This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #75 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was sexual.

Topics

The EconomyOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Progressive Conservative Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, according to recent Statistics Canada figures, the outlying regions of this country appear to be in a major demographic and economic decline. I saw this for myself during recent trips in Quebec and other parts of Canada.

Last November, the young people of Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik were demanding to see the Prime Minister. Will he go to Abitibi-Témiscamingue in order to see for himself the economic problems besetting that region?

The EconomyOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, we are very proud of our regional economic development program, not only in Quebec but elsewhere in Canada as well. We are working hard with caucus and the provincial governments to ensure the fair and equal distribution of economic opportunities throughout Canada.

Sex Offender RegistryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gerry Ritz Canadian Alliance Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, last week a convicted child molester was turned loose on the streets of my riding. Dennis Richard Gladue preys on young girls. His victims range in age from 11 to one and a half years. Can you believe that, Mr. Speaker? This predator's name will not show up on the minister's phony new sex offender registry.

Like the justice minister, Gladue shows no remorse for his actions either. Why does the Liberal government refuse to put these existing monsters in a national registry so we can protect our children and keep this scum off our streets? Why will it not--

Sex Offender RegistryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Solicitor General.

Sex Offender RegistryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Malpeque P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have explained in the House actually several times in the past how the new sex offender registry will improve safety on the streets in this country.

As I said earlier, we have talked with the federal, provincial and territorial ministers of justice and others about this legislation. They are quite supportive of the legislation. If we could have the members on the other side of the aisle cooperate with us, we could get that legislation through the House of Commons faster. The legislation is designed to make the streets safer and it will.

Sex Offender RegistryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dick Harris Canadian Alliance Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

What nonsense, Mr. Speaker. The fact is that not one single name of a person who has committed a sex offence prior to the passing of the legislation will be on the sex offender registry.

There comes a time when people have to stand up for what they believe in. I ask the government and the minister, why have they chosen to stand on the side of sex offenders and against the victims of these despicable crimes?

Sex Offender RegistryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Malpeque P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite has it all wrong. He clearly has it wrong. When we designed the legislation we wanted to ensure that it could not be challenged by the courts and tossed out.

When we put legislation in place, we want it to do its job effectively. That is why the legislation is designed the way it is, to improve safety on our streets and put those people on the sex offender registry so that police can do a better job in keeping the streets safe.

Statistics CanadaOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, the interviewers at Statistics Canada are misunderstood by their employer, which is denying them a fair and equitable contract. Their working conditions are unacceptable and the minister must intervene.

Will the Minister of Industry break his silence and ask the authorities at Statistics Canada to negotiate in good faith so that these employees can have decent working conditions?

Statistics CanadaOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the parties involved are in the process of reconciling their differences. We will wait for the results.

Statistics CanadaOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, can the minister assure us that the authorities at Statistics Canada are going to show some understanding and treat these workers fairly?

Statistics CanadaOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Industry

Of course, Mr. Speaker, but the process has to be allowed to follow its course. We will see results shortly. I am sure of it.

G-8 SummitOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Myron Thompson Canadian Alliance Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, a total of 10 businesses from the Canmore and Kananaskis area have submitted claims to the government for revenues lost during the G-8 summit last summer. Their claims have been denied or severely reduced and they have been told that they do not have any recourse. There is no appeal process for them. However, they were promised prior to the summit that a mechanism for dispute would be put in place. Why is this not happening?

G-8 SummitOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, it is my understanding that each one of these claims has been very carefully examined against the guidelines that were published before the G-8 summit.

If any of these individuals believes that the guidelines have been misapplied or not applied in the proper way, they are certainly free to draw their point of view to my attention and I will look into it. I am determined to make sure that the guidelines are properly administered as they were published in advance of the G-8 summit. I am happy to see that this in fact turns out to be the case.

G-8 SummitOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Myron Thompson Canadian Alliance Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, I have gone over the compensation package and it is very apparent that these claims decisions are discretionary and subjective and in the hands of the bureaucrats.

These constituents are being confronted with a take it or leave it attitude from the bureaucrats. They are not having the opportunity to be in touch with the minister's department whatsoever.

All I want to know and what they want to know is whatever happened to a fair review hearing that was promised to them prior to the summit? It should be a right for these individuals to be heard. Why are they not getting it?

