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House of Commons Hansard #125 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was energy.

Topics

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Liberal Welland, ON

Madam Speaker, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act has been a vehicle through which these types of offences have been dealt with but generally speaking these are offences that cross borders and this act does deal with that.

This act also deals with exploitation but it is predominantly within the country. There is trafficking within our country from region to region and this is not covered by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Now we have that base covered as well, which is very important.

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Madam Speaker, I would like to ask my colleague from the Liberal Party how he squares the circle of speaking today about trafficking of human beings and introducing legislation to that effect, and the fact that the Government of Canada for years has been pimping for the underworld by bringing Romanian strippers to work in Canadian strip joints, some of them owned by prominent Liberal lawyers in Toronto, and then losing track of these women into the pornography and sex trade underworld in Canada.

I want to know how a Liberal member of Parliament can stand and talk about passing legislation on sex trafficking of women when the Government of Canada, by policy, has been pimping for underworld practitioners by dragging these exploited women from eastern European countries into brothels and strip joints owned by prominent Liberal immigration lawyers in the city of Toronto. How does he justify that?

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Liberal Welland, ON

Madam Speaker, I find that question most interesting and perhaps amusing. Certainly no member of this party and this government would pimp in the nature that the individual has suggested. That is shameful in my opinion.

We invite people to come to this country to perform certain labour. I would suggested that we had an isolated case a year or so ago but we definitely would not knowingly allow this to go on. In fact, when it came to the light of the authorities it was certainly investigated.

We are just concluding a study and certainly prostitution and the trafficking of women will be key items in the report. The government is addressing those situations. The forfeiture of documents is exactly what happens. Women could come to this country thinking they have legitimate employment only to find that their documents have been confiscated, that they owe a big debt to the individuals who brought them here and are then forced into prostitution to satisfy the debt. This is something that this committee will be looking at and will be making recommendations on so that this type of practice is discontinued.

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Conservative

Betty Hinton Conservative Kamloops—Thompson, BC

Madam Speaker, I wonder if the hon. member across the way would care to comment on Canada's international standing. I believe the OSCE puts out a report every year regarding Canada's part in slavery, in the white slave trade, et cetera. There are three categories and I believe it is category one that has open borders and allows all of this to happen. I believe it is category three that has the tightest security. I may have those numbers reversed but Canada was a number two and I believe it still is a number two.

According to the report, because of the loose immigration and the border aspect of that, women and young children are brought into this country, are held in Canada for a certain period of time and are exported to another country where child slavery, child pornography or just plain old ordinary prostitution takes place.

I would like to hear the member's comments on that particular issue. Does he know what Canada's standing is this year?

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Liberal Welland, ON

Madam Speaker, quite frankly, I am not familiar with the unnamed report to which the member referred so I cannot really make much comment on that. However with regard to loose immigration I take issue with that statement.

I personally have never heard of a situation where we would import people, whether it is men, women or children, to export to other nations. The member is nodding yes. I am certainly not familiar with activities of that nature. I think the suggestion that this goes on is reprehensible that we as a country would allow this. If the member would provide additional information I would certainly like to follow up on that.

However even in our study on prostitution and trafficking of women into this country, children were not referenced. Trafficking of women perhaps does go on but it was not as if they were trafficked here to go elsewhere.

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Northumberland—Quinte West Ontario

Liberal

Paul MacKlin LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Madam Speaker, as has been mentioned in the House today, Canada does have other laws that have been applied to human trafficking but not necessarily domestic laws that have been as precise as what are being proposed in Bill C-49.

I wonder if the hon. member, who I know is well versed in matters of justice and sits as the chair of the justice committee, might be able to comment on how effective Canada has been in terms of bringing human traffickers to justice using the existing methods that we have at our disposal.

Criminal CodeGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Liberal Welland, ON

Madam Speaker, as we have referenced, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act has been a very successful act to prosecute those who traffic across the Canadian border. In April of this year the first charge was laid under the specific trafficking in persons offence, section 118 of the IRPA.

Additionally, a review of the Criminal Code cases from March of 2004 to February of 2005 identified at least 31 individuals who were charged with trafficking related offences which resulted in 19 convictions. The remaining 12 cases were before the courts.

The government saw a need and responded to that need. The effectiveness is being indicated and illustrated in the specifics which I just provided.

Thunder Bay Border CatsStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Ken Boshcoff Liberal Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Madam Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to congratulate the Thunder Bay Border Cats on capturing the 2005 Northwoods League Baseball Championship with an astounding 4-3 win over the American Madison Mallards in front of a record 3,091 cheering fans.

In 2003 the Thunder Bay Border Cats joined the Northwoods League, which is comprised of 12 teams of top collegiate players from across the United States and Canada. After just three seasons, President John Wendal, General Manager Greg Balec and their dedicated staff and players have earned the respect of both the league and the community through their tenacious support.

