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House of Commons Hansard #11 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was treaty.

Topics

National ParksStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre De Savoye Bloc Portneuf, QC

Mr. Speaker, just recently, we learned that national parks, which come under the authority of the federal government, are in terrible shape. Parks Canada is standing by and watching the sad spectacle of many species of wildlife disappearing into oblivion.

The problem is generalized, and not limited to one or two parks. This is a real crisis. One expert is not hesitating to blame Parks Canada for the disaster.

And yet, the government has tabled a bill to create marine conservation areas, for which Parks Canada would have responsibility.

How can the government think about adding to the responsibilities of an agency that has obviously shown itself unable to handle its existing mandate properly?

Parks Canada must first halt the disappearance of threatened species in existing national parks before the government can think—

National ParksStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Edmonton—Strathcona.

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Rahim Jaffer Reform Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the environment minister may be proud of his green thumb but it is his iron fist that Canadians are worried about.

After his ridiculous statements about the special tax on sport utility vehicles, the minister is now worried about emissions from cows and pigs. That is right. Just when we thought the junk science on global warming could not get any more weird, it just has. Now the ranchers and farmers who raise our tasty four-legged friends are the new environmental villains.

This brings a completely new dimension to the Liberal gas tax proposal. Will the minister introduce an anti-flatulence tax, a dollar for every animal that passes wind?

If the minister is concerned about the global warming myth, I have some advice. Tell his Liberal caucus not to exhale.

Maurice RichardStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Liberal Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, last night in Montreal a special event took place.

Yesterday evening, we paid tribute to a hero of Ahuntsic, of Montreal, and of the entire hockey world, Maurice Richard.

Maurice Richard is an example of tenacity, of hard work, and of hockey professionalism. He is also a hero for people such as my brother and all the young people of his generation, but it transcends generations.

In short, he is a model on the ice and off it as well.

I say thank you to Maurice Richard for being a role model for all young people in the country, and for also assuring that our national sport, hockey, continues to be honoured in the same way and to be reflective of the type of team and sport spirit we want in the country.

Congratulations, Maurice, and thanks.

DiwaliStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Liberal Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, today on Parliament Hill the south Asian community is celebrating Diwali, the festival of lights.

Diwali signifies victory of light over darkness, victory of knowledge over ignorance, victory of goodness over evil and victory of life over death. It is a celebration of eternal light.

Diwali is a national festival celebrated by a large segment of the south Asian community around the world.

Today I would like to thank the Prime Minister, ministers and MPs who have already confirmed their presence at this evening's celebration of this great event by the members of the Indo-Canadian community in room 237-C between 4.30 p.m. and 6 p.m.

National Hockey LeagueStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

John Solomon NDP Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, SK

Mr. Speaker, the NHL and the players will not do anything to keep pro hockey in Canada. If they are not prepared to co-operate, then the federal taxpayer should not either.

For the government to even consider for one minute spending one more dime of tax revenues to bail out the NHL would be a monumental travesty of justice when thousands of farmers are going bankrupt in the worst farm crisis since the depression. If the government helps millionaire hockey players and owners out of a currency imbalance but will not help farmers out of an international subsidy war, then something is terribly wrong in our country.

To put additional tax dollars into pro sports before food, health, education, housing or yes, even some tax relief, would push Canadian priorities so far out of balance that voters would never forgive the Liberals' stupidity.

The government's own polls say tax aid for pro hockey is the lowest spending priority for Canadians. Some 94% in my own riding survey opposed subsidizing the NHL more than the millions we already provide to it. One fellow said it best: “Farm aid, yes; hockey aid, no”.

Transportation Of Nuclear WasteStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Maurice Godin Bloc Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, a few days ago, I received in my riding office a copy of the resolutions of the cities of Delson, Saint-Constant and Châteauguay addressed to the Prime Minister of Canada on the subject of the transportation of nuclear waste from Russia and the United States via the St. Lawrence seaway.

In my riding, some 100,000 people live along the St. Lawrence in the municipalities of Delson, Sainte-Catherine, Saint-Constant, Kahnawake, Châteauguay, Mercier and Léry and are very concerned about the possibility of environmental accidents. In addition, these cities draw their drinking water near or from the St. Lawrence.

This government, which is spending millions on consultations with the public in certain areas would be well advised to put an end to its silence—at no cost to itself—acknowledge receipt of these resolutions and put a stop to this project that represents a danger to the people living on the shores of the St. Lawrence.

Irving OilStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

John Herron Progressive Conservative Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, recently New Brunswick's Irving Oil set a higher standard for all fuel manufacturers in Canada by introducing a new brand of low sulphur gasoline for Canadian consumers.

As a New Brunswick MP and the environment critic for the PC Party, I am proud that New Brunswick's own Irving Oil is the first to meet Environment Canada's new target levels of 150 parts per million three years ahead of schedule.

This healthy investment also indicates that Irving Oil will likely meet its commitment to Environment Canada's next target level of sulphur reduction to 30 parts per million well ahead of the scheduled deadline in 2005.

Elderly people and individuals suffering from heart or lung disease are particularly sensitive to air pollution. This clean air initiative will go a long way in the battle to help all Canadians breathe a little easier.

Congratulations to Irving Oil for its foresight and conviction. Canadians are grateful for its commitment to the environment and human health.

