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House of Commons Hansard #146 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was endangered.

Topics

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bourassa Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre LiberalMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, a stupid question does not deserve an answer.

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Pallister Canadian Alliance Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, the minister may not be interested in having people earn their way into Canada rather than bribe their way in, but we certainly are.

Under this government people do not get appointed to the immigration review board unless they are just good old fashioned Liberals. Mr. Colavecchio is a former president of the chamber in the riding of Alfonso Gagliano. Mr. Bourbonnais comes from a well known Liberal family in the treasury board president's riding.

Could the minister assure Canadians that these Liberal appointees did not profit from the sale of immigration documents or decisions?

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bourassa Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre LiberalMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, no matter how many cheap political points my colleague wants to score here, first of all I will say that we have a process and this process is based on competence. Everybody has to pass an oral test and a written test. We pick it up from there. Competence is the name of the game.

Highway InfrastructureOral Question Period

February 21st, 2002 / 2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Bloc Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, on a number of occasions, the Minister of Transport has confirmed that there is $108 million in funding available to Quebec over the next four years for highways.

But, for highway 30, the member for Beauharnois--Salaberry promised much more than $108 million. For highway 175, the member for Chicoutimi--Le Fjord promised much more than $108 million. The member for Madawaska--Restigouche announced $108 million for highway 185.

How does the Minister of Transport explain that he thinks he can keep the promises made by his colleagues, when the promises in question have nothing to do with the money available?

Highway InfrastructureOral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I have no problem with the question. It is clear that the Government of Canada thinks that highway 30 is a priority, not only for Montreal and Quebec City, but for all of Canada. We are determined to go ahead with this project.

This morning, I met with my counterpart, Mr. Ménard. We are in agreement on a process to improve all highway systems in the province of Quebec.

Highway InfrastructureOral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Bloc Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, right now, no one in the government can satisfactorily explain how the many promises made by the Liberal members could be kept. Nobody can perform miracles.

There are two possible conclusions: either the government will postpone or eliminate certain projects, and we would like to know which ones, or new money will be added to the existing envelope, and we would like to know how much and when.

Highway InfrastructureOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I would ask the hon. member to be patient. We have an infrastructure program in the budget for 2000. So far, unfortunately, Quebec has not agreed with the provisions of this program. This morning, I spoke with Mr. Ménard about the agreement, and I hope that it will soon be signed.

An infrastructure fund was also announced by the Minister of Finance in the last budget. We are going to look at the whole file in order to ensure improved transportation throughout Canada.

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Monte Solberg Canadian Alliance Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, I want to ask the minister of immigration a question regarding refugee policy so hopefully he will not cite confidentiality as a reason not to answer.

Is it the policy of the government to accept refugee claims from known criminals while they are being held in police custody?

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bourassa Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre LiberalMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I will not answer a specific question.

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Monte Solberg Canadian Alliance Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, it seems we know who really is stupid in this place.

Tafari Rennock was deported from the U.S. two years ago with a lengthy criminal record of convictions for sexual assault, burglary, drug trafficking, robberies, unlawful restraint and probation violations, and he had been jailed for a vicious sexual attack against a woman. Now, while he is in police custody, the minister has granted him refugee status.

Like any good criminal, he uses many aliases. My supplementary question to the minister is, which name will appear on his passport when the minister grants him full Canadian citizenship?

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bourassa Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre LiberalMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, that was it. I do not answer a specific case.

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

ImmigrationOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. The hon. member for Mercier.

Middle EastOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Bloc Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are witnessing in the Middle East an unspeakable escalation of violence that could jeopardize world peace.

Moreover, a growing number of observers are now saying that we will have to go further than what is proposed in the Mitchell and Tennet reports, which could not restore peace or bring a return to negotiations.

Is the implementation of a broader political process not the only solution that could bear fruit, restore peace and bring about a solution to the conflict?

Middle EastOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I agree with the premise of the question.

It goes without saying that a broader process is desirable. However, the hon. member, who is very knowledgeable about foreign affairs, also knows that the agreement of the parties involved in the conflict is necessary before that conflict can be resolved.

