House of Commons Hansard #46 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pornography.

Topics

Question No. 44Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Health

The answer is as follows:

(a) We have 250 macaques, of which 223 are kept at the Health Canada, Sir Frederick Banting Research Centre (Ottawa) and 27 are kept at the Anthropology Laboratory, University of Montréal, Ste-Madeleine, Quebec.

(b) Ste-Madeleine: No cages are in use.

Ottawa: In total, 35 animals are kept in cages; 8 of these macaques are in individual cages for health reasons or an inability to coexist (social misfit) with others, while 27 are paired.

(c) Ste-Madeleine: No cages in use.

Ottawa: Exercise run; 5.5'h X 2.5'w X 6'd; 8 cages are in use (1 or 2 macaques per cage). Custom cages for males; 8'h X 4'w X 4'd; 10 cages in use (2 macaques per cage). Allentown cages; 34"h X 24"w X 28" d; 2 cages used (1 sick female per cage). Cadillac cages; 28"h X 24"w; 24"d; none are presently in use (1 animal per cage when needed). This type of cage is used to house sick troop females in the ante-room to favour their acceptance by troop mates upon their return (once healed).

(d) Ste-Madeleine: Loose housing room; 13'h X 21'w X 100'd; 1 troop of 27 animals (adults, juveniles, infants).

Ottawa: Loose housing rooms; 7.5'h X 10'w X 15'd; 17 rooms (10 to 12 females and one male per room for a total of 15 troops housed in this manner. Two free rooms are maintained to allow sanitation to be done and the troops all rotate to a new room approximately every 10 days.

Health Canada has made improvements to the animal holding facilities, consistent with the recommendations of the 1997 report of the Royal Society Expert Panel.

(e) The monkeys receive, once a day, biscuits commercially available for macaques called Purina Nonhuman Primate Regular Chow. Fresh fruits, vegetables and various treats (sunflowers, peanuts, etc.) are also served daily. Food is always provided on the litter to favour their natural foraging instinct.

(f) There is no ban on access to the facility. However, visits and visitors must be controlled in order to maintain the disease free status of the animals, and maintain a suitable environment. Visitors must adhere to the medical requirements as outlined in our standard operating procedure. This requirement is the same for everyone accessing the colony, including staff.

Question No. 49Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Canadian Alliance Yorkton—Melville, SK

With respect to statements made by the Minister of Justice in the House of Commons on February 16, 1995 (Hansard, pp. 9707-9709), how has universal gun registration: ( a ) reduced the number of deaths due to domestic violence; ( b ) reduced the number of suicides; ( c ) reduced the number of firearms accidents; ( d ) reduced the number of guns smuggled into Canada; ( e ) reduced the number of guns stolen; ( f ) reduced the number of guns traded on the black market; ( g ) reduced the number of legally imported guns that are sold illegally; ( h ) reduced the illegal acquisition and smuggling of ammunition; ( i ) improved compliance with safe storage laws; ( j ) increased the number of firearms seized as a result of enforcement of firearms prohibition orders; ( k ) improved the likelihood that the police will know where all the guns are; ( l ) affected the percentage of police who are in favour of universal firearms registration; ( m ) improved the accuracy of statistics regarding the number of guns and gun owners; and ( n ) been justified by the costs when compared to the benefits?

Question No. 49Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Outremont Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

The answer is as follows:

(a) According to Statistics Canada, firearms were the most frequently used weapon in the commission of spousal homicides between 1974 and 2000, accounting for the death of 37% of victims. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: a Statistical Profile 2002--Table 1.8)

Most domestic shootings involved long guns such as rifles and shotguns. In 1998, 63% of spousal firearm homicides were committed with shotguns or rifles. A further 21% used sawed-off shotguns or rifles. Only 16% used handguns. (Source: Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile 2000. Statistics Canada: Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics. July 2000)

(b) The rate of suicide deaths involving firearms has been steadily decreasing. In 1999, the percentage of suicides involving a firearm was 19%, from 43.7% in 1970. (Source: Statistics Canada: Causes of Death).

(c) The rate of firearms accidents has also been declining from 129 in 1970 to 31 in 1999. (Source: Statistics Canada: Causes of Death).

Overall, Canada’s homicide rate is at its lowest since 1967 and homicide committed with rifles and shotguns is steadily decreasing. The rate of robberies committed with a firearm has also declined by 62% since 1991, after consistently dropping over the past decade. (Source: Crime Statistics in Canada, 2001, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics).

(d) Regarding firearms trafficking and firearms smuggling, provisions in the Criminal Code and Firearms Act establish increased controls over firearms imports and exports, and impose penalties for smuggling and trafficking.

