This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #31 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Bonin Liberal Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, I stand in response to a point of privilege that was raised in the House on November 21 by the members of the New Democratic Party, the Bloc Quebecois and the Progressive Conservative Party. I will scan through my notes because I will be providing you with documents supporting what I am about to present to the House.

The first document is a notice of the original notice of the meeting which was provided to the members at 11:45 on November 15. It clearly indicates that the meeting would be 11:00 to 12:30, a public hearing; 12:30 to 1:00 a clause by clause. This was decided by the members of the committee at a previous meeting by a vote.

The next document, the Speaker will notice that the notice of motion, in addition to being short of 48 hours notice, does not make reference to it being disposed of before doing clause by clause.

Further, the decision to do clause by clause at 1 p.m. that day was a decision of the committee. It was decided by a vote of members of the committee.

Mr. Speaker, you will then see an amendment to the notice of meeting to accommodate the notice of motion of the member for Windsor—St. Clair. You will that the notice of motion was received by the clerk at 4:21 p.m. on November 19. Forty-eight hours would have brought us up to 4:21 p.m. on November 21, 2 hours after the planned meeting to do clause by clause.

As a courtesy, we dealt with the notice of motion at 11 a.m., 5 hours short of the 48 hours, to accommodate the mover.

The Speaker will see the amendment to the agenda where it has been indicated that Greenpeace declined to appear and it was the choice again of the member for Windsor—St. Clair. The member asked that Greenpeace be replaced by the Sierra Club of Canada and again as a courtesy to that member I agreed.

In dealing with the notice of motion from the member for Windsor--St. Clair, the Speaker will note that the hour of 11:30 was quickly approaching and that the blues will reveal that the chair did bring this to the attention of the members, who chose not to allow others to speak on it.

There was a motion by a member of the committee to call the question. The chair did put the question to the committee, and I quote the blues:

I am asking the floor to vote. If you want me to call the question at this time or not.

The record reveals that seven members voted yes to call the question and one member voted no.

Mr. Speaker, you will further note that the members who brought this point of privilege to your attention were: the member for Acadie--Bathurst, who was nowhere near Room 237-C at the time of the meeting; the member for Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, who attends the aboriginal affairs and northern development issues; and his colleague, the member for Sherbrooke, who deals with natural resources issues, and who voted to call the question. The member for South Shore, who is one of 87 associate members, as is the member for Windsor--St.Clair, voted in favour of calling the question.

I feel that this filibuster has more to do with the leadership race of the fourth party than with the good work of the committee.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Yvon Godin NDP Acadie—Bathurst, NB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to go on record concerning what my colleague said in the House of Commons about me not being at the committee.

The member is right, I was not on the committee, which is what I said when I raised my point of privilege. It was that he was debating a motion when the question was put. Normally, when we are in committee and we put a motion we have a fair amount of time to argue our motion. I do not feel it is very democratic to put a motion and not be able to debate it.

As my colleague said a few minutes ago, the motion was moved that the question be put. As the whip of the party I do not believe that was the right way to do it. What he said about this being raised because of the leadership race, I feel is a cheap shot. Does that mean that anyone entering into a leadership race cannot bring to the committee a point that he feels needs to be mentioned for the good running of Parliament?

For those reasons I do not agree with the way he has addressed this issue. However, Mr. Speaker, I will wait for your decision.

PrivilegeOral Question Period

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The Chair wants again to thank hon. members for their interventions on this point of order.

I have indicated that I have the matter under advisement. It will remain under advisement until I come back to the House when I hope I can humour the hon. member for Acadie—Bathurst, as well as the hon. member for Nickel Belt, with a ruling.

Government Response to PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Halifax West Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's responses to 18 petitions.

Criminal CodeRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Canadian Alliance Prince George—Peace River, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-318, an act to amend the Criminal Code and the Young Offenders Act (capital punishment).

Mr. Speaker, over the weekend we learned of yet another home invasion in the Ottawa area where two prominent members of this community were brutally murdered. It followed similar home invasion murders in Maple Ridge, B.C. and another in Toronto, all over a period of a little more than a week.

Since first being elected nine years ago, I have introduced a bill repeatedly that would amend the Criminal Code to impose capital punishment on those found guilty of this type of violent, cold-blooded, first degree murder.

As well, my bill would prohibit convicts of second degree murder from applying for sentence reductions.

The Young Offenders Act would also be amended to lengthen the sentences for people under the age of 18 who have committed first or second degree murder.

In light of these senseless murders, the Liberal government must realize that the time for providing strong deterrents and appropriate punishment is now.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

November 25th, 2002 / 3:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jason Kenney Canadian Alliance Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to rise in order to present a petition on behalf of several hundred members of my constituency and residents of Calgary calling on the government to withdraw the long-arm firearm registry, commonly known as Bill C-68, and to replace it with more severe penalties for the criminal use of firearms.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Antoine Dubé Bloc Lévis-Et-Chutes-De-La-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to lay upon the table a petition from Amnesty International supporters who held a convention in my riding on November 9.

The petition states, and I will read a short paragraph:

We urge the House of Commons of Canada to give paramount importance to the protection of human rights and to the humanitarian concerns about for the life and safety of the Iraqi population. We do not want Canada to engage in a military operation unilaterally decided, contrary to United Nations resolutions, by a superpower, as is currently the case with the United States.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle Progressive Conservative St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from a number of my constituents in the St. John's area making the point that non-embryonic stem cells, which are also known as adult stem cells, have shown significant research progress without the immune rejection or ethical problems associated with embryonic stem cells.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to focus its legislative support on adult stem cell research to find the cures and therapies necessary to treat the illnesses and diseases of suffering Canadians.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Liberal Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to present one in a series of petitions from people of Peterborough concerned about the exploitation of children for pornographic purposes.

