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House of Commons Hansard #42 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was date.

Topics

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Willowdale Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson LiberalMinister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, how could a negotiated settlement, agreed to by the prevailing industry view here in Canada and by the provinces, cede our sovereignty? It is an agreement.

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gerry Ritz Canadian Alliance Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Agriculture returned empty-handed from his last sojourn to Washington. We know he is talking with Secretary Veneman but aside from some proposed changes in regulation, we see literally no movement on the big issue, getting that border open.

Will the minister assure Canadian livestock producers that he will not come back from Washington without a firm date on when that border will be open to live trade?

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant Ontario

Liberal

Bob Speller LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member said, the Government of Canada is deeply committed to getting the border open. Officials from my department and from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency have worked closely and tirelessly with their American counterparts to develop a North American approach to this issue.

I will be meeting with Secretary Veneman again. In fact I just got off the phone with her 10 minutes ago. I am continuing to work with her to ensure the border is opened as soon as possible.

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gerry Ritz Canadian Alliance Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, livestock producers need to see some sort of a plan to see an end to this trade dispute. We are not sending the minister down there to hold the towels while the big boys use the executive washroom.

In light of a recent federal judge's decision in Montana to hold up Canadian beef again, how can the minister think he is making any real progress on convincing the Americans that we have a continental beef industry?

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant Ontario

Liberal

Bob Speller LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member should know that was a legal decision made in the United States by a U.S. judge. We are looking now at the options that we have. What that shows to us is the importance of getting the border open and getting it opened as soon as possible.

I can assure all hon. members that the government will not give up on the farmers and farm families across the country who depend on that border being open.

HealthOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians are concerned about the export of drugs to the United States over the Internet. A large delegation of health representatives went to Washington to talk about this a few days ago.

When will the Minister of Health put an end to this practice, which could create a drug shortage in Canada, not to mention endanger the health of Americans?

HealthOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, to date, virtual pharmacies have not prevented any Canadians from having access to drugs. We continue to make sure that all Canadian pharmacies, even virtual pharmacies, are complying with the Food and Drug Act and all its regulations.

Health Canada will continue to work together with the provinces and territories to better understand the possible impact of cross-border trade in prescription drugs.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, on June 9, 2003, the former minister of Indian affairs told the House that he was within days of signing a final land agreement with the Lubicon Lake Indian Nation.

A lot of days have passed since then and still the impoverished Lubicon Cree are waiting for justice and fairness.

Will the Prime Minister assure the House that finally he will fulfill his government's promise and conclude the Lubicon land agreement in good faith and with no further delays from his government?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell LiberalMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, during the last five years there have been intense negotiations with the Lubicon trying to reach an agreement.

Good progress has been made but, unfortunately, there are still some unresolved issues. We intend to re-engage the Lubicon after its band election at the end of the month. We will work hard to resolve those issues and reach an agreement.

Fisheries and OceansOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough NDP Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans.

Sable Island is a treasured part of my Halifax riding and is well-known as a safe haven for wild horses, whales, seals and birds, and is a base for fishery, coast guard and industry vessels.

Less well-known are the concerns about the future of Sable based research projects on the impact of pollution, atmospheric conditions, global warming and oil and gas development.

On Friday, together with the NDP fisheries critic, I will visit Sable Island. I want to know whether the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans will join us on that Sable Island visit.

Fisheries and OceansOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Halifax West Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for her interest in Sable Island and its importance, which I share. I appreciate the fact that she is aware of the important research being done there.

In fact, I tried to go Sable Island earlier this year but the weather would not allow it. I hope to go sometime, although Friday is not possible for me. However I appreciate the invitation.

Public SafetyOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Canadian Alliance Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, CSIS does not have the ability or the capacity to collect intelligence abroad. According to many security and intelligence experts, including a former PCO deputy clerk and coordinator for security and intelligence, this needs to be changed.

Furthermore, a federal study concluded that Canada needs overseas units to intercept criminals.

Why is the Minister of Public Safety refusing to expand the mandate of CSIS to operate abroad?

Public SafetyOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, it is important to clarify for Canadians that CSIS does collect and always has collected information abroad.

