justice confronts the perpetrators with the personal harm they have caused and requires them to pay reparation and make real amends to victims and the community.

Restorative justice offers victims the opportunity to regain personal powers and allows them the time to become more involved with the justice system. It also gives them the power that was taken away when the crime was committed.

In one word, restorative justice puts victims at the centre of the justice system where they should always have been.

Restorative justice should be studied by this House as an alternative to the current way of thinking about crime and criminal justice in Canada.

Integrated Manufacturing Technologies InstituteStatements By Members

November 21st, 1997 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes Liberal London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Industry recently celebrated the opening of the National Research Council's newest research facility, the Integrated Manufacturing Technologies Institute. This institute will eventually house 140 scientists, engineers, technicians and support staff and will further enhance London, Ontario's reputation as a leading centre of research and development in Canada.

Research programs at IMTI will be aimed at keeping Canadian manufacturers at the forefront of technological innovation and advances needed in our highly competitive global economy. These programs will continue to position Canada as a world leader in our future knowledge based areas of concern.

I congratulate the NRC on over 80 years of improving the lives of Canadians by performing and supporting relevant research and development. I also applaud the diverse team of stakeholders from the University of Western Ontario, industry, levels of government and the local business community in attracting this high valued added institute to our city.

Congratulations. Félicitations.

PeacekeepingStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Rose-Marie Ur Liberal Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada is enormously proud of its international contribution to peacekeeping and peacebuilding. Today 15 police officers from several forces are leaving on a peacekeeping mission to Bosnia. The officers are from the RCMP, Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Police, Waterloo Regional Police, Durham Regional Police and the Ontario Provincial Police.

On behalf of all Canadians, I would like to wish these officers well on their journey. The officers leaving today will replace a contingent of 15 other officers who will be returning to Canada from Bosnia in a few days. We are grateful that the officers returning have safely accomplished their mission. They can be proud of their work with the United Nations.

I would like to officially recognize the humanitarian efforts of these officers who have worked hard to restore peace and order in Bosnia, with a respect for internationally recognized human rights and fundamental freedoms.

We know we can count on the professionalism of these Canadian police officers to continue to serve the UN well and support responsible police forces in Bosnia.

Canada PostOral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Reform Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, it used to be said that nothing could stop the mail, neither rain nor snow, nor sleet nor hail, but this Liberal government has stopped the mail. This minister will not take a stand and the postal strike is paralyzing the country at the absolute worst time of year. Canadians want to get out their holiday parcels. It is the busiest time of the year for many businesses and charities are suffering because the mail is not moving.

How many more days, how many more weeks or how many more months is this government willing to allow this strike to paralyze our country?

Canada PostOral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalMinister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I am amazed that a party that indicates it wants less government now wants government to get involved and interfere in the collective bargaining process.

I ask the opposition party to let the collective bargaining system work for Canadians and have no government interference.

Canada PostOral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Reform Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, this government has this unflagging trust in this collective bargaining process, the process which has brought our post office four strikes in ten years and has not brought a resolution to this current dispute for seven months. Why not let them bargain while the mail is still being delivered or is the Canadian government going to hold Canadians hostage right through Christmas?

Canada PostOral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalMinister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I am amazed that the opposition, a party that wants less government, wants government to move in right away and interfere with the collective bargaining process.

Let the system work. Let both parties do what they are doing, sit down and come up with an agreement.

Canada PostOral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Reform Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, charities are being hurt the worst. Take, for example, the Old Brewery Mission in Montreal, a homeless shelter. It has had a $700,000 mail campaign for fund-raising stopped dead in its tracks by this strike. They are facing debt and they are struggling to pay for the 1,200 meals that they deliver to the homeless each day. This charity and the homeless that depend on it are paying the price for this government's inaction.

How many such causes is this Liberal government ready to sacrifice while it keeps making these lame excuses?