Canada's policy is to take a calming approach and convince the parties involved in the conflict to put an end to violence and allow the international community to work with them to restore peace in that very troubled region.

Middle EastOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Bloc Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, who is also well qualified, found that neither the Mitchell report nor the Tennet report restored peace, far from it, and that a political solution was in order.

Does the minister not realize that a broader international coalition has a much better chance of succeeding in implementing this solution, and why should Canada not be one of its promoters?

Middle EastOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am confident that all members of this House share the hon. member's wish for a return to peace in the Middle East.

This year, we have the opportunity to chair the G-8, and I can promise hon. members that the Prime Minister and myself will do our best to convince our G-8 colleagues to take part in a peace process in the Middle East.

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Canadian Alliance Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, we have government documents that show the RCMP and CSIS are not sharing vital information despite a written agreement to do so.

With the threat of terrorism operating within our borders, a plague of missing refugee claimants and biker gangs flexing their muscles, how long will the solicitor general sit idly by and let our public security agencies wage a turf war?

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is unfortunate that my hon. colleague, in these trying times, is trying to indicate that we do not have one of the best, if not the best, police forces in the RCMP and CSIS. We have very competent security intelligence agencies. I meet them every week and they share information to make sure that Canadian society remains one of the safest, if not the safest, societies to live in.

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Canadian Alliance Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is this RCMP agency that is voicing the concern. These documents confirm a longstanding fear. For the whole time the government has been in power our federal police and our intelligence agencies have not been communicating properly.

Now more than ever Canadians need their security agencies to co-operate. Would the solicitor general tell Canadians what specific and concrete action he will take to finally break this log-jam of information between the RCMP, that great police force, and CSIS?

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think my hon. colleague is well aware that for the last six months the RCMP and CSIS have worked very co-operatively together.

It is not impossible that there could be some problems with information sharing. It is an ongoing issue to make sure that all the information is shared and shared properly. The RCMP and CSIS have both indicated to me that this is a very important point for both agencies, to make sure they share the information, not only among themselves but they share the appropriate information with their colleagues, the FBI and other agencies around the world.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Liberal Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for Central and Eastern Europe and the Middle East. In light of his recent visit to Ukraine, could the secretary of state inform the House of Commons regarding the present status of Canada-Ukraine relations?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Elgin—Middlesex—London Ontario

Liberal

Gar Knutson LiberalSecretary of State (Central and Eastern Europe and Middle East)

Mr. Speaker, I was warmly welcomed on the tenth anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Canada and the Ukraine. As my hon. colleague knows, there are one million Canadians of Ukraine heritage who call Canada home and they form a vital and valued part of Canadian society.

I met with foreign minister Zlenko and other senior members of the Ukrainian government where I strongly emphasized Canada's commitment to the conduct of free and fair parliamentary elections and I strongly reiterated Canada's support for Ukraine's efforts in the area of political and economic reform. The federal government will continue to call for closer ties with Ukraine.

Kyoto ProtocolOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin NDP Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, recently we have seen Canada's commitment to the Kyoto accord come under increasing attack from the oil industry and premier Ralph Klein, both of whom are saying that meeting our emission reduction targets will impact negatively on the Canadian economy.

Why does the federal government not counter these attacks with the facts of what it will cost Canada if we do not proceed with the Kyoto accord? Could the Minister of Health indicate whether there is any data within her department about what it would cost the health of Canadians and what the financial costs would be to the health care system if we were to reduce those harmful emissions? Will she share those facts with the House?

Kyoto ProtocolOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we are working with the provinces, territories and with industry to make sure we get the best appreciation of the costs of differing approaches to meeting minus six per cent of 1990 levels, which is our Kyoto commitment.

I am sure the hon. member would agree that it is better to work together with them, as we will be doing at the joint ministerial meeting in Victoria on Monday and Tuesday, rather than simply exchanging comments and criticisms of differing points of view of differing jurisdictions.