I think the question that we as Canadians and parliamentarians need to address is whether we are, in this world that has changed radically since September 11, collecting enough intelligence and the right kind of intelligence. Those are the kinds of questions that I hope parliamentarians will address.

We tabled a national security policy today, the first ever integrated security policy. I think these are exactly the kind of questions we--

Public SafetyOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Crowfoot.

Public SafetyOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Kevin Sorenson Canadian Alliance Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, in the wake of 9/11, both a former RCMP commissioner and a former deputy director of CSIS recommended that the CSIS Act be revamped. Both these security experts claim that CSIS does not have the legal capacity to collect foreign intelligence.

Again, why is the Minister of Public Safety refusing to listen to these experts and why is she refusing to give CSIS the power to operate abroad?

Public SafetyOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I said, CSIS does operate abroad. It has the ability to operate abroad and collect intelligence in relation to any threat to Canadian security.

The Prime Minister has raised the question of whether we need to collect more foreign intelligence. The Minister of National Defence, in his former capacity, raised that question.

In the national security policy released today we talk about the fact that some of the questions we need to address as we move forward are the amount of intelligence, the kind of intelligence and whether we need to look at new mechanisms by which to collect foreign intelligence.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle Progressive Conservative St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, Canada, the U.S. and other marine countries have to comply with a new international ship and port facility security code by July 1.

The U.S. government has given port operators nearly $700 million to improve security measures.

To the best of our knowledge, this government has not provided any money to maritime industry stakeholders to protect Canada's ports. Could the minister tell us why?

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Stoney Creek Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased with the new integrated approach to national security that was announced today by the Deputy Prime Minister.

The Government of Canada is strengthening our ability for surveillance, for co-ordinated on-water response. The ISP code, which we will meet on July 1, complements the strategy that has been laid out here. The code that we will put in place will meet and in fact exceed the international marine standard. We will have a North American standard. We will be there to assist our ports and our port facilities.

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle Progressive Conservative St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, the RCMP have been assigned to police only the three ports of Montreal, Halifax and Vancouver. There is no new money being allocated for additional port security. The RCMP will patrol only these three ports but the rest of Canada will be protected by commissionaires.

Why are Canadians being left unprotected?

Port SecurityOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Stoney Creek Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are not being left unprotected. In fact, I would dispute that 100%.

The security of marine facilities is an important component of the national security policy. I will certainly be in a position to provide further details in the days to come. It continues to be a key priority in the overall transportation security.

I am committed to working together with our stakeholders in all modes to identify areas where improvements are needed and improvements are necessary. We will be there for our port facilities in the days and weeks to come.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

April 27th, 2004 / 2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Bloc Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in reply to my question, the Minister of Natural Resources said, and I quote: “The truth is that the unemployment rate has dropped in the region. It is about 8%...”. The fact is that the unemployment rate in the Lower St. Lawrence is 11.8%; in the North Shore region it is 15.9%; and in the Gaspé it stands at 18.3%. This is far from the 8% figure provided by the minister.

How can the Minister of Natural Resources and Skills Development arrive at realistic solutions that address the real issues when he is demonstrating, through his answers, his incompetence and his ignorance?

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe LiberalMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, I am in the process of examining the recommendations of Liberal colleagues who have formed a task force to review the conditions affecting the unemployed in the regions.

I will make the appropriate decisions once I have reviewed these recommendations.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Roy Bloc Matapédia—Matane, QC

Mr. Speaker, instead of showing his ignorance, what is the minister waiting for to implement the unanimous recommendations made by the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development in its May 2001 report on employment insurance?

We do not need another committee; we already have the answers. We have been waiting for three years.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe LiberalMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, it is not Bloc Quebecois members who determine the government's agenda. They are unable to make positive recommendations.

Therefore, I will listen to my colleagues from the Liberal task force, who will make appropriate recommendations.

Supreme Court of CanadaOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Diane Ablonczy Canadian Alliance Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, for all his huffing and puffing about the democratic deficit, the Prime Minister's words have turned out to be completely empty. He said in a 2002 Osgoode Hall speech:

--we must establish a process that ensures broad and open consideration of proposed candidates.

That is just hot air because today we learn he will not even let Canadians know the background of candidates for the Supreme Court.

Why does the Prime Minister continually break his promises?