(e) The number of lost or missing firearms has declined by 68% from 1998 to 2001 and the number of stolen firearms has also decreased by 35% over the same period. (Source: 2001 Registrar’s Report to the Solicitor General on the Administration of the Firearms Act)

(f) The national weapons enforcement support team (NWEST), set up by the Department of Justice, is a unit of highly trained and experienced individuals who work in a support role with local law enforcement to assist in anti-trafficking and anti-smuggling efforts. The team also helps the police community in dealing with issues of violence with firearms.

Over the past year NWEST has provided support to over 2000 police files dealing with weapons, playing a key role in improving public safety and proving highly successful in helping police fight firearm related crime.

(g) NWEST has established links to a number of international law enforcement agencies, in particular the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF). Cooperation between the ATF and NWEST is important, as many of the firearms entering Canada, whether legally or illegally, originate in the United States.

(h) Under the Firearms Act, as of January 1, 2001, an individual must produce a valid firearms licence or FAC, or a confirmed non-resident declaration to acquire ammunition.

(i) The firearms program contributes to the reduction of crime, has a demonstrable effect in screening firearm owners to better insure safety, and requires safety training for those enjoying firearm sports. The government is focusing on a wide variety of crime reduction initiatives including efforts to better address organized crime, youth offenders, crime prevention, and gun control. The money spent on gun control contributes, with other crime control measures, to the overall safety of Canadian communities.

(j) The Canadian firearms centre is not an enforcement agency and does not collect data regarding firearm seizures. The courts are required to forward copies of all prohibition orders to the chief firearms officer in their jurisdiction in order for the CFO to take appropriate action where a firearms licence is involved. Neither the CFO nor the registrar are involved in firearms seizures.

(k) The Canadian firearms registry on-line (CFRO) is a database that provides law enforcement with specific information on firearms, helps police evaluate potential threats to public safety and remove firearms from a location as a preventive measure. Law enforcement communities have consulted this system more than two million times since December 1, 1998. CFRO helps the police assess public safety threats and complete investigations.

(l) On December 3, 2002, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police re-affirmed its support for the firearms program and its essential crime-fighting tools. Law enforcement is clearly relying on the information contained in CFRO. Since December 1, 1998, it has queried this system over two million times in conducting police work. This shows that police officers are indeed accessing the database in order to forward their investigations.

(m) As part of the firearms program, there are now 1.9 million licensed firearm owners and over 5.9 million firearms have been registered. The vast majority of these are non-restricted firearms such as rifles and shotguns, which were difficult for authorities to trace under the old system because they were not registered.

The Canadian firearms program has taken many steps over the years to assure the quality of the information in its database on firearm owners and guns. The accuracy rate in the database today is over 90%, making this a most valuable tool for law enforcement. The Canadian firearms program requires sufficiently accurate information from clients to help make a determination on the eligibility for their licence and to classify and uniquely identify their firearm. This information includes information about the applicants, such as their address and type of safety training, as well as particulars of each firearm they intend to register.

Information on applications that does not properly identity or describe an individual or does not uniquely identify and classify a firearm is considered an error by the program. Such errors represent less than 1% of all data in the licence and registration data recorded in the Canadian firearms registration system. Any errors in the database are identified and addressed on an ongoing basis through quality assurance audits.

(n) This program is a national investment in public safety. Over the first seven years of operation (including the 2001-02 fiscal year) approximately $688 million has been spent on this program.

This program is much more than a firearms registry. With this investment come the public safety benefits of a licensing system that helps keep firearms from those who should not have them.

Since December 1, 1998, over 9,000 firearms licences have been refused or revoked by public safety officials. As a result of an enhanced screening process, there were 70 times more firearms licences revoked than the total for the previous five years under the old system. Since December 1, 1998, there are also checks on buyers, sellers, as well as gun tracing checks for every gun sale in the country.

It should also be noted that the Canadian firearms program yields significant savings for police services. As part of this program police are no longer burdened with the paperwork and administration involved in accepting firearms applications because these are now mailed to a processing site. This frees up significant police time and resources that can be redirected to investigations and policing.

Question No. 50Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Canadian Alliance Yorkton—Melville, SK

With respect to the Department of Justice 2002-2003 Estimates, Part III--Reports on Plans and Priorities, Firearms Control Program, Long-Term Benefits, what are the “Measures of success” for the: ( a ) number of suspended/refused licences; ( b ) percentage of firearms owners complying with registration; ( c ) ease of registration process; ( d ) number of registered firearms; ( e ) percentage of public support for the program; and ( f ) documented reduction in the number of firearm accidents (long-term result)?