I ask my fellow members to join me in congratulating the Thunder Bay Border Cats, the 2005 Northwoods League champions.

Gasoline PricesStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

Werner Schmidt Conservative Kelowna, BC

Madam Speaker, while the Minister of Finance rubs his hands gleefully over another surplus, Canadian taxpayers are searching their empty pockets for the money it will take to keep their families warm this winter.

Gas prices are threatening to reach $2 a litre at the pumps and heating costs could double. The finance minister shrugs his shoulders and suggests that a few cents here and there will make no difference. What arrogance.

In fact, each increase of 1¢ per litre at the pump is equal to $32 million to the Government of Canada. The minister has a choice and he knows it. He can help Canadians immediately by reducing the GST on fuel.

This is not the time to be profiting from high gas prices. This is the time to reduce the GST, reduce the price at the pumps and help Canadians.

Orleans RebelsStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Godbout Liberal Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Madam Speaker, I would like to congratulate today Sarah Thompson, Jenn Labelle, Erin Durant, Jenny Allen, Sarah Renaud, Lindsey Hutton, Ashley Vautour, Jillian Taylor, Carolyn Chmiel, Sarah Collins and Sam Pantalone, all members of the Orleans Rebels, a girls fastball team.

These young ladies won both the provincial Tier II Grand Championship and the prestigious Adirondack Avalanche Summer Invitational Tournament in Glen Falls, New York. They also finished third in the 22-team Canada-U.S. pool at the Montreal International Summer Classic, and they brought home the eastern Canadian championship from Saint John, New Brunswick.

I wish to offer my congratulations to these young ladies and their coaches. All residents of Ottawa-Orleans are very proud of them.

Simon WiesenthalStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Richard Marceau Bloc Charlesbourg, QC

Madam Speaker, on September 20, at the venerable age of 96, Simon Wiesenthal passed away. He was one of the most famous Holocaust survivors. He dedicated his life to the pursuit of justice, particularly through his tireless hunt for Nazi war criminals.

Born on December 31, 1908, Simon Wiesenthal experienced the horrors of the death camps and the disappearance of 89 members of his own family at the brutal hands of the Nazis.

After the second world war, in pursuit not of vengeance but rather justice, he devoted himself to hunting down Nazi criminals, wherever they were hiding. As a result, he helped locate some 1,100 war criminals, including Adolf Eichmann, one of the architects of the Shoah, and Franz Stangl, camp commander for Treblinka and Sobibor.

He has been called the conscience of the Holocaust by refusing to bury his terrible memories and serving as a permanent reminder of the victims of the Holocaust.

He believed, and rightly so, that freedom without justice was impossible. The victims of the Holocaust and the entire world are forever in his debt.

Hurricane KatrinaStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Liberal Beauséjour, NB

Madam Speaker, Canadians were saddened by the tragic events that occurred in Louisiana and Mississippi as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

The mayor of Bouctouche, Aldéo Saulnier, and numerous residents of this New Brunswick town decided to do something to help their Cajun friends in Saint Martinville, Louisiana, where thousands of evacuees sought shelter.

Aldéo organized a campaign, and individuals and businesses made generous donations of cash and goods to assist victims in Louisiana. A truck fully loaded with donations was sent off to Saint Martinville. People have shown remarkable generosity.

I congratulate the mayor of Bouctouche and the many volunteers who came to assist the people of Saint Martinville, Louisiana, their twin community, who were affected by the terrible events of Hurricane Katrina.

Emergency PreparednessStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Carol Skelton Conservative Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, every community across Canada can fall victim to a tragedy. Unfortunately, the federal Liberal government's failure to adequately prepare it for emergency will cost us lives. The fact that only 14% of its promised funding for Nova Scotia's disasters has been delivered speaks volumes.

When I assisted in flood relief in the United States and Manitoba, I witnessed first-hand the benefits of proper training, equipment and preparation. The government continues to ignore the lessons of history. Our medical professionals, licensed provincially, would be unable to administer medical assistance across provincial borders.

Most first responders remain under-equipped and poorly trained. Before a disaster is the best time to prepare. Let us cut the red tape. Let us train and fund emergency preparedness now, not after a disaster.

Simon WiesenthalStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Liberal Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to pay tribute today to Simon Wiesenthal, who died in Vienna at the age of 96.

Sixty years ago, Simon Wiesenthal was a man without a name, without hope and without a future, known only by the number tattooed on his arm. The only survivor from a family of 89 people shipped to Nazi extermination camps, Simon Wiesenthal dedicated the last 50 years of his life to hunting down the war criminals responsible for murdering 6 million Jews in Europe during the Holocaust; he played a significant role in the capture of Adolf Eichmann and Franz Stangl, the commandants at the Treblinka and Sobibor camps.

