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House of Commons Hansard #116 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was religious.

Topics

Public SafetyOral Question Period

3 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse NDP Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, when this government announced the four page Windsor-Detroit gateway action plan, it left public safety in the dust and holding a time bomb. Approximately 9,000 hazardous material trucks per year illegally cross this border breaking U.S. and Canadian laws. Despite the security risk, the industry and finance minister do not seem to care.

My question is for the Prime Minister. Why is the government so intent on breaking U.S. laws and why is it so intent on turning the Detroit River into another love canal?

Public SafetyOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I draw the hon. member's attention to the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act which covers all modes of transport, including trucks.

Transport Canada is quite vigorous in the application of this law and I vigorously reject the assertions of the hon. member.

Government AppointmentsOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deepak Obhrai Canadian Alliance Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, on the weekend the Minister for International Cooperation criticized her own party because of what she saw as a democratic deficit that she could not reconcile to the fact that she advises other governments to practice good governance.

Does she not now think that the Gagliano corruption scandal also undermines her ability to speak about corruption in other countries?

Government AppointmentsOral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I have grave doubt whether this question is in order since it does not appear to deal with the administrative responsibility of the government.

Société Radio-CanadaOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Bloc Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, Radio-Canada is proposing to change the time of its television broadcast of the Sunday mass. Older people and those with impaired mobility, who make up the majority of the audience, are distressed by this announcement, especially where luncheon is served at 11 a.m. and would conflict with the new scheduled time of the mass.

Can the Minister of Canadian Heritage intervene with Radio-Canada to have it change its decision and continue to broadcast the mass at 10 a.m. on Sunday, to respond to its audience?

Société Radio-CanadaOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Hamilton East Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, thank you very much for the question. I am happy to report to the House that the problem of 10 o'clock mass has been resolved. It will continue to be broadcast at 10 a.m.

FinanceOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Progressive Conservative New Brunswick Southwest, NB

Mr. Speaker, to skirt the Canadian Bank Card Association's non-duality bylaws, Moneris Solutions was set up to process both Visa and Mastercard accounts. I have in my hand many examples of Moneris overcharging retail businesses. Moneris refuses to pay back these overcharges.

Will the minister recommend that the finance committee examine Moneris' behaviour along with the appropriate government agency examining this type of action?

FinanceOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Oak Ridges Ontario

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the members of the finance committee are free to examine whatever issues they want. I would suggest to the hon. member that I am sure the chair of the committee will take the member's words under advisement and will go from there.

FinanceOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. The Chair has notice that the Minister of National Revenue wishes to make certain submissions to the House.

Points of OrderOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, this is in reply to a point of order that was raised by the member for St. Albert and refers to the funding of relief for the home heating expenses program.

In December 2000, the government confirmed through an order in council that it would provide ex gratia payments to individuals and families as a relief for heating expenses. The eligibility to receive the payment would be determined similarly to the eligibility for the goods and services tax credit, with some exclusions for dependants.

As is the case for the goods and services tax credit, the eligibility is founded on the information contained in the income tax and benefit returns filed under the Income Tax Act, in this case the returns for the 1999 tax year.

In order to ensure fairness to all Canadians, payments after 2000-01 have been required for: all eligible Canadians filing a 1999 tax return; Canadians whose 1999 tax returns were reassessed and are now entitled to the payment; or eligible Canadians whose addresses were invalid at the time of the initial issuance of the payment and were subsequently updated.

All of the RHE payments were made as ex gratia payments and charged to CCRA's Vote 1 operating expenditures, as approved by Parliament each year. The ex gratia payments do not require specific parliamentary approval or authority.

Funds for the program were appropriated by Parliament and placed in the CCRA Vote 1 operating expenditures through two Governor General's Special Warrants. No administrative or other limitations were placed on any of these funds other than the requirement to use them for operating purposes.

Subsection 30(2) of the Financial Administration Act deems the Governor General's Special Warrants to be an appropriation, in this case to CCRA's Vote 1 operating expenditures.

Subsection 60(1) of the CCRA act provides authority to carry forward its unused Vote 1 appropriations into the following fiscal year, and these carry-forward funds are the first ones to be used in any subsequent fiscal year, pursuant to subsection 7(2) of the Appropriation Acts. As mentioned earlier, the only limitation is that these funds had to be used for operating purposes. All ex gratia payments made by CCRA for the relief for heating expenses were properly charged in each year to general Vote 1 operating expenditures.

Consequently, CCRA had the necessary authorities to make the RHE payments, both in terms of an order in council for ex gratia payments and the necessary appropriations approved by Parliament. In addition, there is no basis to reduce the CCRA's main estimates as Parliament has already agreed that CCRA may carry forward its unused appropriations.

Thank you for the opportunity to respond, Mr. Speaker. I have tabled my statement, in both official languages, with the Clerk.

Points of OrderOral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

I thank the minister for her submissions. I will be returning to the House in due course on this matter.

Points of OrderThe Royal Assent

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. I have the honour to inform the House that a communication has been received as follows:

Rideau Hall

Ottawa

June 11, 2003

Mr. Speaker,

I have the honour to inform you that the Honourable Ian Binnie, Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada, in his capacity as Deputy of the Governor General, signified royal assent by written declaration to the bills listed in the Schedule to this letter on the 11th day of June, 2003, at 8:25 a.m.

