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House of Commons Hansard #27 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was money.

Topics

HIV-AIDSOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, we now have the government's track record on HIV-AIDS and that member knows it.

The community was counting on $84.4 million by 2009. There are 4,500 Canadians that become infected every year. Cuts to community programs mean that number goes up.

Will the minister admit to the Canadian AIDS community and to Mr. Gates that he stole that money and will he put it back in the program?

HIV-AIDSOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

HIV-AIDSOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Order. I think perhaps the phrasing of the hon. member's question is unfortunate, but I can see that the parliamentary secretary has an answer and is prepared to respond, so we will hear from him.

HIV-AIDSOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher ConservativeParliamentary Secretary for Health

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member really needs to reflect on her record as minister of state for public health because it was really quite disappointing. The fact remains that $16 million was cut under the previous government. We are legally obligated to follow through on that.

However, we are investing $84.4 million for AIDS. I encourage the member to embrace this government's approach and chill out. It will be good.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Bev Shipley Conservative Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, I think I will change the topic.

The TD economics report yesterday provided a glowing vision for the future for agriculture in Canada. It said:

--through ongoing efforts to adapt and adjust, many agricultural producers have emerged from this period in a position of strength, with the sector as a whole retaining its status as an important driver of productivity and prosperity in this country.

Could the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food explain to the House how this government will continue to ensure a bright future for Canada's agriculture producers?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz ConservativeMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

That is probably the best agricultural question yet, Mr. Speaker.

While we continue to work with the livestock sector to get it past its present difficulties, it is encouraging to see the tremendous potential of agriculture and agri-food. The TD economics report gives credit to the hard work of farm families. Along with them, we are working with provinces and stakeholders to build a firm foundation for the future of agriculture.

Canadian farmers are ready to produce food, pharmaceuticals, as well as biofuels for Canada and the world. Canadian farmers want lower taxes, streamlined regulations, and a more responsive safety net. Because this government always puts farmers first, we are getting that job done.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Statistics Canada reports that spending by industry on capital investments to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions actually dropped by 35%. Oil and gas slashed its investments by 46%, while the power industry cut its investments by 96%. The government ensures that Canada will fall further and further behind.

When will the government stop following failed Liberal policies, and stop subsidizing and start penalizing the biggest polluters?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the government is working aggressively on massive regulatory measures against the large emitters, the large polluters in this country. For far too long we had a voluntary, hope everything went well approach. That is not good enough. That is why we are working aggressively to tackle climate change, something that did not happen for 10 long years under the previous government.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is a little sad and quite pathetic that after almost a year as minister, he continues to compare himself to a failed Liberal policy to measure up to Canadians.

The National Energy Board has said that his policy will not meet Canada's targets. Big polluters are not investing because the government refuses to regulate them.

How many regulations does the minister have sitting on his desk that he has not signed and why after almost more than a year has he not brought in one single regulation against big polluters?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we signalled this past April that large final emitters, the large polluters in Canada, are going to have to reduce their emissions by 6% a year for the first three years of our plan and then a constant 2% improvement. We are working aggressively on these measures, as I know industry is as well.

JusticeOral Questions

November 29th, 2007 / 2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Liberal Pickering—Scarborough East, ON

Mr. Speaker, National Parole Board documents show that a Canadian citizen facing execution in the U.S. did not commit his crimes alone. However, his accomplice, who made a plea bargain and was transferred to Canada, is now a free man.

Did the Minister of Public Safety, in his ideological driven bent to change the policy on commutation of death sentences on Canadians abroad, even bother to consult and to look at this document, and to recognize the obvious extenuating circumstances of this case?

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think we have made it very clear where the government stands on this particular issue. Inasmuch as the individual in question has now filed an application or started a lawsuit, I think it would be inappropriate to comment.

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Liberal Pickering—Scarborough East, ON

Mr. Speaker, that minister and his colleague in public safety have already made comments on this matter, to the detriment of Mr. Smith. In terms of what the minister's response has been and given his lack of respect for equality and justice before the law, he has indeed been walking away from the defence of a Canadian in terms of our own position with respect to the death penalty.

Will the justice minister admit that there has been a failure to study all the facts surrounding the Smith case and that the government's knee-jerk decision not to seek clemency is a complete disregard for the rule of law that he and his colleagues apparently believe in, and, that in this error, this may very well lead to the execution of a Canadian abroad?

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I listened carefully to the hon. member's question, but the individual in question has filed a lawsuit on this very issue with the Canadian courts and of course it would be inappropriate to comment.

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Liberal Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, as we heard, National Parole Board documents show that the Canadian prisoner on death row in the U.S. for whom the government refuses to seek clemency did not act alone. His accomplice was returned to Canada long ago.

They were co-accused. How could the government make such a decision that clearly puts one Canadian's legal status and life above another's?

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think we have made it very clear that a lawsuit has been filed on this matter, within the last couple of weeks, I believe, and therefore it would be inappropriate to comment.

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Liberal Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is not okay to brush this issue off with non-answers. The government's knee-jerk decision on this case will result in the death of a Canadian, a policy decision that a majority of Canadians does not support.

Did the government read the documents produced by the National Parole Board? If so, why did it come to such a quick conclusion in a case that is not exactly black and white?

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

As I have said, Mr. Speaker, it would be inappropriate to comment.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Bloc Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment said yesterday, and I quote:

There are 13 provincial and territorial governments, and they are all entitled to take a position. I have the support of the House of Commons for my position.

This is totally untrue. What planet is the minister living on. What greenhouse gas has he been breathing? How can the minister make such statements when, for weeks now, the opposition has been criticizing the government, which is intent on killing the Kyoto protocol?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the government has been very clear. We laid out in very specific terms our position with respect to the environment and the need to work globally for a solution to climate change. We put it all in the Speech from the Throne and it was adopted by this House.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Bloc Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, it takes some nerve to say today in this House that he has the support of the majority.

Is that not why he wishes to exclude the opposition, so he can continue to peddle his hare-brained ideas and say he has the support of the House? Doe he not wish to exclude the opposition so he can say whatever he likes, to whomever he likes and however he likes on the international scene, just as he does here, in Canada?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the government is required to maintain the confidence of the House. We put forward our environmental program in the Speech from the Throne. That Speech from the Throne was adopted. Decisions in this country are made by those people who show up and vote.

I would concede that I am a little bit more careful about my travelling companions.

DarfurOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Liberal Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in question period the government said that it must do everything to ensure that atrocities like gang rape do not occur, but gang rape and mass murder are occurring right now in Darfur.

Shockingly, the Minister of Foreign Affairs and his senior officials said that his government would do nothing and contribute nothing to the new hybrid force and for the essential air and ground transportation the force needs to stop the genocide.

Why is the government not going to contribute anything to the new AU-UN hybrid force for its air and ground transport--

DarfurOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

DarfurOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Simcoe—Grey Ontario

Conservative

Helena Guergis ConservativeSecretary of State (Foreign Affairs and International Trade) (Sport)

Mr. Speaker, we continue to be deeply concerned about the dire humanitarian situation in Darfur. As the hon. member knows, we are part of an international effort. In fact, Canada is the fourth largest donor to this mission.

The situation in Darfur has been referred to the International Criminal Court, which has issued arrest warrants for crimes against humanity and war crimes. The determination of the crimes as genocide is a matter for the court to decide.

We, the Government of Canada, continue to call on the Government of Sudan to cooperate with the International Criminal Court and to turn over the suspects.