Question No. 50Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Outremont Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

The measures of success for the firearms control program are as follows:

(a) Number of refused or revoked from December 1, 1998 to December 11, 2002.

Applications refused:

Licences Revoked

(b) As of January 4, 2003, 74p. 100 of licensed firearms owners have acted to comply with registration.

(c) It is possible to submit a firearms registration application only by paper registration form at this time, however, the CFC is looking at new on-line services to be provided in the near future.

(d) 5,893,447 firearms have been registered as of January 4, 2003.

(e) Polling released by Gallup Canada on November 27, 2001, reveals that 76p. 100 of Canadians, a majority in every region of Canada, favour “the requirement that by law all firearms in Canada need to be registered with the federal government”. The result is very consistent with other polling in that and prior years.

(f) The rate of firearms accidents has declined from 129 in 1970 to 31 in 1999. (Source: Statistics Canada: Causes of Death). Registration links a firearm to its rightful owner. It works to enhance accountability for one’s firearms, for example, by encouraging safe storage, which helps reduce gun theft and accidents.

Question No. 51Routine Proceedings

January 27th, 2003 / 3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Grant Hill Canadian Alliance Macleod, AB

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government guaranteeing its cost increase projections (i.e. 3 cents for a barrel of crude)?

Question No. 51Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

The Climate Change Plan for Canada provides illustrative costs for cost increases in the price of crude oil. These figures are based on a particular set of assumptions about the design of the emission reduction system for large industrial emitters. Actual costs for sectors and for individual firms will depend on final design and a firm’s unique circumstances. The government is committed to clarifying the general approach in the early months of 2003 through continued discussions with industry, stakeholders, provinces and territories.

Question No. 52Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Canadian Alliance Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government guaranteeing that energy taxes will not be increased in a bid to reach its Kyoto targets?

Question No. 52Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

The Climate Change Plan for Canada contains no proposals to increase energy taxes.

Question No. 53Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Charlie Penson Canadian Alliance Peace River, AB

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government warranting its price increase projection and is it planning on covering anything over and above those projections?

Question No. 53Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

The Climate Change Plan for Canada provides estimates of price increases in various commodities. These figures are based on the economic scenario that the federal-provincial analysis and modelling group agreed to more than a year ago, and the assumptions of the international price of carbon permits of $10 or $50, and assumptions of domestic market dynamics based on extensive discussions with and advice from key industry sectors. Actual price increase for various commodities could differ significantly using alternative approaches to mitigation.

Question No. 54Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Canadian Alliance Crowfoot, AB

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government suspending all grants and contributions to pro-Kyoto groups after ratification since their services are no longer needed?

Question No. 54Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

Grants and contributions made to organizations are not done on the basis of an organization’s stance on the Kyoto protocol. Grants and contributions are provided to organizations to assist the federal government in achieving its public policy objectives, and are done so in an open, transparent and accountable fashion. Since 1998 the climate change action fund--public education and outreach (CCAF-PEO) has contributed $23 million of grants and contributions to 191 public education and outreach projects. The fund has supported proponents of all types, including not-for-profit, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), community groups (voluntary groups, community associations, and institutions), first nations communities, organizations and associations, educational and academic institutions, other non-federal government agencies (provincial, territorial, regional, and municipal) and businesses, industries and their professional associations. Funding for PEO continues until the end of the 2003-04 fiscal year.

Question No. 55Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gary Lunn Canadian Alliance Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government guaranteeing well head or carbon taxes will not be introduced or increased (as the case may be) in a bid to meet its Kyoto targets?

Question No. 55Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

The November 2002 Climate Change Plan for Canada contains no proposals regarding carbon taxes or well head taxes. It has been a long standing position that a carbon tax will not be part of the Government of Canada’s approach to addressing climate change.

Question No. 56Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Scott Reid Canadian Alliance Lanark—Carleton, ON

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government willing to move ahead with Kyoto ratification without the support of the provinces?

Question No. 56Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

On December 16, 2002, the Prime Minister of Canada formally ratified the Kyoto protocol to the United Nations framework convention on climate change.

Canada has a proud tradition of working with other nations towards common goals. We are committed to leadership on international challenges. By ratifying the Kyoto protocol we are part of an international effort to address an issue that knows no boundaries and affects us all.

In ratifying, we are doing the right thing for Canada, for the global environment, and for future generations. We will work with the provinces, territories, industry and stakeholders to meet the climate change challenge together.

Now that the Kyoto protocol has been ratified we will move forward to implement the Climate Change Plan for Canada. Developed in consultation with all provinces and territories, and with all sectors and segments of the population, we know this plan will get results.