The petitioners point out that the creation and use of child pornography is condemned by the vast majority of Canadians but that the courts have not applied the current child pornography law in a way which makes it clear that such exploitation of children will always be met with swift punishment.

They call upon Parliament to protect our children by taking all necessary steps to ensure that all materials which promote or glorify pedophilia or sado-masochistic activities involving children be outlawed.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Canadian Alliance West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure of presenting petitions I have received from constituents.

I have 10 separate petitions totalling approximately 1,026 signatures which call on Parliament to outlaw all material that promotes pedophilia and child pornography.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Canadian Alliance West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have two separate petitions, totalling approximately 280 signatures, calling on Parliament to prohibit human cloning and that embryonic humans beings not be destroyed to harvest stem cells.

I also have four separate petitions, totalling approximately 189 signatures, calling on Parliament to use adult stem cell research to find cures for illness and disease.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Canadian Alliance Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions to present today.

In the first one the petitioners call upon the government to have a public inquiry to look into the relationship between the Liberal Party of Canada and some advertising agency with which it has had millions of dollars worth of dealings.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Canadian Alliance Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, in the second petition the petitioners call upon the House to look into stem cell research for the treatment of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, diabetes, cancer, muscular dystrophy and spinal cord injury. The petitioners urge Parliament to support adult stem cell research to find cures and therapies necessary to treat those illnesses.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Canadian Alliance Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, there are several hundred names on this child pornography petition. It calls upon the government to protect our children by taking all necessary steps to ensure that all materials which promote or glorify pedophilia or sado-masochistic activities involving children are outlawed.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John M. Cummins Canadian Alliance Delta—South Richmond, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have three petitions to present today.

The first one deals with the Coast Guard. The petitioners note that the government is no longer providing adequate funding for the Coast Guard. They suggest that the public is at risk, both at the Vancouver airport through the lack of a hovercraft, and in ongoing search and rescue operations.

The petitioners request that Parliament advise the government to separate the Coast Guard from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and to provide adequate funding.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John M. Cummins Canadian Alliance Delta—South Richmond, BC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition deals with child pornography. The constituents who signed this petition are appalled at the interpretations being given to current child pornography law. They call on Parliament to take all necessary steps to ensure that pedophilia and sado-masochistic activities involving children are outlawed.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

John M. Cummins Canadian Alliance Delta—South Richmond, BC

Mr. Speaker, the third petition has to do with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. The petitioners note that the fisheries minister has a constitutional obligation to protect wild fish in their habitat. They call on Parliament to direct the minister to fulfill his obligation to protect all wild fish in their habitat from the effects of salmon farming.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Progressive Conservative Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, I too have a petition from my constituents that deals with child pornography.

It seems that the last time the government responded, it was to 119 similar petitions. Many petitions of this type have been presented to the House. It is a well-organized legitimate movement. We can see that from coast to coast our constituents, the citizens of this country, have a serious concern when it comes to child pornography.

The petition obviously speaks to a changing of the laws in a way which makes it clear that such exploitation of children will always be met with swift punishment. I am happy to present this petition on behalf of my constituents.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Liberal Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to present.

The first petition concerns the definition of marriage. The petitioners, including constituents from my riding of Mississauga South, believe that fundamental matters of social policy should be decided by Parliament and not by the judiciary. They point out that the majority of Canadians support the current legal definition of marriage being the union of one man and one woman to the exclusion of all others.

Therefore the petitioners call upon Parliament to invoke section 33, the notwithstanding clause, if necessary, to preserve and protect the current definition of marriage.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Liberal Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the next petition is on stem cell research. The petitioners, including people from my own riding of Mississauga South, believe as I do that life begins at conception. They want to advise Parliament that they support ethical stem cell research. They also want to point out that non-embryonic stem cells, also known as adult stem cells, have shown significant research progress without the immune rejection or ethical problems of embryonic stem cells.

The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to pursue legislative support for adult stem cell research to find the cures and therapies necessary for Canadians.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Canadian Alliance Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36 I would like to table a petition containing a further 92 signatures from constituents in my riding of Prince George--Peace River.

The petitioners feel that since a clear majority of Canadians are opposed to child pornography, they call upon the government to introduce legislation that outlaws all forms of pornography involving children in Canada. Artistic merit should not be an excuse for child exploitation and abuse.

I would add further that it is high time the government started listening and paying attention to these petitions that have been tabled by almost all members, if not all members in this place.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Canadian Alliance Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, this petition has a couple of hundred names in total. The petitioners draw attention to the fact that adult stem cell research holds enormous potential and does not pose the serious ethical questions that stem cell research using embryos and aborted fetal tissue does. The petitioners request that the Parliament of Canada ban embryonic research and direct the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to support and fund only promising ethical research that does not involve the destruction of human life.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Canadian Alliance Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

I have a second petition, Mr. Speaker. The petitioners are calling upon the Government of Canada to order an independent public inquiry which in their view is the only way of shedding light on the close links between the Liberal Party and some advertising agencies which have received hundreds of millions of dollars worth of contracts from the government in the past nine years.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Progressive Conservative Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition on behalf of some 150 residents of Calgary Centre and adjacent neighbourhoods. They call upon the government to take all necessary steps to outlaw material that promotes pedophilia or sado-masochistic activities involving children.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Lynne Yelich Canadian Alliance Blackstrap, SK

Mr. Speaker, today I am presenting a petition from constituents in Jansen, Guernsey, Lanigan and Drake, Saskatchewan calling on Parliament to use common sense and not allocate tax dollars for abortions.