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House of Commons Hansard #150 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was wto.

Topics

2 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada, and we will be led by the hon. member for Crowfoot.

[Editor's Note: Members sang the national anthem]

Canadian Music WeekStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Tony Tirabassi Liberal Niagara Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I share in the celebration of our music industry. February 27 to March 3 is Canadian Music Week and every year the creators, broadcasters and entrepreneurs involved in our music industry get together to share visions, celebrate successes and lay the groundwork for addressing the new challenges they face.

For many, names like Alanis Morissette, Marie-Jo Thério, Barenaked Ladies, Céline Dion, Nickelback, Sarah McLachlan, Garou and other superstars define Canadian music. Canadian music as a whole is a great success story with Canadian songwriters and musicians from all corners of the country playing an important role capturing and reflecting the diverse Canadian experience.

I congratulate all participants in Canadian Music Week. Let us not forget that now more than ever it is important that all Canadians support our Canadian musicians by enjoying their music.

Mattie McCulloughStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Canadian Alliance Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, this last week Red Deer, Alberta and Canada lost a truly great woman. Mattie McCullough died at age 92 and her great significance to our community was recognized last Saturday.

Mattie had many accomplishments in her life. She was a recipient of the Order of Canada, a long-time champion of education, president of the Alberta Home and School Councils' Association, honorary president of the Canadian Angus Association, holder of an honorary doctor of laws degree from the University of Alberta, and many more. Most important was that Mattie was so humble, always willing to listen, and always providing a sharp analysis of everything political. At age 86 she even enrolled in a university class.

I first met Mattie when her Angus bull chased me and my biology class out of their pasture. From then on we became the best of friends.

Mattie was always excited about education. She mastered the computer and could not believe the new information she could get from the Internet.

Our community and Canada lost a true Canadian and we will miss Mattie McCullough.

2002 Winter OlympicsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro Liberal York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, millions of Canadians followed our Olympic athletes on their road to gold. Thanks to the wonderful power of TV and radio, Canadians from coast to coast watched and listened as the CBC broadcast the thrilling performance of these extraordinary Olympians.

Our public broadcasting network deserves the highest accolades for its outstanding coverage. The CBC gave us a dazzling show of athletes performing at their finest hour, and by doing so drew the country together in a spirit of passion and national pride. It was a special time for all of us.

I congratulate the producers, the directors, the technicians and the announcers who made it all possible, who brought the Olympic Winter Games into our homes and entrenched them into our hearts. Just as we have every reason to be proud of our athletes, so too we take pride in the CBC which truly showed us what Canada is all about and what we are made of. I thank the CBC.

2002 Winter OlympicsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Liberal Bras D'Or—Cape Breton, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is indeed a great pleasure to stand in the House today and congratulate the tremendous Olympic performance of our Canadian athletes, and in particular to acknowledge the contribution of Cape Breton's own Al MacInnis.

As the senior statesman of the men's hockey team, Al's on ice performance was equalled only by his poise and leadership. Al has long been recognized for his tremendous skill but more so as a consummate team player. The pride and joy of Port Hood, Cape Breton epitomizes all that is good about sport and represents the truth that in our great country, Canada, dreams can come true.

I am certain that all Canadians are very proud of the entire Olympic contingent, but let it be known that none are more proud of their own than the people of Cape Breton.

2002 Winter OlympicsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Liberal Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, the Olympic flame went out, marking the end of the Salt Lake City winter games and the return of our Canadian athletes.

Among them, Tania Vincent and Amélie Goulet-Nadon, two young athletes from Laval, proudly came home with the bronze medal they won in the 3,000 metre short track speed skating relay. Tania Vincent had already won a bronze medal at the Nagano games, in Japan, in the same event.

Pascal Richard, who grew up in Laval, finished 15th in the skeleton event.

I join my fellow citizens of Laval in congratulating our Canadian athletes who, throughout the Salt Lake City games, made us share their Olympic dream.

JusticeStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Vic Toews Canadian Alliance Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, in less than three months two RCMP officers in Manitoba have been shot, one of them fatally. Just last week the home of another Winnipeg police officer was firebombed in a suspected gang related act of intimidation. In both shootings we know that some of the suspects were wanted for parole violations.

While criminals in Canada are increasingly more willing to use violence against our police officers, our solicitor general continues to accelerate the process of early release that will see more dangerous offenders released from his club fed style prisons. This not only defies common sense but it puts police at an unacceptable risk.

In order to restore public confidence in our justice system and to give police the support they need the Liberal government must act immediately to require criminals to earn their parole and to restore badly needed funding to our frontline police officers.

Film IndustryStatements By Members

February 27th, 2002 / 2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, last night fans of the Canadian film industry were swept off their feet with the debut of Men With Brooms at the Museum of Civilization. Featuring Canadian film stars Leslie Nielsen and Paul Gross, Men With Brooms has proven that our film industry is a strong player on the international stage.