It is a truly Canadian plan that sets the stage for all Canadians to do their part to achieve the results we need. It builds on the work of provincial, territorial and municipal governments. It draws on the commitment of industry to work with us to seek out more efficient and effective ways of operating. We intend to keep improving the plan to ensure it reflects and responds to the priorities of Canadians.

Question No. 57Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Scott Reid Canadian Alliance Lanark—Carleton, ON

As part of the Implementation plan for the Kyoto Protocol as called for in the motion adopted by the House on October 24, 2002, is the government guaranteeing infringing upon provincial jurisdiction in meeting Kyoto targets?

Question No. 57Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of the Environment

Respect for jurisdiction is one of the key principles guiding the Climate Change Plan for Canada. The plan is a made in Canada approach that is based on collaboration, partnerships and respect for jurisdiction.

The plan provides a substantial foundation on which to build a concerted national effort. In determining how best to achieve our goals, we must continue this collaborative approach ensuring that provincial and territorial jurisdiction is respected in the process.

Question No. 73Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Inky Mark Canadian Alliance Dauphin—Swan River, MB

With respect to the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development: a ) which Native bands in Canada are under third party management; b ) what is the total deficit of each individual band; and c ) which bands have failed to file their audits with Indian Affairs?

Question No. 73Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Kenora—Rainy River Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault LiberalMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

The answer is as follows:

(a) Native bands in Canada under third party management are as follows:

(b) The Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development cannot provide this information. This information is considered third-party information and is protected under subsection 20(1) of the Access to Information Act (ATIA). In keeping with Treasury Board policy and guidelines relating to the ATIA, prior to releasing this information, a consultative process is undertaken, notice of the intent to release is given to the first nations, and they are given the opportunity to make their representations.

(c) Bands that have failed to file their audits with Indian Affairs are as follows:

Question No. 75Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Inky Mark Canadian Alliance Dauphin—Swan River, MB

With respect to Aboriginal and Metis Veterans of the Second World War and the Korean War: ( a ) which veterans took advantage of Higher Education or Veterans' Land Act benefits; and ( b ) if neither of these options were taken advantage of, what re-establishment credit was paid to each individual veteran?

Question No. 75Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Winnipeg North—St. Paul Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Science

From the time Veterans Affairs Canada was established in 1944, the veterans benefit legislation and the resulting Veterans Affairs administrative practices have guaranteed exactly the same rights to all veterans, native and non-native alike.

Under the post-war demobilization program, veterans could choose one of the following options: a re-establishment credit (which was equal to the war services gratuity), educational assistance (vocational or university training), or assistance under the Veterans’ Land Act (VLA).

Approximately 60% of first nations veterans chose VLA compared with 10% for non-first nations veterans, and DVA paid $2,320 to Indian Affairs for each of these veterans. By comparison, approximately 70% of all veterans chose to take the re-establishment credit (which averaged $450).

A file review was conducted to determine whether Métis veterans received their full entitlement to these benefits. Preliminary results indicate that 78% of Métis veterans received the re-establishment credit, 15% chose assistance under the VLA, and 3% chose educational assistance.

The Government of Canada recognizes that the National Métis Veterans Association (NMVA) and other organizations representing Métis veterans are dissatisfied that they have not received the same offer as first nation veterans.

However, Veterans Affairs Canada has extended an offer to the NMVA to further review the findings of the file review conducted by the department.

Question No. 76Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Ted White Canadian Alliance North Vancouver, BC

With respect to Canadian stocks of smallpox vaccine, what is the total number of undiluted doses presently held under the control of Health Canada, how old are those doses and what percentage can be considered to be still viable, what other governmental and private stocks are available and in what amounts, where are the various stocks located, and what is anticipated to be the total number of doses available in Canada by the end of December 2003?

Question No. 76Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Health

Total number of vials currently held:

*The number of doses in a vial is the maximum expected if administered in the approved manner or in the fashion for which the product was produced. Due to many variables, including product wastage and the availability of vaccine delivery mechanisms, the calculation of vaccine doses can not be accurately stated. For example, if the vaccine is administered with a special bifurcated needle, then a “10 dose vial” could vaccinate between 85 and 100 persons

**Expired vials

***Special Access Programme

All the smallpox vaccine vials were manufactured between 1968 and 1980.

The potency of the vaccine has been tested annually by the manufacturer with satisfactory results.

Health Canada is negotiating to purchase approximately 10 million doses of the smallpox vaccine to ensure the capacity is available to produce more vaccine in the unlikely event that it is needed.

The location of the stockpiles cannot be released for security reasons.

Health Canada and Public Works and Government Services Canada through the advanced contract award notice (ACAN)/request for proposal (RFP), and request for information (RFI) anticipate that approximately 10 million doses will be available by December 2003.