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House of Commons Hansard #38 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was foundation.

Topics

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am not sure what the point was of the point of privilege. I am pleased to have the opportunity to be very clear on precisely what has taken place in this very sad affair.

The fact of the matter is—

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Apologize.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, I trust I will be given the same courtesy as the hon. member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. The hon. member for Burnaby—Douglas has the floor.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, earlier today, at a press conference held by the hon. member for Sarnia—Lambton and the hon. member from Mississauga, the vice-chair of the foreign affairs committee, those two members confirmed that the travel within Sudan by the delegation that included the hon. member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca was paid for by an oil consortium which included Talisman Energy. That was confirmed directly by those members.

Furthermore, with respect to the travel and the cost of travel of the three members from Canada to Sudan, the fact is that Talisman Energy contributed significant funds to the National Council on Canada Arab Relations, which in turn were used to fund the travel of the three members who went to Sudan.

Talisman Energy funded the National Council on Canada Arab Relations with respect to this matter. Talisman Energy funded the travel within Sudan. Frankly, it is appalling that hon. members of this place would accept a trip funded by Talisman Energy, which has been complicit in some of the most egregious human rights violations in Sudan.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I think it is clear that there is a disagreement as to facts in this case. Unless the hon. member has something that is quite new to introduce into the matter, I would caution him. I do not want to protract the debate, because I think that is what we are into here.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Canadian Alliance Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Burnaby—Douglas does not get it. He is impugning, as he said in the House of Commons yesterday, that we knowingly went on this trip paid for by Talisman oil.

I asked prior to the trip who was paying for it, and it was the Canada Arab Council. After the trip I asked whether Talisman had paid for it. I received a document, which I will table in the House, that clearly states it was the Canada Arab Council and not Talisman oil that paid for it.

I demand that the member for Burnaby—Douglas stop misleading the House and apologize to me and my colleagues.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

If the hon. member wants to seek leave of the House to table his letter, he may do so, but I think we ought to leave the matter there.

It appears there is a disagreement and I do not think it is one the Chair will be able to resolve. The members have different views of the facts of the case as is apparent from the submissions we have heard. If we go on further, we will hear a lot more.

Does the hon. member wish to seek consent of the House to table those documents?

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Canadian Alliance Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Yes, Mr. Speaker.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Does the hon. member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca have unanimous consent of the House to table this letter?

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Will the hon. member for Burnaby—Douglas be adding anything new to this question of privilege? I do not really want to hear more on it.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, the fundamental question is: Talisman Energy paid the national council to—

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

That is a continuing dispute. The hon. member for Prince George—Bulkley Valley on a point of order.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dick Harris Canadian Alliance Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I will withdraw my point of order. I think the member for Surrey Central has the same point of order.

Points Of OrderOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gurmant Grewal Canadian Alliance Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, during question period when I was asking a question of the Prime Minister regarding the racial slurs uttered by the Secretary of State for Multiculturalism, the Minister of Canadian Heritage very clearly and loudly said “What would you know about Christians?”

First we are dealing with racial slurs and now we are dealing with religious slurs. I believe all members in the House should treat all religions equally and respectfully. I am offended by the minister's comments, and I would ask her to withdraw her comments and apologize to the House.

Points Of OrderOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Canadian Alliance Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise on the same point of order. When my colleague was referring to the junior minister of multiculturalism he was talking about a pattern we have seen in her behaviour over the years about Kamloops cross burnings and about behaviour and cross burnings in Prince George.

I said across the aisle not to forget about their attacks on Christians during the campaign, a particularly ugly scene that I am sure she is ashamed of. That spurred the Minister of Canadian Heritage to hoot across the aisle: what do I know about Christians.

I guess I know something because I am a Christian. I am certainly not perfect. I would be the first to admit it. It is a pattern of this minister and it is shameful.

Points Of OrderOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I can only say that I know it is very important for all hon. members to treat each other with respect in the Chamber, both during question period and at all other times. I urge such a course on all hon. members.

Government Response To PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

March 28th, 2001 / 3:10 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to two petitions.

Food And Drugs ActRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis NDP Winnipeg North Centre, MB

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-310, an act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (mandatory labelling for genetically modified foods).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce a bill to amend the Food and Drugs Act with the specific purpose of legislating mandatory labelling of genetically modified foods.

The bill flows from growing concerns about the rapid entry of genetically modified organisms into the marketplace without the benefit of long term safety studies and without public information.

The bill provides for the full public disclosure of all genetically engineered products and gives consumers the right to choose.

I would like to credit the work of a former Bloc member for Louis-Hébert, Madam Hélène Alarie, who worked diligently on this matter and had actually introduced a similar bill in the last parliament.

I also want to acknowledge the work of the member for Davenport who introduced Bill C-287 which also deals with the question of genetically modified organisms and which has been deemed votable.

I think all this shows the growing concern in parliament for this matter.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

National Horse Of Canada ActRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Liberal Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-311, an act to provide for the recognition of the Canadien horse as the national horse of Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased again to reintroduce the national horse of Canada act, an act to provide for the recognition of the Canadien horse as the national horse of Canada.

This sturdy little horse has played a role in Canadian history since its arrival in New France in 1665 from the stables of Louis XIV. It has acclimatized to our harsh conditions evolving into a breed that is strong for its size, intelligent, well-tempered, resilient and determined. These qualities make it a perfect symbol for Canada.

Though indispensable to the inhabitants of New France, and later to the maritimes, Ontario and the west, this horse faced extinction by the end of the 19th century. Breeders have restored and developed this breed so that today there are more than 1,000 Canadien horses in Canada.

The national recognition would increase the profile of this breed, enhance its marketability and assure its future as the great Canadian symbol it is.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Statistics ActRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Liberal Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-312, an act to amend the Statistics Act and the National Archives of Canada Act (census records).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to reintroduce a bill to allow the public release of the post-1901 census records. The bill is intended to amend the Statistics Act and the National Archives of Canada Act to allow the transfer of census records from Statistics Canada to the National Archives of Canada where records could be released to the public subject to the Privacy Act.

The main element of the bill, that census records be keep secret for 92 years and released to researchers after that time, is the key recommendation of the expert panel on the access to historical census records. That panel was established by the Minister of Industry, and its recommendations were released in December 2000.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Treaties ActRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Bloc Mercier, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bills C-313, an act respecting the negotiation, approval, tabling and publication of treaties.

Mr. Speaker, the five bills I am introducing today are intended to remedy some serious shortcomings. Their intent is to force the government to table in the House all drafts of international treaties before they are ratified.

As well, their purpose is to force the government to give the public access to the texts of all international treaties to which it is a party.

At this time the government is making international commitments it cannot meet, because the provinces are the ones responsible for their implementation. My intention is to put in place a formal process for consulting the provinces.

I wish to attack the democratic deficit and require the government to hold public consultations before major treaties are signed, as we do before bills are passed, and to obtain the assent of the House of Commons.

I salute my former colleague, Daniel Turp, who was the one behind this bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)