G-8 SummitOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, if any such individual has a problem with the process, if they think they are being dealt with unfairly, then they need merely to write to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services, House of Commons, Ottawa, K1A 0A6, and I will reply.

Human RightsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Liberal Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Industry.

A human rights complaint has been launched against the government claiming that women are being unfairly shut out of the program to fund 2,000 Canada research chairs.

What is the government doing to ensure that women at Canadian universities have an equal chance at these prestigious positions?

Human RightsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, it is important to let the complaint proceed before the tribunal as it will.

Let me point out that the Canadian research chairs program has drawn international attention as an innovative and effective way of keeping the best and the brightest on the campuses of this nation.

It is important that both men and women fully participate in this program. At the moment there is an insufficient number of women being nominated for the chairs. The Government of Canada is determined to do its part to make sure that is addressed.

We have, among other things, asked the secretariat to strictly enforce rules on the distribution of the chairs to both genders. We have asked universities to nominate more women. We will continue with those efforts.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Betty Hinton Canadian Alliance Kamloops, Thompson And Highland Valleys, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government was warned by the Canadian Alliance years ago that the softwood lumber crisis was looming. Forestry workers are now struggling to pay their mortgages and feed their families. The government promised forestry workers a compensation program. To date there has not been one thin dime.

Workers continue to be denied access to these funds. Why?

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Brant Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart LiberalMinister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, as I have said on a number of occasions, the department is following very closely the issues that are facing workers in the softwood lumber industry, particularly as a result of the dispute with the United States.

The hon. member would be interested to know that a recent Statistic Canada labour force survey indicates that in the Province of British Columbia lumber job levels increased by 14% between January 2002 and January 2003. The number of EI claims in B.C. continue to be lower than in the previous year.

That being said, we are there with programs through employment insurance and working to ensure that the workforce is supported through this difficult time.

Organized CrimeOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Cadman Canadian Alliance Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, last week the Solicitor General was in my riding. He had refused my request to participate in his education about crime in Surrey North. Perhaps he is afraid to be held accountable for his future inaction.

I do know what the RCMP told him about marijuana grow ops and related violent crime in Surrey. I know he is aware that the police lack the resources and the legislation to properly address these threats to public safety. Many in Surrey suspect his little grow op photo op is nothing more smoke and mirrors.

Will he take immediate action based on what he was told by the Surrey RCMP?

Organized CrimeOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Malpeque P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, in fact, I went to the member's riding because of some of the concerns he raised in the House.

He would understand that given the way the House of Commons operates I could not have him in on a meeting where we are talking about operational police matters. That would be the wrong thing to do.

I can tell the member that marijuana grow operations on the ground in British Columbia in the area of Surrey is a serious matter. However I can tell the member that I am extremely proud of the efforts the RCMP.

Tobacco FarmersOral Question Period

March 21st, 2003 / 11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, Rothmans, Benson & Hedges has just ended a 25-year partnership with the flue-cured tobacco farmers of Quebec, citing reasons of climate. Oddly, Ontario tobacco farmers are stuck with a 50 million pound surplus of tobacco that they are trying to dispose of at a lower price. Some 97% of Quebec's flue-cured tobacco farmers are located in the Lanaudière area. I am extremely concerned.

Can the Minister of Agriculture implement an alternate enterprise program immediately in order to help these farmers, who now have to find a new livelihood?

Tobacco FarmersOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Portneuf Québec

Liberal

Claude Duplain LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the member for Joliette asks a very relevant question. Several members from Quebec and Ontario have been made aware of the tobacco farmers' situation.

I can assure you that officials are currently working with tobacco farmers and their office and I quote:

—to work within the available programs on ways to facilitate the readjustment and possible transition of the tobacco farmers.

I can assure the member that the minister is very aware of the situation.

Natural ResourcesOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Andy Burton Canadian Alliance Skeena, BC

Mr. Speaker, the natural resources minister is scheduled to visit Washington, D.C. next week to discuss energy trade issues with his U.S. counterparts. Given his recent disgusting comments about President Bush not being a statesman, what sort of reception does the minister expect to receive in Washington? Can he honestly expect any real results from this visit?

Natural ResourcesOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, this is a highly inflammatory question.

The Prime Minister made his views known on this yesterday in question period. He has every confidence in the Minister of Natural Resources. He certainly expects everyone on the government side to be very sensitive to the pressures facing the government and the people at this time in view of what is happening in the Middle East.