He will be remembered as the conscience of the Holocaust because, as he often said, “When history looks back, I want people to know the Nazis weren't able to kill millions of people and get away with it”

Simon Wiesenthal, we shall never forget.

Gérin-Lajoie DoctrineStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Bloc La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, with profound outrage, the people of Quebec have once again seen the Liberal government renege on its promises. Indeed, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has declared that he would not allow Quebec to speak with its own voice on the international scene, even in matters within its jurisdiction, for fear that, one day, the government in Quebec might be headed by sovereignty fanatics.

However, shortly before the 2004 federal election was called, the Prime Minister had recognized that, in international forums, Quebec should be allowed to speak on matters within its jurisdiction.

On behalf of the government, the member for Papineau is backing out of the positions developed in the 1960s by Liberal minister Paul Gérin-Lajoie. He is joining the ranks of those who want to build Canada on the back of Quebec. More importantly, he is making it clear that, if it wants to defend its own interests in international forums, Quebec has no choice but to achieve complete and full sovereignty.

Simon WiesenthalStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Liberal Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I too rise today to pay tribute to the late Simon Wiesenthal, the famed Nazi hunter who died last Tuesday at the age of 96.

Mr. Wiesenthal was a prisoner in the Mauthausen death camp in Austria when it was liberated in 1945. Following its liberation, he made it his life's work to track down those individuals responsible for the Holocaust. Not only did he seek justice for the victims of the Holocaust, but he was truly a voice for those who could not speak. Often called the conscience of the Holocaust, his efforts helped bring more than 1,100 Nazi war criminals to justice.

Today the Simon Wiesenthal Centre, headquartered in Los Angeles, continues the work started by him. It continues to strive to eliminate anti-Semitism, as well as other forms of tolerance in today's world.

I ask my colleagues to join me in paying tribute to Mr. Wiesenthal, his accomplishments and his legacy.

Internet in SchoolsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Conservative Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, the educational use of the Internet in schools across our nation is now in jeopardy. Why? Because the government has tabled a piece of copyright legislation that ignores the fact that the legal framework for Internet use in the classroom is not addressed. This could have devastating consequences for teachers and students in my riding of Kildonan—St. Paul and all across our nation. The 2005 school year has already started. It has to be done now.

All educators want is access to information on the Internet that is intended to be free of charge in the first place. Creators who wish to sell their materials online can limit access very readily through a subscription or a password process. This educational amendment is crucial to the schools across our nation.

Canadian Broadcasting CorporationStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Michael John Savage Liberal Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, for the past six weeks the management of CBC has locked out 5,000 employees. This lockout is not only affecting workers and their livelihoods but the longer the situation is allowed to continue the more the future of the CBC is called into question.

Like other members, I have requested that the heritage committee call before it members of senior management of the CBC in order to explain to Parliament why CBC workers continue to be locked out and also to explain their mandate for the corporation as they see it. As well, some of us have also indicated that we will refuse to do CBC interviews as long as the lockout continues.

Many of us now believe the public has a right to know what is really going on. The CBC that Canadians trust is in danger of slowly disappearing. The CBC is not just another corporation, not just another service to the public, but a symbol of our country, indeed a value that we need to sustain.

I call upon the CBC management to act in good faith and to end the lockout.

Terry Fox's Marathon of HopeStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie NDP Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, amid all the end of summer controversy about hurricane Katrina, gas prices, the CBC lockout and various other important issues, many Canadians quite properly focused for a time on a very important anniversary, the 25th anniversary of Terry Fox's Marathon of Hope.

The courage and determination Terry displayed in his fight against cancer and for a cure continues to be a remarkable source of inspiration to millions.

On September 16, I was pleased to walk with students from Wayoata Elementary School in Transcona at an event to honour Terry Fox. Terry is very special to the students of Wayoata Elementary School because he attended there for two years before his family moved to B.C. in 1966.

Transcona is proud to be associated with Terry Fox. He has become a national and international symbol of both the tragedy of cancer and the inextinguishable hope that some day, through working together to fund research and prevention, cancer will be beaten.

Anthony Gordon, Leo Johnston, Brock Myrol and Peter SchiemannStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Conservative Edmonton—Spruce Grove, AB

Mr. Speaker, today the family members of the murdered RCMP officers, Constables Anthony Gordon, Leo Johnston, Brock Myrol and Peter Schiemann, made the following statement:

Today our families call upon Parliament...to begin crafting an effective national drug strategy... This strategy would involve committing far greater resources to law enforcement agencies at both provincial and federal levels in the war against drugs.