I am equally delighted to congratulate the National Film Board and Winnipeg animator Cordell Barker for his second Oscar nomination for the short animated film entitled Strange Invaders . In 1989 Cordell Barker received his first Oscar nomination for the hilarious short film The Cat Came Back . This latest accolade amounts to the 66th Oscar nomination for the National Film Board over the past 63 years.

I am sure that all Canadians will join me in wishing good luck to the National Film Board and Cordell Barker as we await the Oscar award winners on March 24.

Kim St-PierreStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Robert Lanctôt Bloc Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my Bloc Québécois colleagues and myself, I wish to congratulate Kim St-Pierre, the goaltender for our women's hockey team, which won the gold medal at the Salt Lake City winter Olympics.

Kim St-Pierre, who is from Châteauguay, is the perfect example of an athlete who makes sacrifices to achieve her goal and who believes in her ability to reach the ultimate objective, an Olympic medal.

At the age of 3, Kim was already enrolled in figure skating. Later on, she discovered hockey and decided to make the necessary efforts to succeed in that sport. Kim was also an excellent softball and soccer player. Our gold medal winner wants to resume her kinesitherapy classes at the university as soon as possible. This will enable her to use her experience and to provide practical advice to our future athletes.

We are proud of her talent, her courage and her determination. Through her perseverance, she is showing that it is possible to achieve our goals and to fulfill our dreams. she is a distinguished ambassador for all Quebecers.

Bravo Kim!

Medical Hall of FameStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Joe Fontana Liberal London North Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we are honouring eight very special Canadians as they are welcomed into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. These leaders and pioneers have contributed greatly to medicine in the areas of muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis, cancer treatment, cell biology, neuropsychology, disease treatment and genetic research.

The Canadian Medical Hall of Fame and museum is a national organization that was established in 1993 in London, Ontario to pay tribute to the Canadian men and women who mark the history of medicine and to inspire the next generation. To date the organization has honoured 49 of Canada's medical heroes.

I congratulate these eight laureates for their remarkable achievements. Their contributions have not only impacted the well-being of Canadians but have made an impact across the globe, and we thank them for their contributions. They too are the gold medallists of the world.

Harry RankinStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise to pay tribute today to Harry Rankin, long-time Vancouver civic politician, lawyer and social activist who died yesterday at the age of 81.

Harry Rankin served the people of Vancouver and British Columbia well. He was a member of city council in Vancouver, first elected in 1966 and retiring after almost 30 years in 1993.

In his career he always spoke out on behalf of what he called the little guy. He was also a respected lawyer who had a reputation of going to bat in court for the underprivileged, for the labour movement and for civil liberties issues. He was a bencher of the law society as well.

My colleague from Vancouver East is a former colleague of his from Vancouver city council. Another former colleague from city council, fellow councillor Pat Wilson, said Harry Rankin “dominated Vancouver city politics for almost 30 years and at the peak of his influence there was no more articulate, passionate or effective champion of ordinary people at any level of politics”.

Harry Rankin was a great Canadian and certainly all of us will mourn his passing. We extend our condolences to his wife Connie Fogal and to his family.

Canadian Wheat BoardStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

David Anderson Canadian Alliance Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, today the Auditor General of Canada completed a one time audit of the Canadian Wheat Board. In her report she makes several recommendations that must not fall upon deaf ears.

However she was not permitted to examine all Canadian Wheat Board activities. Her audit was limited to the study of management practices. The auditor general was not permitted to examine the cost of the Canadian Wheat Board monopoly to farmers or the role and mandate of the board.

When will the minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board commit to allowing the auditor general to conduct regular and full audits of the Canadian Wheat Board in order to allow western Canadian farmers to know how much the system is costing them?

In Ontario the wheat producers have been required to market their grain through the Ontario Wheat Board. However in the last few years Ontario farmers have been allowed to market 20% of their own grain crop. Soon Ontario farmers will be allowed to market a third of their own crop outside of the board and eventually they will be allowed to market their entire production.

When will the minister, who is supposed to be representing western Canadian interests, give western Canadian farmers the same opportunity?

Guaranteed Income SupplementStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Gérard Binet Liberal Frontenac—Mégantic, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois loves to stir up panic among seniors about the guaranteed income supplement. As soon as the report by the Standing Committee on Human Resource Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities was tabled, I took the initiative of informing seniors on their entitlement to these benefits.

My office received more than 425 calls, and after investigation it was found that only 5% of cases needed to be harmonized.

The Bloc Québécois loves to perpetuate myths among the population by playing on their vulnerability and insecurity, merely for political gain. This is unacceptable.

TaxationStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, more and more Quebecers are realizing, with indignation, the unjust tax imbalance that is happening year after year between Ottawa and the provinces.

The Minister of Finance, the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, the Prime Minister, all say this is a myth, that it does not exist. This is a fine illustration of the traditional hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil, of people who do not want to hear anything, see anything and most particularly say anything.

But this reality does exist and we have clearly demonstrated its existence. The reality is that the federal government has recorded an increase in receipts of some 45% since 1994-95. The reality is that the federal government has recorded $13.4 billion in surplus funds in the first nine months of the year.

The reality of the provinces and of Quebec, however, is far less rosy. The sick are the first ones to fall victim to this scandalous situation.

Yet on the other side of this House, there they are closing their eyes, covering their ears and, if they do open their mouths, it is to distort reality.

Kyoto ProtocolStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Liberal Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, during a Team Canada trip last week some of the premiers presented a letter to the Prime Minister opposing ratification of the Kyoto protocol. I was sorry to see that the premier of my home province was among them.

After our farmers have faced four years of drought, I would expect the premiers to show more concern about global warming. How many wells have to run dry each summer? How many lakes and rivers have to die? How many children and seniors have to suffer from respiratory diseases before Premier Hamm will consider our environment a top priority?

I urge all Canadians to press the premiers to support the Kyoto protocol so we can all breathe a little easier.

Softwood LumberStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Progressive Conservative Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, today British Columbia's forestry minister joined the chorus of softwood stakeholders calling for a united Canadian stand against the American attack on our softwood lumber industry. For months politicians, foresters and manufacturers have called for the Minister for International Trade to bring all of the stakeholders together to establish a single united position.

Although the U.S. is well organized and well prepared, we have never established our own Canadian bargaining stance. Instead each region has established its own direction. Never did the phrase united we stand, divided we fall apply so aptly. It is hard to imagine how an outcome that will be satisfactory to all regions can be concluded if all the stakeholders have not been brought together by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

Even though there are only a few days left, I urge the minister to gather together all stakeholders to develop that one specific Canadian position for our bargaining stance.

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast B.C.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Canadian AllianceLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in a report titled “Pain Without Gain” Canadian manufacturers and exporters warned today that ratifying Kyoto could lead to the loss of 450,000 jobs. Does the Prime Minister accept these figures and if so, how could he dream of ratifying the Kyoto protocol?

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I do not accept those figures.

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast B.C.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Canadian AllianceLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister does not believe the former cabinet minister he himself appointed as head of the CBC. Perhaps he will believe the government of the province most affected by Kyoto.

Alberta estimates that Kyoto could cost Canada 2% to 3% of GDP. That is $25 billion to $40 billion by the year 2010.

Does the Prime Minister believe Alberta's numbers and if so, how can the Prime Minister support the Kyoto protocol?

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the government wants to implement the Kyoto protocol and we have negotiated to improve it. We are still asking to have clean energy exports of Canada recognized. We are talking with the provincial governments at this time to reach an agreement between all the partners. We have to make sure that we make a contribution to ensure that the climate of the world improves in the years to come.

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast B.C.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Canadian AllianceLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if the Prime Minister does not believe Perrin Beatty and Ralph Klein, then perhaps he will believe Industry Canada.

Somebody said they are Tories. That may be true, but let me talk about Industry Canada and what it has to say. Industry Canada's studies show that Kyoto could cost Canada up to $75 billion per year and lead to the loss of 4% of oil, agriculture and chemical jobs, 9% of natural gas jobs and 11% of electrical jobs.

Is shutting down the economy of Canada the Prime Minister's legacy for Canada?

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, there is at this moment some discussion among the provincial governments and the federal government to look at all the facts.

There is the reality too that climate change is causing a lot of problems, for example to the climate in western Canada. Farmers there might pay a price in the future if we do not do anything about it.

We have to look at both sides of the problem. As usual, we will look at all the facts and make a decision in the best interests of all Canadians.

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rahim Jaffer Canadian Alliance Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the only global warming is in the Liberal caucus these days.

Manufacturers and exporters have sounded the alarm. According to them, Kyoto could cost us 450,000 jobs. Even the slowest Liberal, such as the Minister of National Defence—if it were explained to him several times—should be able to realize the catastrophic effect this could have on our economy.

Why is this government so determined to ratify this dangerous protocol, without even getting the provinces' consent?

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, regarding the comments from the opposition on party unity, we know that this party will soon have its fourth or fifth leader in eight years, so we have nothing to learn from them. There is also another party that has ended up back there in the corner.

I would like to say that we are giving this problem serious thought. This is a very serious problem that concerns all Canadians. We have nothing to gain by trying to frighten people when we do not have all of the facts. When we do have all of the facts, we will make the right—

The EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Edmonton—Strathcona.