Yours sincerely,

Barbara Uteck

Secretary to the Governor General

The schedule indicates the bills assented to were Bill C-9, An Act to amend the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, Chapter 9; and Bill C-10, An Act to amend the Lobbyists Registration Act,Chapter 10.

Business of the HouseThe Royal Assent

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

It is my duty, pursuant to Standing Order 81(14) to inform the House that the motion to be considered tomorrow during consideration of the business of supply is as follows:

That in the opinion of this House, Canada's infrastructure needs should be met by a regime of stable funding; and that accordingly, this House call on the government to reduce federal gasoline taxes conditional on an agreement with provinces that, with the creation of this tax room, provinces would introduce a special tax to fund infrastructure in provincial and municipal jurisdictions.

This motion standing in the name of the hon. member for Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam is a votable motion. Copies of the motion are available at the Table.

Privacy CommissionerRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I have the honour to lay upon the table the report of the Privacy Commissioner concerning substantially similar provincial legislation. This report is deemed permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates.

Law EnforcementRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Malpeque P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter LiberalSolicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2) I am pleased to table the “Annual Report on the Law Enforcement Justification Provisions, Pursuant to Section 25(3) of the Criminal Code”.

Climate ChangeRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal LiberalMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of the Environment and myself, and pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I am pleased to table, in both official languages, the report that was requested by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development asking for integrated climate change information. The report is entitled “Climate Change: The Federal Investment 1997-2002, A Comprehensive Report”.

Aboriginal AffairsRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Vancouver Quadra B.C.

Liberal

Stephen Owen LiberalSecretary of State (Western Economic Diversification) (Indian Affairs and Northern Development)

Mr. Speaker, under provision of Standing Order 32(2) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, copies of the 2001-02 annual report of the implementation committee of the Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement, the 2001-02 annual report of the Inuvialuit Final Agreement Implementation Coordinating Committee, and the 2001-02 annual report of the implementation committee on the Sahtu Dene and Métis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement.

Fisheries ActRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

West Nova Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-43, an act to amend the Fisheries Act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Injured Military Members Compensation ActRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Winnipeg North—St. Paul Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Liberalfor the Minister of National Defence

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-44, An Act to compensate military members injured during service.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Interparliamentary DelegationsRoutine Proceedings

June 11th, 2003 / 3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Liberal Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian branch of the Assemblée parlementaire de la Francophonie, as well as the financial report relating thereto.

The report deals with the meeting of the APF parliamentary affairs committee held in Sofia, Bulgaria, from May 17 to 21, 2003.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Liberal Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the 38th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, in both official languages, regarding its order of reference of Tuesday, May 6, 2003, in relation to Bill C-34, an act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (Ethics Commissioner and Senate Ethics Officer) and other acts in consequence. The committee has considered Bill C-34 and reports the bill with one amendment.

I would like to thank the members of the committee and also and in particular the staff of the committee and the additional staff we had for this very important legislation. This was a very fine piece of work.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Andy Scott Liberal Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the third report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

Pursuant to its order of reference of Monday, April 28, 2003, your committee has considered Bill C-32, an act to amend the Criminal Code and other acts, and has agreed to report it with amendments.

I also have the honour to table, in both official languages, the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

In accordance with its reference of Wednesday, June 4, 2003, your committee has considered Bill C-205, an act to amend the Statutory Instruments Act (disallowance procedure for statutory instruments) and has agreed to report it without amendment.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Clifford Lincoln Liberal Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, entitled “Our Cultural Sovereignty: The Second Century of Canadian Broadcasting”, concerning the state of the Canadian broadcasting system.

This report has been two and a half years in the making. I am exceptionally pleased that it was done by a parliamentary committee of the House of Commons. I would like to thank all the members who took part in the work, the researchers, the expert advisers and all the parliamentary team that helped put together this very comprehensive report.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Abbott Canadian Alliance Kootenay—Columbia, BC

On this matter, Mr. Speaker, I was co-chair of that committee. I was very pleased with the input that we received from many Canadians. I pay particular attention to two from my constituency, Mr. Ken Collins and Mr. Roger Davies, who appeared before the committee in March 2002.

I am presenting a dissenting report and will be discussing this in full at the National Press Club theatre in a very short period of time, but I want to make particular note of the input of Canadians.

I mentioned Mr. Roger Davies, who was a tireless volunteer. He presented to the committee in March 2002. Unfortunately he passed away last summer and so he will never see this report. I would say that I would like to dedicate it to him, except that he and I had some pretty significant differences of opinion on this kind of issue, but I do want to acknowledge that Mr. Davies, along with all of the other people who came before committee, gave us so much to chew on and so much good information. I wish to thank all Canadians for their participation in this report.

Firearms ActRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Canadian Alliance Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-442, an act to amend the Firearms Act.

Mr. Speaker, this private member's bill is my own initiative. Frankly, it is my response to this government's approach to gun control via Bill C-68 and the registry.Currently the Firearms Act says that if in the past five years a person has committed a violent crime and has been convicted of a violent crime or of threatening to commit a violent crime, that person cannot apply to own a firearm for five years.

My private member's bill does not say after five years: it says if a person has ever committed a violent crime in their life never does that person get to own a gun. If a person has ever beat his wife or ever committed rape or ever committed murder and is released from jail, never in his life does that person get to own a gun in Canada. This is effective criminal justice and this is something the Liberals should put into law.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)