The families went on to say:

Our politicians also need to see that Canadians want change. We therefore ask all Canadians on October 3--one week from today and exactly seven months since our sons were murdered--to turn on their front lights from 8-10 p.m. Whether it be a front porch light, a garage light, a light in your living room apartment--please turn it on. We want to see a wave of light move across Canada's time zones from east to west as a show of unity on these issues. Let it be a wave of light and a surge of energy for change. So the appeal from our four families to all Canadians is that you join us in this referendum of lights.

Gasoline PricesStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the dramatic spikes in the cost of oil continue to hold the consumers of Quebec and Canada hostage.

Regardless of the international context, it is wrong to believe that the federal government is without recourse and has no means of curbing the increase in the price of oil or mitigating its impact.

On April 20 Liberals and Conservatives rejected a Bloc Québécois motion to create a petroleum monitoring agency responsible for preparing an annual report on all aspects of the industry.

Over the summer, the Bloc Québécois proposed an assistance plan for the most vulnerable: families on modest incomes, remote areas and the hardest hit sectors of the economy. This plan also recognizes that it is imperative to discipline the industry, reduce our dependence on oil and increase taxes on the oil industry.

Solutions exist, but the federal Liberals refuse to budge and to implement them for fear of upsetting their friends and contributors in the major oil companies.

Chuck CadmanStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Stephen Harper Conservative Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, today I rise to pay tribute to our former friend and colleague, the former member of Parliament for Surrey North, Chuck Cadman.

It was out of great personal tragedy that Chuck first chose to present himself for public office.

The senseless death of his son Jesse in 1992 drove Chuck to become an outspoken advocate of victims' rights in Canada. He and his wife Donna founded the group Crime Responsibility and Youth to counsel and help young offenders and at risk youth. His agenda was clear: Changes needed to be made to the criminal justice system, specifically stricter sentences for violent young offenders.

Chuck was an honest and decent man who wanted change for the better. He was a loving husband, a caring father and a good friend to many.

His hard work and dedication to justice issues will forever be his legacy in Ottawa, in Surrey and right across the country.

SomaliaStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Borys Wrzesnewskyj Liberal Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the hon. Sharif Hassan Shaykh Aden, Speaker of the Transitional Federal Parliament of Somalia, is visiting with his Canadian counterparts to share with us the many challenges that his country faces.

Just recently I returned from a fact finding mission to Somalia where I saw first-hand the heart-wrenching conditions that are the result of 14 years of civil war and the anarchy of warlordism.

I also met with President Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed, Prime Minister Ali Muhammad Ghedi, as well as many ministers and parliamentarians of the transitional federal government.

The message I heard from the Somali people was that their country had arrived at an historic opportunity and that they were awaiting their leaders to rise to the occasion, to set aside their personal interests and ambitions in order to reclaim a future for the people of Somalia and for the children of Somalia.

I welcome Speaker Aden and I hope that his visit will give impetus to Canada playing a greater role in civil society building in Somalia during this historic opportunity.

Somalia Hánolato!

Élie FalluStatements By Members

September 26th, 2005 / 2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, last June, Élie Fallu announced his retirement from active politics. I want to pay tribute to this kind-hearted man, who for 43 years worked endlessly for the people of Quebec and Sainte-Thérèse.

Mr. Fallu was heavily involved in the Lower Laurentian area in the union movement, education, and promoting arts and culture. He was instrumental in getting the Montréal—Blainville—Saint-Jérôme commuter train on the tracks.

He was twice elected to the Quebec National Assembly as a member of the Parti Québécois. He was the mayor of Sainte-Thérèse and reeve of the Thérèse-De Blainville RCM. His entire life and career were guided by his desire to serve his people and to fight poverty.

He was one of the first sovereignists and an active member of the Council for Sovereignty, who proclaimed his unwavering faith in the ability of Quebeckers to govern themselves.

Mr. Fallu, the Bloc Québécois salutes and thanks you.

Member for Chilliwack—Fraser CanyonStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Conservative Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon, BC

Mr. Speaker, early this summer I was given the unpleasant news that I have cancer. It is the sort of news that thousands of Canadians, including many in this House, must grapple with all too often. Medically speaking, let us just say that I have had better summers.

Yet the summer also reconfirmed that when the going gets tough it is relationships that really matter.

My relationship to constituents, to friends and co-workers matter more than ever.

My relationship to God brings a peace that passes understanding.

My relationship to family, many of whom are here today, is always special, and this summer it has been especially sweet.

Many people have taken time to encourage us during the weeks since my diagnosis and I want to thank every one. My family and I treasure every word, we cherish every call and we covet every prayer. Truly, encouragement is one of the gifts of the spirit.

It is time now for all of us to get back to our nation's business and I have been looking forward to this for some time. The work here will always be important to me but those relationships that I talked of will be important forever.