Women's History MonthStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Liberal Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, for the eighth year in a row, Canadians are celebrating Women's History Month in October.

October was chosen to commemorate the historical importance of the Persons Case. On October 18, 1929, following a long political and legal fight by a group of five women, the British privy council made a decision declaring that the term “persons” in section 24 of the British North America Act also included members of the female sex and that therefore women were eligible for Senate appointment.

In this Year of La Francophonie, the theme of Women's History Month is “Yesterday and Today: Francophone women in Canada”.

Nearly 7 million people live in French in Canada, and more than half of them are women. I am proud that the federal government is paying special homage to francophone women throughout the country for their exceptional contribution to the evolution of Canadian society.

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

October 26th, 1999 / 2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning ReformLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has repeatedly said he was not personally involved in the security arrangements for the APEC conference. Now there is concrete evidence before the RCMP complaints inquiry quoting RCMP Superintendent Wayne May as saying “The Prime Minister of our country is directly involved”. Yesterday the Prime Minister's human shield, the Deputy Prime Minister, was completely unable to answer this contradiction.

Why is the Prime Minister's story in direct contradiction to evidence presented to the RCMP complaints inquiry?

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the inquiry has been going on for more than a year. There have been thousands of pages of documents and a lot of witnesses. The inquiry is ongoing. Let the inquiry do its job. It is as simple as that.

There cannot be two inquiries, one in the House of Commons and the one that is now taking place. I have confidence that Mr. Justice Hughes will look at all the facts and report to the public.

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning ReformLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the inquiry is doing its job and one of the things it turned up was this evidence from RCMP Superintendent Wayne May, who said, and I will quote again, “The Prime Minister of our country is directly involved”. Superintendent May had no reason to make up that statement.

Is the Prime Minister saying that Superintendent May is the one who is lying?

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, Mr. May was a witness. If they want to call him back it is for them to decide.

I know exactly what I said yesterday, and I repeat, let the commission do its work. I repeat, and the evidence is there, that I never gave any instructions and never discussed anything on security with anybody with the RCMP.

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning ReformLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Prime Minister cannot explain why he chose to put the protection of the image of a foreign dictator ahead of the rights of Canadian students, so we are not asking that question.

We are asking a simpler question, to explain the contradiction between the Prime Minister's story and evidence that has been presented to this inquiry. We are not getting any answers there either, so perhaps a change of venue would help.

The Prime Minister says that he has all of this faith in the RCMP complaints inquiry. If he is so sure of his story, will he repeat it under oath in front of that inquiry?

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, when a member of parliament, when a minister and when a prime minister is in the House of Commons talking to the people of Canada, all the electorate of Canada, it is as good as having the Bible here.

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Reform Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am repeating the Prime Minister to himself: “I am telling you I never talked about security with anybody of the RCMP”. These are very choice words of a very experienced lawyer, but unfortunately the facts do not bear out that statement.

Why will the Prime Minister not turn up in Vancouver, testify under oath and be subjected to proper cross-examination?

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, they have heard a lot of witnesses. I repeat what I said, and it was sustained by all the people who were involved and who have testified. We have given 10,000 pages of documentation. Everybody who was requested to testify has testified.

I repeat in front of the nation and in front of God, if you want, because my name is Chrétien and I have no problem with that, that I never discussed security with anybody with the RCMP.

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Reform Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, we seem to gain a sense of how the Prime Minister sees himself.

The Prime Minister said “Let the commission do its job”. The key question for this commission is where the influence came for the RCMP to undertake the actions which they did. I believe that they came from the Prime Minister. Why will he not appear in front of the commission so that the commission can do its job?

Apec InquiryOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I said, and I repeat, the RCMP had a job to do and they did the job. Now they are explaining whether or not they made a mistake.

I wanted and everybody in Canada wanted to make sure that every leader who came to Canada was secure in Canada. It was the responsibility of the RCMP. I let them do their job and they did it.

If somebody has committed some mistake the commission will report to the Canadian public.

Air TransportationOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Bloc Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, by casting serious doubts on the government's intentions as far as the rule of ownership is concerned, the Minister of Transport is deliberately creating confusion. The shareholders of Air Canada will need to reach a decision before long and they must have all of the information in hand with which to make that decision an informed one.

Does the Minister of Transport commit to clarifying his point of view as far as the rules of ownership are concerned before the all-shareholder meeting scheduled for next November 8?

Air TransportationOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I will be speaking on that subject before the committee an hour from now.

Air TransportationOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Bloc Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I hope we will learn something during the committee meeting, later on.

Last year, when the bank mergers were being debated, the government used excessive concentration as justification for the 10% rule on bank ownership, citing public interest. In the case of the airlines, the eventual outcome would be a monopoly. So the danger of concentration is quite real.

Should this same government not apply the same logic once again, and restrict ownership to the same 10% level, in the name of the public interest?

Air TransportationOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I have already said, I will be addressing this issue in committee this afternoon.

Air TransportationOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Bloc Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, although Onex's plan to acquire Air Canada and Canadian Airlines is contrary to existing legislation, its president, Gerald Schwartz, is not hesitating to invest much time and money promoting it throughout Canada.

Can the Minister of Transport assure us that the hope of acceptance for his proposal on which Onex's president is relying is not the direct result of personal guarantees received from certain members of the government since the beginning of this affair?

Air TransportationOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, there have been no discussions with members of the government on this topic.